Bimota DB6R Delirio review

Bimota DB6R Delirio review
Artist

Bimota DB6R Delirio review

Italian noble substance

If you want to turn 22,000 euros into a dream of a motorcycle, you will find it at Bimota. With the DB6R Delirio, the Riminese build a fun mobile for the well-heeled.

A 90 hp motorcycle for 21,953 euros? Crazy? No, Bimota. Italian noble material for people with a great sense for something special.

But let’s leave the money out of the picture. Let’s forget that for so much cash you could get a brand new Honda Fireblade plus a Ducati Monster 696. There is no need to deal with a Bimota with reason. But with passion. And enjoyment of the unusual design, the brilliant craftsmanship and a sound that large-scale manufacturers would no longer get over the hurdles of EC approval. How it roars throatily when accelerating, babbling lasciviously when coasting and roaring to itself in idle, gigantic. V2 sound design at its best.

In terms of performance, the sound orgy has brought nothing. A more subtle Ducati Hypermotard with the same 1100 engine pushes two more horsepower towards the rear wheel. Still, you don’t miss anything on country roads. Between 3000 and 7000 revolutions the V2 feels right at home, offers a spontaneous bite and performs enough to be really fast on the road. Especially since the widely spread, slightly long geared and easily shiftable six-speed gearbox always has the right gear ready. Shifting is fun with the DB6R, you can go up the gears if necessary without a clutch, just with a short interruption in tractive power. Shifting down with double-declutching conjures up the most beautiful cascades of sound from the two exhaust end pieces. And that brings us to the heart of the story.

Curve hunting


Artist

Forged wheels, best brembos, open dry clutch.

The Bimota whirls like no other over the country road. With a full tank of 195 kilograms, the slim Italian beauty can be brutally chased through the curves. What did the name Bimota stand for in the 80s? excellent chassis ??, that embodies the new DB6R. And sets it far above the Ducati already mentioned above. Outstanding handiness, but still a full driving experience. Neutral in any inclined position, but stubbornly straight ahead. Good feedback, enough swallow reserves even on bad surfaces. And the fact that all these great features are conjured up by a really nicely finished and uniquely elaborate tubular space frame with a wonderfully fat fork and filigree tubular space frame fits into the company’s longstanding tradition.

But as always with Bimota, there are some things that stand in the way of real perfection. Worst of all: the bench. What do Robbiano allow? The Bimota designer cannot be a motorcyclist. He builds the shortest bench in the world. Who should feel comfortable on it? Combined with the unfortunate shape of the tank, driving pleasure quickly turns into constant pain. A little less bad: the dry clutch. Their rattling may be quite funny, the high hand strength and the annoying plucking when engaging the clutch are definitely not. Especially since the DB6R is lightning fast on the rear wheel in first gear. Still acceptable: the shock absorber, the compression damping of which has to be turned all the way down in order to still dampen well even during longer driving times. Because unfortunately it sits directly above the manifold of the standing cylinder and heats up very strongly.

Nagged enough. Picked up the nicely clamped, butted handlebars and accelerated heartily. And the 21,953 euros? But in some shops there is just one watch that is definitely only good for looking at.

Plus minus

plus
– Performance comes cleanly in the middle
– Chassis very handy and neutral
– Processing lovingly down to the last detail

minus
– Dry clutch pulls, is difficult
– Seat too short
– Cold run bad, difficult to start

Technical data Bimota DB6R Delirio

engine
Air-cooled two-cylinder four-stroke 90-degree V-engine, one overhead, toothed belt-driven camshaft, two valves per cylinder, desmodromic actuation, wet sump lubrication, injection, regulated catalytic converter, 520 W alternator, 12 V / 10 Ah battery, mechanically actuated multiple discs -Dry clutch, six-speed gearbox, O-ring chain.
Bore x stroke 98.0 x 71.5 mm
Cubic capacity 1079 cm³
Rated output 70.0 kW (95 PS) at 7000 rpm
Max. Torque 103 Nm at 5500 rpm

landing gear
Steel tubular frame, load-bearing motor, upside-down fork, Ø 50 mm, adjustable spring base, rebound and compression damping, tubular steel rocker arm, central spring strut, directly hinged, adjustable spring base, rebound and compression damping, double disc brake at the front, Ø 320 mm, four-piston -Fixed calipers, rear disc brake, Ø 220 mm, two-piston fixed caliper.
Cast aluminum wheels 3.50 x 17; 5.50 x 17
Tires 120/70 ZR 17; 180/55 ZR 17
Tires in the Continental Race Attack test

Dimensions + weights
Wheelbase 1425 mm, steering head angle 66.0 degrees, caster 100 mm, spring travel f / r 120/130 mm, seat height * 840 mm, weight with a full tank * 195 kg, payload * 165 kg, tank capacity 17.0 liters
Two year guarantee
Color white
Price 21,658 euros
Additional costs 295 euros

Readings
Performance
acceleration
0 100 km / h 3.6 sec
0 ?? 140 km / h 6.2 sec
0 200 km / h 17.6 sec

Draft
60 ?? 100 km / h 4.5 sec
100 ?? 140 km / h 4.2 sec
140 180 km / h 5.7 sec

Speedometer deviation
Effective (display 50/100) 47/95 km / h

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