Oil care tips for the motorcycle

Table of contents

Oil care tips for the motorcycle
Schoch

Oil care tips for the motorcycle

Oil care tips for the motorcycle

Oil care tips for the motorcycle

Oil care tips for the motorcycle

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With olive oil from mom’s kitchen, the shine of plastic parts on the motorcycle can be permanently restored.

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Commercial olive oil and a soft, clean cotton rag are sufficient to care for most plastic parts.

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The olive oil is applied thinly to the plastic parts with the cloth until an oily sheen appears.

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After a short exposure time, the olive oil has loosened the dirt, which can now be easily wiped off. Then polish with a soft cloth.

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The hard plastic intake snorkel of this Moto Morini has been heavily bleached and brittle after three decades.

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After two treatments with olive oil, the part has regained its original shine.

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Ballistol oil is very suitable for the effective care of bleached rubber or plastic parts.

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After just a few minutes, it has removed the dirt and restored the original shine.

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The Guzzi TT is actually too good for the terrain. It is sprayed with silicone oil to protect it from dirt.

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When spraying, all engine and exhaust parts as well as the tires must be carefully covered with cloths.

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When putting on new rubber grips on the handlebars, oil is absolutely taboo! A quick cleaner is ideal for this.

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This evaporates after a few hours, then the rubber grip sits immovably on the steering tube.

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The piece of felt on the ignition adjustment cam is used to lubricate the breaker contact lugs.

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In order for it to be able to permanently lubricate the breaker contact lugs, a special and very viscous breaker oil is required

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The pressure of hose clamps sometimes causes hoses to stick to the connecting piece. To be able to pull it off without damaging it, lift the hose slightly and spray multispray into the gap.

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After a short exposure, the adhesive bond begins to loosen. By repeatedly spraying and turning the fuel hose, it can now be removed from the carburetor socket without damaging it.

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To prevent the rubber hose from sticking in the future, put a little silicone grease on the nozzle, where it is spread thinly.

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Then pull on the fuel hose and fix it again with the clamp.

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Coking on pistons and other engine parts is often very persistent. Mechanical removal carries the risk of damage.

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This can be done safely with a sealant remover that gently and quickly dissolves coking.

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To remove very stubborn coking, allow the sealant remover to take effect for a long time.

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Sometimes you still need a soft plastic brush to remove all residues from the affected components.

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Viscous grease in the steering head bearing can be freshened up with penetrating oil for a certain time and thus made more supple. So that the penetrating oil can mix with the tough grease, move the handlebars back and forth while spraying.

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Lubricating with ordinary roller bearing grease prevents the cardan shaft in the cardan tunnel from rusting unnoticed.

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Only high-pressure-resistant grease with solid content may be used for length compensation on the cardan shaft.

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The high-pressure-resistant grease is to be applied evenly to all gears of the cardan – ideally annually. With regular care, all cardan components are well protected against rust and premature wear.

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To protect the fork seals, a narrow strip of fabric is moistened with engine oil.

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After lifting the dust cap, the oil-damp (not wet!) Strip of fabric is wrapped around the standpipe and thus picks up dust and dirt.

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Spray some silicone spray on the standpipes. This helps many telescopic forks to have a better response.

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After spraying on the silicone oil, wipe it off lightly so that a light film of oil remains on the standpipes.

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Oil care tips for the motorcycle

Oil care tips for the motorcycle
Olive oil and cotton cloth

Content of

Nothing works on a motorcycle without oil and grease. But these agents can do more than just lubricate engines, gears, chains or mechanical parts. Tips and tricks on what else the lubricants can be used for – and where they have no place.

Marcel Schoch

02.03.2017

No, this is not about the classic oil service and lubrication service. It is about the question of what other lubricants such as these are good for. Dietmar Schmid, application technician at Liqui Moly, is someone who knows this very well: “Oils are very well suited for the preparation of surfaces on older motorcycles.”

