48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

30th photos

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Refueling, the first: placed low, easy to fill even on the side stand – the rear tank certainly has its charms.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Refueling, the second: difficult to reach with the baggage roll strapped on – fuel filler neck under the pillion seat.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Small: holds no more than tools and first-aid kits – tiny storage space in the rear of the GS.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Large: the flat cylinder bank creates space for an opulent storage compartment. Those who are used to it don’t want to be without it anymore.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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With 53 HP (Honda) and 51 HP (BMW) top performance, both 48 HP bikes are extremely good at feeding.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Around the corner: Driving pleasure is not always a question of performance. 48 hp are definitely enough for the lively line.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Honda: A simple stop for the throttle valve actuation cuts the performance.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Wet sump: Even if the dipstick is easy to reach – an oil sight glass would still be less complicated.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Dry sump: The oil tank sits under the dummy tank. The special key from the vehicle tool kit is required to check the oil level.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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BMW G 650 GS: One cylinder, no frills technology: …

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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… The single impresses with cultivated manners, the chassis with light-footed handling.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Honda NC 750 X: two cylinders, unusual technology: …

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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… The flat cylinder bank makes the Honda a universal talent. Even the Integra roller is technically based on the NC.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Combination: The analog speedometer dominates the look of the otherwise digitally held cockpit. The tachometer is difficult to read.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Digital World: The cockpit was also changed during the model revision. The gear and remaining range display is new.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Single: The single has been produced by Loncin in China since the end of 2007. The running smoothness is very good for a single cylinder, as is the durability.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Twin: The engine capacity grew from 670 to 745 cm³ during the revision. The parallel twin has a crank pin offset of 270 degrees.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X in the test

48 hp motorcycles in comparison

With more cubic capacity, the successful two-cylinder NC models are now expected to outrun the competition even further than before. The single cylinder in this class like the BMW G 650 GS anyway. Are they really doing it? A comparison with the Honda NC 750 X will tell.

E.One thing is clear: Honda sets priorities. Instead of Fireblade or Crosstourer, the Honda model planners focus on the essentials. And that currently means one thing above all for the brand with the grand piano: the 48-hp entry-level class. Since the Europe-wide introduction of the new driving license regulation last year, Honda bikes have occupied every niche there. With success. The star ensemble, the two-cylinder NC models (NC 700 S, NC 700 X), only had to admit defeat to the long-running BMW R 1200 GS in the 2013 sales hit list.

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X in the test
48 hp motorcycles in comparison

Compact seating position on the BMW G 650 GS

It is understandable that the BMW G 650 GS hardly dares to leave the underground car park. Because just a decade ago she played the role of the favorite of all beginners or those switching, and for years was one of the five best-selling bikes. Then came bitter times. Interest in good singles ebbed. From 2008 to 2010, they were no longer even offered in Germany. And even after the revival only with moderate model updates, i.e. new instruments, slimmer plastic parts and a narrower rear tank. But in spite of everything: When the car is stationary, your stew rumbles much more confidently than the heavily damped two-cylinder of the Honda NC 750 X. This also applies after the engine is no longer built by Rotax in Austria, but has been built by BMW’s Chinese partner Loncin since autumn 2007. The 652 short stroke is considered reliable and stable.

Gradually, the sound of the two no longer bounces back from the sheet metal bodies in the annoying bustle of urban traffic. The stop-and-go traffic gives way to the moderate hustle and bustle on narrow country roads. Only now are the senses ready to register the signals from the two 48-hp bikes. The BMW G 650 GS places its pilot relatively close to the handlebars. The seating position is compact, the knee angle is pleasantly open. And yet the pronounced seat recess fixes the driver almost immovably on the motorcycle. The Honda NC 750 X gives a much more generous feeling of space. No wonder, after all, nothing has changed in the chassis and peripherals of the Honda when the model changed. The comparatively flat contour of the seat leaves space for occasional changes of position, the handlebars stretch out casually, but not too far, towards the driver. The fact that the knee angle is a little more acute than on the BMW doesn’t even bother taller drivers. They are more pleased with the amount of space that makes the Honda look more grown-up than its Bavarian colleague.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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Pulling power, smooth running, fuel consumption

