BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
Judd

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

26th photos

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
Nicolaou

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In the supersports comparison test: Kawasaki ZX-10R, BMW S 1000 RR, Suzuki GSX-R 1000, Honda Fireblade C-ABS and Yamaha YZF-R1.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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Kawasaki ZX-10R, BMW S 1000 RR, Honda Fireblade, Yamaha YZF-R1, Suzuki GSX-R 1000.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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BMW S 1000 RR

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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Chic – the gills look good and improve the ventilation of the BMW.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The BMW cockpit.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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With the best ABS in the test field at BMW, even wet and greasy country roads lose their horror.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The BMW S 1000 RR.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The super athletes are waiting to be used on the racetrack.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The sensor rim on the rear wheel supplies the traction control with impulses, the Tokico stoppers act confidently.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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Good brakes from Tokico on the Kawasaki.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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Lime green in its most beautiful form. The ZX-10R looks sleek and drives like it.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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On the rear wheel: Kawasaki ZX-10R.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The athletes from Yamaha, Suzuki, Honda, Kawasaki and BMW belong here – on the racing track.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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Yamaha YZF-R1

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The brakes on the Yamaha could be more snappy.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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But the sound that leaves these two pots at Yamaha is right.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The Yamaha on the racetrack.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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On the racetrack: Suzuki GSX-R 1000, Yamaha YZF-R1, Kawasaki ZX-10R, BMW S 1000 RR and Honda CBR 1000 RR Fireblade C-ABS.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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Honda CBR 1000 RR Fireblade C-ABS.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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White wheels on the Honda are the horror of every mechanic.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The Blade’s cockpit is poorly equipped, all others offer more information.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The Honda CBR 1000 RR Fireblade C-ABS.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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Suzuki GSX-R 1000

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The front brake on the Suzuki is blunt.

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
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The Suzuki GSX-R 1000 in an inclined position.

Superbikes 2011 in comparison test

Super sports cars from BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha

Content of

The 2011 superbikes with their inline four-cylinder. Can the long-awaited Kawasaki ZX-10R dethrone the BMW S 1000 RR? How do Honda Firebalde, Suzuki GSX-R 1000 and Yamaha YZF-R1 compare?

It’s not just about honor, no way! No, it’s more about the principle, which is why the Far Eastern motorcycle empire must now fight back with all its might. It is not acceptable for someone to come from there, especially a sedate Central European like BMW, to copy everything and then make it even better. Outrageous, this Japanese principle of the "copy and do better" easy to take over. The copiers copy!

The Japanese eyed the BMW S 1000 RR’s appearance last year with suspicion. After all, so far they have tolerated all European superbike activities and their V-Zwei variations, ignoring the ridiculous numbers of an MV Agusta. But when the BMW, powered by a potent inline four-cylinder engine, began to tear the Superbike armada up in the air with one arm, the alarm bells rang. It was immediately clear that Nippon’s response to this attack on her very core competence would be cruel. The only question that remained was who of the big four would be the first to strike back. Yamaha and Suzuki were out of the question, as their GSX-R 1000 and YZF-R1 are barely more than two years old. So Honda or Kawasaki have to work to stop the German mischief. But in view of the overwhelming power of BMW and the Japanese development cycles, this can be achieved at all?

After all, it takes about three years for an athlete, from the first line in the specifications to the market launch. And three years ago, after all, the Japanese had no idea that, and above all, what kind of BMW superbike they would be facing.

JNow it is there, the Far Eastern stake that is to be rammed into the heart of the German poacher. Embodied by the Kawasaki ZX-10R, a well-trained ninja in a green robe, combative and motivated to the tips of your hair.

Revolutionary things could be heard in advance of the Kawasaki development. The ZX-10R was designed by chief engineer Yoda (who used to be the developer of the MotoGP-M1 at Yamaha) primarily for use in the Superbike World Championship, and only secondarily for road use. However, this would mean a U-turn in the Japanese development philosophy. On closer inspection, however, only one detail speaks for this departure from the previous Japanese development strategy, the cassette gear. All other features point to evolution rather than revolution.

Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R – The Green One
The most important goal was to hire, or even better, to trump Bavarian power. The Kawa press kit announces full-bodied 200.1 HP at 13,000 rpm, with Ram-Air even 209.9 HP, while BMW is content with 193 HP in the vehicle registration. With this, the Green has achieved the ratio of 1 kg per HP, which is important from a marketing point of view, at least in theory. In other ways, too, the tens do not spoil, and will soon even compete with a modern Bosch ABS. But back to the test motorcycle. This still has to compete without an anti-lock device and, at 200 kg, weighs eight kilos less than the BMW. However, it also activates "just" 197 horses on the roll, while the BMW mobilizes 202 hp. So the peg is a paper tiger? Please do not!

What else do you notice? The Kawa engine became more compact, following the trend of mass centralization, which is why the gear shafts now run one above the other. This saves installation length, creates space for a longer, traction-enhancing swing arm and moves the engine’s center of gravity a little higher. The bore / stroke ratio was adopted unchanged from the old engine, but the valve diameter on the inlet side grew by one millimeter to 31 mm. The inlet ducts are polished, the exhaust ducts revised. Everything points to clean head work, as the new camshafts ensure longer opening times and thus better cylinder filling. Otherwise comes "ordinary" Further development to wear. Every gram was fought over on moving parts, friction reduced to a minimum.


Nicolaou

On the rear wheel: Kawasaki ZX-10R.

State-of-the-art electronics in the engine peripherals. Double throttle valves and two strips of injection nozzles for mixture preparation, lambda probe and G-Kat for exhaust gas disposal. The driver has three different ignition maps that can be adjusted while driving, a traction control (S-KTRC) that can also be set in three stages, and an anti-hopping clutch.

The Kawasaki chassis became three kilos lighter, the swing arm 20 mm longer. A Showa Big Piston Fork and the tried and tested Tokico four-piston brake calipers now work at the front, while the hindquarters are supported by an almost lying strut. That is supposed to be for a more constant

The damping behavior ensures that the shock absorber is no longer heated as much by the engine heat in this installation position. So much for theory. The fact is that the Kawa engineers failed to put an extra-long screwdriver in the tool kit. The compression and rebound damping valves are difficult or impossible to reach (with on-board tools) and the shock absorber is heavily thrown with dirt when it rains, despite the splash guard. The height-adjustable footrests and the tried and tested steering damper should also be mentioned positively.

The others
Anyone who thinks BMW is resting on the newly earned laurels of the S 1000 RR is mistaken. After the criticism of the aggressive power output, BMW reacted in June 2010 and has since installed a crankshaft that was tried and tested in the SBK World Championship and found to be good, 575 grams heavier. Nobody noticed it, except for the racing drivers who developed this crankshaft version. This example shows, however, that Bayern are constantly adjusting and are constantly improving the RR package. And if you change crankshafts without communicating this, who knows what is being reprogrammed in the electronics area and improved in the course of inspections.

At Honda, Suzuki and Yamaha there was a lull in 2011, modifications to Fireblade, GSX-R 1000 and YZF-R1 were limited, if at all, to new decors. Is that enough to stand up to the strengthened Kawasaki?

Highway test

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test
26th photos

Pictures: Superbikes 2011 in comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

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BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

Nicolaou

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

Nicolaou

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

Nicolaou

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

Nicolaou

BMW, Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki and Yamaha super sports cars in a comparison test

Nicolaou

But she is not alone with this phenomenon. The stoppers of the GSX-R also get down to business like those of a chopper from the eighties. It looks tired and slack and doesn’t really fit the image of a model athlete. Like its brake, the entire GSX-R 1000 lacks sharpness and profile. With the Kilo-Gixxer you can ride calmly through the wet, its likewise gently responding motor pushes in a controlled and powerful manner anytime and anywhere, releasing whatever propulsive power the driver calls. Never more, but never less. Even on the very narrow Spanish country roads there is no reason to leave the standard mapping "A." into soft mapping "B." or even into rain mapping "C." switch. (This was not necessary on the Suzuki, the Kawasaki or the BMW.) The size of the Suzuki, however, takes some getting used to. Your seating position feels old, the driver is accommodated a little stretched. Coupled with the sluggish handling, this makes the Suzi appear bigger and heavier than she really is. Its 208 kg mass is on par with BMW and Honda (208 and 209 kg), but the GSX-R still needs a stronger hand in alternating curves.

