Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes

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Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes

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Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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1st place: Passo del Vivione – Length: 57 kilometers • Height: 1827 meters • Opening times: May to October • Maximum gradient: 15 percent • Special features: One of the narrowest paved roads in the entire Alpine region.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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Passo del Vivione: Driving on Vivione is pleasure in its purest form.

Little traffic, countless hairpin bends, panoramic views of the Adamello group. In short: a pass with magnificent nature.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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Passo del Vivione: the route.

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The Vivione Pass attracts with small, eventful branches, super narrow asphalt strip and lots of variety.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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2nd place: Passo Duran – Length: 25 kilometers • Height: 1605 meters • Opening times: April to November • Maximum gradient: 15 percent • Special features: Little traffic.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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The Passo Duran is an insider tip: to the south-east of the Sella Loop, it runs a lot through the forest and offers magnificent views every now and then.

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The route of the Passo Duran.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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Old villages, mended asphalt, a pass to enjoy, not to heat.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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3rd place: Passo Rolle – Length: 43 kilometers • Height: 1984 meters • Opening times: All year round • Maximum gradient: 11 percent • Special features: One of the oldest Dolomite passes, leads through a wonderful national park.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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A more sporty, natural driver offers the reel some opportunities for beautiful lean angles.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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The route of the Passo Rolle.

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At the latest after the top of the pass, which has been built up for tourists, you should stop to take a look at the tower-like peaks of the Pala group or the beautiful landscape of the Parco Naturale Paneveggio.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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4th place: Rasso Staulanza – Length: 26 kilometers • Height: 1773 meters • Opening times: Continuous • Maximum gradient: 14 percent • Special features: Nice, fast turns

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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The north side of the Staulanza offers sporty drivers a paradise of dynamic curves and good asphalt. On the south side, the journey is slowed down, picturesque places beckon.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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The route: Passo Staulanza.

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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Even if the landscape and the top of the pass do not seem quite so spectacular, the Staulanza definitely wins the driving pleasure rating. Go there, try it out!

Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes
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5th place: Jaufenpass – Length: 35 kilometers • Height: 2094 meters • Opening times: May to October • Maximum gradient: 12 percent • Special features: northernmost inner Italian Alpine pass, postcard panorama.

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The route of the Jaufenpass. Spectacular views, quick changes between light and shadow, lots of motorcycles in season.

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Alpine passes in northern Italy: the forgotten passes

Motorcycle tours: Alpine passes in Northern Italy
The forgotten passports

Of course there are many more passes with rustic charm in northern Italy. We picked these five because they offer a good compromise between height and exoticism.

Markus Biebricher

08/04/2011

Bravo, Vivione! The pass leads from Val Camonica into the middle of the Bergamasque Alps and thus into an extremely charming landscape of Lombardy. The asphalt road, which is only two to three meters wide, winds through mountain scenery that would make any model railroad fan green with envy. Driving on the Vivione is pleasure in its purest form. Little traffic, countless hairpin bends, panoramic views of the Adamello Group, the idyllic top of the pass with a mountain lake and the opportunity to take a harmless detour into the terrain make this pass a grandiose nature and driving experience. It can also be combined well with the Gavia or Mortirolo pass. Our tip: stop at the inn at the top of the pass and enjoy the heavenly peace. The Passo Duran in the Veneto region is an insider tip. It is located south-east of the Sella-Runde, runs a lot through the forest, with magnificent views being offered every now and then. The narrow road is of widely varying asphalt quality and is often unsecured. So caution is advised, especially in the confusing corners. A pass for heating looks different, but the Duran unfolds a rustic charm if you take your time, enjoy the road layout and the surroundings and can look forward to flowers, old villages, moss-covered bridges or bizarre trees. Many motorcyclists often meet at the top of the pass, the Rifugio Tome and the Rifugio San Sebastiano invite you to linger and spend the night. Passes in the neighborhood are Staulanza, Giau, Fedaia, Cibiana, Cereda, San Pellegrino and San Oswaldo. Our tip: a mountain tour on the nearby 2,488 meter high Cima San Sebastiano.