Tack, tack, tack, the single-cylinder BMW G 650 GS pushes you out of every curve. The single is well behaved – quite atypical for large-capacity stews. Even on 2000 tours, the short-stroke doesn’t hack the chain, doesn’t vibrate excessively, is lively, fresh and, if need be, even easy to turn. After all, the propellant turns 7400 rpm. And thus 900 revs more than the two-cylinder of the Honda NC 750 X, which already locks at 6500 rpm. What the Japanese began with the NC 700 series, the 750 expansion stage continues. Good torque, good running smoothness and – last but not least – tight fuel consumption were also at the top of the specifications for the further development. The increase in displacement by increasing the bore by four to 77 millimeters does not change anything about the low-speed concept. On the contrary. A second balancer shaft, changed timing and revised combustion chambers should ensure even better concentricity and more homogeneous pressure, especially in the speed basement. And do it too.

In direct comparison with the test bench values ​​of the 700 series, the Honda NC 750 X delivers around eight Newton meters more torque in every speed range. OK then. Because the propellant is not only more potent, but also livelier, depends more spontaneously on the gas and benefits across the board from the engine displacement. Ultimately, with this evolution, the three-quarter-liter engine also sheds some of the marine diesel character of the 700 series. So that no false hope arises: The steam locomotive has still not turned into an ICE. The parallel twin, which works like a V2 engine with a 270 degree crank pin offset, still feels most comfortable at moderate engine speeds, likes it when the pilot upshifts early. The Honda NC 750 X could implement its additional pep even more impressively. But first of all, the speed limiter intervenes early, and secondly, the longer secondary ratio – instead of the 16-tooth drive pinion in the NC 700, a pinion with 17 teeth is installed – slows down the newly gained vigor. The fact that the performance-reduced test machine stands extremely well in the forage does little to change that. With 53 hp, the throttling maxes out the scope of the permissible measuring tolerance.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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Honda NC 750 X can be delayed easily

But as long as things stay tight, the Honda NC 750 X has to hurry up anyway. The BMW G 650 GS throws its sports figure into the balance, especially in the winding terrain. Half a hundredweight separates the 198 kilogram Bavarian woman with a full tank from the 223 kilogram Japanese woman. With its narrow 19/17 inch tires, the GS bends neatly around the corners. Once again, it shows how efficiently narrow tires promote handling. The GS rider should only cool his cornering fever in left turns. The side stand touches down quite early, especially on bumps. But as soon as the bends open up, the GS does not benefit from the weight advantage, tires or the 63 millimeter shorter wheelbase. Because what the Honda NC 750 X may lack in agility, it makes up for with superior calm and great steering precision.

The spring elements not only smoothly smooth bumpy slopes, but also keep the Honda NC 750 X well balanced with their homogeneous coordination. Of course it is not. Because apart from the spring preload of the shock absorber, the fork and monoshock cannot be adjusted. Greetings from the controller that is determined to be particularly tight-knit when calculating the NC. The comfort of the BMW G 650 GS is also okay. After all, the spring base can be adjusted in a practical way using a handwheel. The fact that the adjustment screw of the rebound damping of the Sachs shock absorber only reacts in the last four turns and the fork cannot be adjusted at all is probably due to the cost pressure itself. Her braking system must also pay tribute to this. The simple floating caliper brakes only convey a spongy pressure point, need a strong pull on the lever for committed decelerations and therefore have to be clearly distanced from the stoppers of the Honda NC 750 X. They prove that even a single disc in the front wheel is enough to slow down a bike with moderate manual force and easy to dose. By the way: In extreme cases, the ABS also regulates more finely than that of the GS.