Truly surprisingly, the Honda whizzes through the field. You don’t notice the four model years under her belt. The slightly higher rear tires (190/55 instead of 190/50) used on all motorcycles in the test will certainly benefit her. It scurries light-footedly and very precisely over the looped asphalt strip, allows sporty late braking maneuvers thanks to its C-ABS and thus unleashes the instinct to play despite the poor road conditions. The hard throttle response and the pronounced load changes of the blade are annoying because it hasn’t been switched off for four years. If this were not the case, the Honda could become a rain queen, but the throttle flaps of the mid-speed four-cylinder engine at the corner exit have to be opened very sensitively. The question arises: Why doesn’t Honda manage to give its most important athlete a smooth injection setting in four years, while BMW is replacing crankshafts in a completely unbureaucratic way?

Speaking of BMW. It does a very good job despite its sporty engine. Anyone who thinks that this is only due to traction control is wrong. Will this on in the wet "Race" left, you notice that it hardly comes into the control range. The thrust of the S 1000 RR can be accessed with confidence, apart from the very stiff throttle grip of the test bike and the less than perfect response. Your brake, the fine seating position and the good response behavior of the dampers do the rest to let the pilot race through the lousy weather with a lot of fun.

And the kawa? She just drives after the BMW, even without ABS. Because your brake brakes as it should be for an athlete, sharply but controllably. Turning in is easy and the manners of the engine, which runs very rough between 4000 and 6000 revs, allow an early throttle opening. However, there could be more thrust in the lower and middle speed range. A look at the torque values ​​attest the ZX-10R together with the GSX-R the red lantern. However, this is not a fault of the engine, but is clearly due to the too long secondary transmission.

Racetrack test


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The athletes from Yamaha, Suzuki, Honda, Kawasaki and BMW belong here – on the racing track.

Racetrack
Finally the sun is shining. Open the tap and go. Honda, Suzuki and Yamaha got their clamp from BMW last year, but are no less motivated to compete again. The Honda is the first to plunge into the hustle and bustle, shines with its great handling and burns a clean time on the asphalt. She is followed by Suzi, who is good-natured, as on the country road, but also very lazy. The driver almost has to force a change of direction on it. The lag behind the Honda is therefore not surprising, although the Gixxer engine can convince. Next one, please! The R1 thunders off. Accompanied by a greedy sound, it burns down the slopes, but scares the driver off for lack of feedback. You never know exactly where you are on it. Despite proper handling and its short gear ratio, it just doesn’t work out with decent lap times. You always lack the necessary trust in liability. The Kawasaki can do that much better.

It has a great grip, feeds the driver with all the necessary information on the state of grip and, thanks to TC, confidently catches slides. However, she suffered from chattering in the long left arc of Almeria, which could never be completely turned off during the test. A highlight of the ZX-10R is its braking stability. With no bike does it brake later than with her. Not even with the BMW. And it has to stretch quite a bit to iron the green. During a brisk ride, your TC engages itself in the "Race"-Mode more often and more noticeably than that of the Kawa in their level "1". Nevertheless: In the end, the S 1000 RR successfully outperforms the ZX-10R by a few tenths. The winner’s cup belongs to BMW once again, but dominance is waning. And who knows what else will come from Japan.

Lap times Almeria


archive

Green: Section 1, Blue: Section 2, Yellow: Section 3, Red: Section 4 (top speed).

"When the flag drops, bullshit stops", says the Englishman. In other words, once in the circular path full tank on the way, and the excuses of the paddock no longer count. PS has been using a GPS-based lap timer since the last issue to be able to analyze the test laps in more detail. Regular readers and subscribers will notice that the lap times of this comparison test are significantly slower than those of the European comparison test (PS 2/11, "amateur"-Times). On the one hand this is due to the tires, this time PS didn’t use slicks, but street-legal hypersport skins, and on the other hand to the track, which developed significantly less grip than in the week after Christmas.

Notes on the lap times table: The difference between the real and the ideal lap time is sometimes very large, which is explained by the fact that the times during training – intercourse with other participants – were recorded – so there were occasional disabilities. The ideal lap time is made up of the best sectors of all stopped laps and shows the true potential of the motorcycles without traffic or driving errors by the driver. The distance between the BMW and the second-fastest Kawa-saki proves what an animal weapon the S 1000 RR is on the race. In terms of top speed, however, the Kawa is on.