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Processing plastics

For example, to remove gray haze on black plastic parts. Peter Steger from R&R Fahrzeugtechnik in uberacker (www.rr-kfz.de) recommends commercially available olive oil from the supermarket, which is applied very thinly to the plastic surfaces with a clean cotton cloth. “After a quarter of an hour you wipe off this barely recognizable oil film with a dry cloth,” explains the expert, “there is enough time for the olive oil to loosen stubborn dirt.” After wiping dry, the original black sheen can usually be seen recognize the plastic parts. Repeat this procedure for stubborn dirt and leave the oil film on overnight. “The next day, just wipe off the last remains of the oil and polish the surfaces, then the plastic parts will look like new again,” promises Peter. Even bench seats can be freshened up in this way. It doesn’t get slippery on the imitation leather furniture afterwards, as the olive oil is completely absorbed after two days.


Oil care tips for the motorcycle


Schoch

Commercial olive oil and a soft, clean cotton rag are sufficient to care for most plastic parts.

The Ballistol oil from Klever is still considered a universal talent. “It is one of the few alkaline oils, therefore it is environmentally friendly and suitable for many maintenance measures on the motorcycle, especially for plastic maintenance,” says Peter. Ballistol does not resinify and has a practically unlimited shelf life, and like olive oil, it is completely biodegradable and skin-friendly. Care should only be taken with foam rubber and polystyrene, as it can penetrate and dissolve them. “However, all oil-resistant plastics and types of rubber can be treated with Ballistol,” is Peter’s rule of thumb. Applied very thinly with a soft cotton cloth, it is wiped off again after a quarter of an hour and the treated plastic surface is polished. If the desired gloss level has not yet been achieved, repeat the procedure. “Ballistol is also suitable for rubber maintenance,” says Peter. “When applied thinly to bellows, rubber covers of cables or rubber mountings of the engine, the rubbers remain pliable for a long time and do not form cracks.”

If Ballistol should get on the paint of the machine, this is not a tragedy, since paints from the vehicle sector are usually insensitive to oils. I myself spray my motorcycles thinly with Ballistol oil before winter, as it reliably prevents rust film on bare metal surfaces or oxidation on aluminum. Incidentally, many museums also use it to preserve their vehicles stored in depots! In my experience, Ballistol is also ideal for removing tar and bitumen stains, so that I can do without harsh agents on my motorcycle.

Make cleaning easier with silicone spray

“If you want to get your enduro or trial classic easier to clean again after off-road use, you should spray the machine with silicone spray beforehand,” recommends Dietmar. “This is particularly popular with motocross riders because it prevents dirt from sticking to the machine. But it also works on tours with our street oldies. Exhaust or engine are taboo for silicone spray because it burns in there. “

Attachment of handles with quick cleaner

Lubricants, on the other hand, have no place in the assembly of rubber grips on the handlebars. “That is fundamentally wrong and dangerous,” warns Peter. “This means that rubber grips can slip off the handlebars even after weeks!” Fold easier and safer Attaching and removing the rubber grips with a conventional quick cleaner. To attach, spray the handlebar ends, then pull the rubber grips over the tube. After a few hours, the quick cleaner has evaporated and the handles are absolutely tight.

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Lubricate the breaker cam

Although only rarely mentioned in a lubrication plan, on machines with a circuit breaker the small felt on the cam of the mechanical centrifugal ignition adjustment should be drizzled with oil. “The felt is not used to clean the cam, but for permanent lubrication,” says Peter. “Soaking them with penetrating oil or engine oil does not help because they are too thin.”

The result is that the cam runs dry again after just a few kilometers and the breaker lugs wear out more quickly. Then the contacts have to be readjusted frequently so that the ignition works correctly. There used to be special, very viscous oils for felt. They were no longer available for a long time until Addinol reintroduced the U1500 breaker oil into its range about eight years ago. It is very viscous and is applied to the felt with an oil pen. Thanks to the high viscosity, the cam always receives sufficient lubricant.