Honda NC 750 X runs 168 km / h, BMW G 650 GS 171 km / h

In the meantime, the country road has stretched into a dead straight path. Switch through, turn it off. Sure, with 48 hp nobody gets into the rush of speed. Nevertheless, the BMW G 650 GS runs a measured 171 km / h and the Honda NC 750 X 168 km / h. However: While the Bavarian pulls through seamlessly to top speed, the Honda struggles with it. Its sixth gear is clearly designed as a speed-lowering overdrive. Incidentally, the reason why the NC is separated from the GS by lengths when the draft is generally measured in the last gear. In real life, the NC driver simply shifts to fifth, in which the Honda also reaches its top speed. It’s amazing how efficiently the small panes protect against wind pressure even at these speeds. Still, Autobahnbolzen is definitely not one of the duo’s domains. Maybe refuel? The BMW G 650 GS swallows 3.4 liters of fuel, the Honda NC 750 X two tenths less. Values ​​that in their own way contribute to the fun on these machines.

As is the luggage storage. At least with the Honda NC 750 X. Because the cylinder bank is tilted 62 degrees forwards – ultimately the technical prerequisite for building the Integra scooter on the platform of the NC models – the Honda offers a spacious overhead compartment in the dummy tank. Once you have got used to the practical and easily accessible storage space, you may not want to mess around with a helmet lock or tank bag. Especially since the rational independence of the NC 750 X is still documented in what is probably the most powerful argument: the price. At 6755 euros (including ancillary costs), the Honda remains financially attractive even after the technical upgrade – and just under 1000 euros below the tariff of the similarly equipped BMW G 650 GS, which costs 7690 euros.

But in the end it is not the financial aspect that secures the Honda NC 750 X victory against the BMW G 650 GS. And also not the increased displacement. It is the universal and mature concept of the NC 750 X, which is superior to the BMW, above all because of the cultivated and unobtrusive two-cylinder engine, no matter how well-bred the single in the G 650 GS may be. Obviously it helps to set priorities.

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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Data and measured values

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test
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Pictures: BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

fact

48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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48 hp BMW G 650 GS and Honda NC 750 X motorcycles in the test

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Performance measurement

Power on the crankshaft. Measurements on the Dynojet roller test stand 250, corrected according to 95/1 / EG, maximum possible deviation ± 5%.

With 53 HP (Honda NC 750 X) and 51 HP (BMW G 650 GS) top performance, both 48 HP motorcycles are extremely good at feeding. Nevertheless: With these values, your motors are still within the tolerable range (see article page 4). What cannot be seen on the diagram: With the increase in displacement from 670 to 745 cm³, the Honda NC 750 generates around 8 Nm more torque than its predecessor NC 700 over the entire speed range. It is unusual that the BMW Single has a speed limit of 7400 rpm that is 900 rpm higher than the theoretically more revving two-cylinder engine of the Honda.

Tolerance or throttle?


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Honda: A simple stop for the throttle valve actuation cuts the performance.

With 51 hp (BMW G 650 GS) and 53 hp (Honda NC 750 X) top performance, both machines in this comparison test clearly exceed the 48 hp limit. But precisely because of this, the question arises: Are these machines even legal for the A2 driving license? The answer: it is you. After all, the legislature allows an additional performance of five percent through the series spread. The measurement tolerance of a further five percent permitted for measurements on dynamometers must be added to this result. Results in a limit of 52.92 hp, rounded up to 53 hp. While the BMW G already fits into the 48 hp class without any changes, more powerful machines such as the Honda NC 750 specified in the standard trim with 55 hp rated power have to be reduced in power by a retrofitted mechanical throttle valve travel limitation (Alpha technology, 105 euros) will.