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The forgotten passports

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The Passo Rolle gained notoriety during the war in the Dolomites (1915 to 1918) because one of the main battle lines ran along the mountain range at the pass. The story of the forests around San Marino di Castrozza and Paneveggio, from which the famous violin maker Stradivari took the wood for his instruments, is more pleasant. The Venetians also visited the forest to cut the best wood for their ships. Motorcyclists drive from Predazzo to Fiera di Primiero or vice versa and enjoy swift curves and cheeky slopes, especially on the south ramp. At the latest after the top of the pass, which has been built up for tourists, you should stop to take a look at the tower-like peaks of the Pala group or the beautiful landscape of the Parco Naturale Paneveggio. The role can be combined, e.g. B. with the passes Valles, Cereda and Colbricon. Our tip: drive up and down the Valles starting from the Rolle.
Of the five passes presented here, the Staulanza is without question the one with the fastest turns. The well-developed connection between Selva di Cadore and Zoldo Alto is particularly impressive on the north side, with great asphalt and racetrack-like radii in a typical Dolomite landscape. On the south side, narrow loops, surprisingly lovely views and the up-and-coming town of Zoldo Alto with its districts Mareson, Pecol, Pianaz and Fusine are impressive. The asphalt is not that good anymore, but it is still enough for fun slopes. From Selva di Cadore it also goes to the Passo Giau. The Fedaja, Falzarego and Duran passes are also easily accessible from the Staulanza. Even if the landscape and the top of the pass do not seem quite so spectacular, the Staulanza definitely wins the driving pleasure rating. Our tip: The rifugio on the top of the pass offers delicious food, and there are two worthwhile climbing gardens nearby.

The Jaufenpass is the shortest connection between the South Tyrolean tourist strongholds of Sterzing and Merano. The pass is accordingly heavily frequented during the season. The asphalt quality alternates between good and moderate, and a lot is being repaired. The south side offers slightly more hairpin bends than the narrow switchbacks on the north side. On both sides you have to reckon with a quick change between light and shadow and be careful accordingly. Beware of coaches too. But early in the morning or later in the afternoon the world is all right on the hunt. Our tip: climb up the western ridge from the top of the pass and enjoy the great view on several sides.

The route: You can embark on the route of the forgotten passes either via Garmisch and Innsbruck or via Fussen and Imst. It almost seems unfair to highlight our route, as the north of Italy, especially in the Dolomites, is teeming with fascinating motorcycle routes. But at least Alpine connoisseur and MOTORRAD action team tour guide Daniel Lengwenus gave this round his seal of approval. The route guru sees the tour as a stimulus and attests to every pass and its neighbors that an enjoyable individual ride is also worthwhile. According to taste and driver nature.

The evaluation: The points scale represents the ones we have developed known from last year’s MOTORRAD issues “Pass disciplines” The general driving pleasure includes an assessment of the road surface in combination with the variety of the route, the natural and driving impression. The cornering experience is divided into fast and slow, because there are possibilities for variation, depending on whether the respective bend allows a round stroke and a fluid driving style, is clearly visible and is addicting in its own way. The pass height as the geographical goal of each pass is evaluated separately with regard to the quality of the break including the view. The experience of nature while driving on the pass is another criterion. As in the case of Vivione, Duran or Rolle, it can dominate in such a way that even driving slowly becomes an absolute pleasure. Of course, the individual disciplines overlap, and our ratings are subject to subjective assessments. Which means that they can be discussed.

Spend the night: This time we can recommend the Rifugio San Sebastiano on Passo Duran (www.passoduran.it, phone 00 39/04 37/6 23 60), representing all other selected hotels in northern Italy that are listed in the 2011 MOTORRAD hotel guide are. The tank backpack-friendly hotel guide can be ordered by calling 07 11/1 82/13 74 and will be sent to our readers free of charge.
Maps / literature / addresses: MairDuMont general map of South Tyrol-Trentino and Veneto-Friuli, scale 1: 200,000, EUR 8.50 each, Great Alpine Road Guide, Denzel-Verlag, EUR 39.90, www.alpentourer.de,
www.dolomitesworld.com

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