Loosen stuck hose connections

In addition to care and cleaning, oil is also good for dismantling. For example, when pulling off old, hardened fuel or ventilation hoses, which after many years really stick to the respective pin. Instead of using a knife, Dietmar recommends using the multi-spray method, which is gentle on the material, in such cases. “Lift the hose a little with a scriber and spray the oil underneath. Even hardened hoses can then be easily pulled off with a twisting motion. ”With a little luck, the old hose can even be reused, as the oil often makes rubber pliable again. Always replace cracked hoses! As a preventive measure, it is best to coat the connection with silicone grease before installing the hose. Then you will not have any problems with peeling off later.

Seal remover with additional benefits

Dietmar has another tip for stubborn coking. This is where seal removers help, which can do more than just loosen old paper seals. “The oily liquid is ideal for removing caked oil residues, for example in oil pans, on pistons, cylinder heads or valves. To do this, spray the parts generously with sealant remover and let it work for half an hour. The coking can then be scrubbed or wiped off with a soft brush or cloth. ”Caution: Sealant remover should not get on painted parts, otherwise it will also remove the paint. In the case of stubborn coking, leave the sealant remover to work for a longer time – sometimes even overnight.

Refresh old bearing grease

All grease ages and becomes tough after a number of years. Then the corresponding component has to be dismantled, cleaned and re-greased. “It’s annoying when it happens in the middle of the season and you actually want to drive,” says Dietmar. “Especially when it concerns the steering head bearing, as viscous grease can make itself felt here through unrest in the chassis.” You can’t avoid dismantling and re-greasing this bearing, but you can delay the time a little. Dietmar: “The old grease can be ‘refreshed’, at least for a certain period of time.” To do this, spray the steering head bearing vigorously with multispray and move the handlebars from stop to stop several times until the grease has absorbed the penetrating oil. However, this should only be understood as a one-off stopgap measure, as the additional lubricant changes the viscosity of the grease!

Protect cardan components

On motorcycles with a shaft drive, the cardan shaft, compensating bushes and the cardan joints in the cardan tunnel can rust unnoticed, which particularly affects the cardan joint and the compensating sleeves. The cause is usually moisture that gets into the transmission tunnel when driving in the rain or when washing a motorcycle. As a preventive measure, the moving cardan components can be protected from rust by brushing them abundantly with grease – preferably once a year. Also lubricate the universal joint, even if the grease cannot develop its effect in the encapsulated bearings. However, it prevents the rubber seals of the bearing from becoming brittle and moisture ingress. And thus extends the service life of all components. Correct lubrication of the cardan length compensation is also important.

However, normal roller bearing grease is not suitable for this purpose, it cannot cope with the high pressures and is pushed out of the sleeve of the length compensation during operation. At this point, special high-pressure-resistant grease with a solid content is required. An “insider tip” among BMW drivers is the high-performance grease Staburags NBU 30 PTM from Kluber, a solid lubricant-containing, water-resistant assembly grease against tribocorrosion (fretting and friction rust formation), which has proven itself particularly under outdoor weather conditions with high levels of moisture. However, other high-pressure stable (!) Greases also offer alternatives – not only for the shaft drives from BMW, but also those from Guzzi & Co.

Protect fork seals

The life of fork seals can also be extended with a simple trick: If the bellows are missing, attach a thin strip of fabric, moistened with engine oil of medium viscosity, to cover the standpipe. This is held in place by the dust sleeve and picks up dust and dirt every time the fork is compressed. The sensitive sealing lips of the Simmerrings are thus permanently protected from damage and wear. Change the fabric strip more often depending on the conditions of use!

Peter has another tip for motorcycles with conventional telescopic forks: “The fork often responds badly because the Simmerrings are very tight. However, there is little that can be done about tightly fitting Simmerrings. The responsiveness of the fork can, however, be noticeably improved if the stanchions are sprayed with silicone oil and then carefully wiped off with a soft cotton cloth so that a light film of oil remains. ”This also takes care of the oil seals. You can therefore combine the above trick with the cloth strips wrapped around the standpipes with this one and wet the strips with silicone oil.

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