MOTORCYCLE scoring

engine maximum number of points        BMW G 650 GS      Honda NC 750 X
Draft 40 12th 5
acceleration 40 10 8th
Top speed 30th 7th 5
Engine characteristics     30th 15th 18th
Responsiveness 20th 12th 13
Load change 20th 14th 14th
Smoothness 20th 9 13
coupling 10 8th 8th
circuit 20th 11 11
Gear ratio 10 8th 8th
Start 10 7th 8th
total 250 113 111

The BMW points win is deceptive. Because the Honda NC 750 X loses the decisive points due to the weak torque in its sixth gear, which is translated as overdrive. Nevertheless: The BMW single impresses with good performance. In terms of smoothness and engine characteristics, the concept of the single cylinder has to subordinate itself to the twin of the Honda.

Winner engine: BMW G 650 GS

landing gear maximum number of points      BMW G 650 GS     Honda NC 750 X
Handiness 40 32 27
Stability in turns 40 25th 28
Steering behavior 40 25th 27
feedback 10 6th 6th
Inclined position 20th 12th 17th
Straight-line stability 20th 15th 17th
Suspension tuning in front 20th 12th 12th
Chassis set-up at the rear 20th 13 14th
Adjustment options undercarriage     10 4th 1
Suspension comfort 10 7th 6th
Driving behavior with a passenger 20th 11 13
total 250 162 168

With bustling handling The BMW G 650 GS remains true to its fresh character in terms of chassis too. The Honda NC 750 X counters with stable straight-line stability, precise steering behavior and well-balanced suspension. However, the cost pressure on the NC is visible in the spring elements. The setting options are minimal.

Chassis winner: Honda NC 750 X

everyday life maximum number of points BMW G 650 GS
Honda NC 750 X
Ergonomics driver 40 26th 28
Ergonomics pillion 20th 13 11
Windbreak 20th 6th 5
view 20th 12th 13
light 20th 13 12th
Furnishing 30th 11 12th
Handling / maintenance     30th 19th 15th
Luggage storage 10 4th 5
Payload 10 4th 7th
Range 30th 26th 29
processing 20th 11 13
total 250 145 150

With successful, adult-looking ergonomics The Honda NC 750 X is convincing. Despite the need to save money, the NC looks valuable. The windbreak could be better, but it’s surprisingly efficient on both models. The low consumption ensures despite
a moderate 14 liter tank capacity for an impressive range of over 400 kilometers.

Winner everyday life: Honda NC 750 X

security maximum number of points BMW G 650 GS Honda NC 750 X
Braking effect 40 21st 26th
Brake metering 30th 16 21st
Braking with a passenger / fading 20th 9 12th
Righting moment when braking     10 9 8th
ABS function 20th 11 13
Handlebar slapping 20th 19th 19th
Ground clearance 10 8th 8th
total 150 93 107

The brakes are – besides the smoothness – the only one The weak point of the BMW. With high manual force and moderate controllability, the GS brakes are clearly inferior to the stoppers of the Honda NC 750 X..

Safety winner: Honda NC 750 X

costs maximum number of points BMW G 650 GS Honda NC 750 X
guarantee 30th 17th 15th
Consumption (country road)   30th 27 28
Inspection costs 20th 17th 19th
Maintenance costs 20th 17th 16
total 100 78 78

The low consumption is the strength of the duo: 3.4 liters (BMW), 3.2 liters (Honda) are a word.

Winner costs: BMW G 650 GS / Honda NC 750 X

maximum number of points BMW G 650 GS Honda NC 750 X
Overall rating 1000 591 614
placement 2. 1.
Price-performance note    1.0 1.9 1.3

Price-performance winner: Honda NC 750 X
Little money, a lot of motorcycle: top grade for the Honda

MOTORCYCLE test results

Honda NC 750 X
The Honda NC 750 X impresses with its adult-looking overall package, which benefits again from the additional displacement. There’s rarely so much motorcycle for the money.

BMW G 650 GS
A single rarely has a chance against a two-cylinder concept. Nevertheless: The handy BMW G 650 GS makes a lot of its single-cylinder existence – above all a lot of driving pleasure.

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