Driver: Robert Glück Lap time in minutes: Section 1 * Section 2 * Section 3 * Section 4 * Ideal lap time **  Top speed
BMW 
S 1000 RR 1.47.87 33.55 s 24.33 s 15.64 s 33.25 s 1.46.78 263 km / h
Kawasaki 
ZX-10 R 1.48.00 33.55 s 24.56 s 15.84 s 33.36 s 1.47.32 262 km / h
Honda 
Fireblade C-ABS 1.48.00 33.52 s 24.57 s 15.67 s 33.80 s 1.47.57 252 km / h
Suzuki 
GSX-R 1000 1.48.67 33.31 s 24.39 s 15.90 s 34.16 s 1.47.78 250 km / h
Yamaha 
YZF-R1 1.49.32 33.79 s 24.88 s 15.88 s 34.48 s 1.49.04 246 km / h

PS – evaluation / judgment


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The BMW S 1000 RR.

PS rating

 Max. Points  BMW  Honda  Kawasaki  Suzuki  Yamaha
Total buzzer  250  208  190  192  179  181 placement    1.  3.  2.  5.  4th.

1. BMW S 1000 RR
With the in-line four-cylinder engines, there is still no way around the BMW. Without any major weaknesses, the S 1000 RR dominates the field at will, scooping up fat points above all thanks to its incredible power.

2. Kawasaki ZX-10R
With the 2011 tens, Kawa is finally returning to the brand’s sporting virtues. Even if it’s not quite enough to win, the ZX-10R is finally a bike again to be proud of.

3. Honda Fireblade C-ABS
Hats off to the blade! Thanks to its balance, it does well in the test, but the ABS does not hide its otherwise poor equipment. A gear display and slipper clutch are definitely missing.

4. Yamaha YZF-R1
Thanks to the PS-TunerGP, I know the real potential of the R1. In the standard trim it is a great country road motorcycle, but difficult to set up on the racetrack because it is generally very soft.

5. Suzuki GSX-R 1000
Uff, the Gixxer is not a bad motorcycle, just not as good as the rest. Its engine is good, but the packaging is old-fashioned, its handling is massive. She is good-natured, but also clumsy and sluggish.

Readings


archive

The performance diagram of the super athlete.

Wow, the Kawasaki only mobilizes five horsepower less than the BMW – respect! However, it lags behind the S 1000 RR over the entire speed range. Between 9000 and 10 000 tours, its entire 10 hp is missing, but what weighs more heavily is that the BMW generates up to 10 Nm more torque from 7400 rpm to 12 300 rpm. The Fireblade’s torque and power curve is also impressive. As soon as it has overcome its drop at 4000 rpm, it is at the top of the field in the speed range that is relevant for everyday use – between 5500 and 9000 revolutions. In terms of maximum output, Suzuki, Honda and Yamaha meet at around 171 hp, but the increase in output for Suzuki and Honda is very linear, while the curve of the Yamaha flattens out significantly between 9500 and 10 000 rpm and between 10 000 and 13 000 rpm.

 Acceleration*
(0-100/150/200 km / h)
 Draft*
(50-100 / 100-150 km / h)
 Top speed ** BMW
 3.1 / 4.9 / 6.9 s   4.3 / 4.1 s  299 km / h Honda  3.3 / 5.2 / 7.5 s   4.5 / 3.6 s  293 km / h Kawasaki  3.3 / 4.9 / 7.2 s  4.6 / 4.0 s  295 km / h Suzuki
 3.2 / 5.2 / 7.6 s  4.5 / 4.1 s  295 km / h Yamaha  3.2 / 5.1 / 7.5 s   4.0 / 3.9 s  285 km / h

* PS measured value, ** manufacturer information

 


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The test winner, the BMW S 1000 RR.

BMW S 1000 RR

drive 
Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 142 kW (193 hp) at 13,000 / min *, 112 Nm at 9750 / min *, 999 cm³, bore / stroke: 80.0 / 52.3 mm, compression ratio: 13, 0: 1, ignition / injection system, 48 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain, traction control

landing gear 
Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.1 degrees, caster: 96 mm, wheelbase: 1432 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 48 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression (high / low). Suspension travel front / rear: 120/130 mm

Wheels and brakes 
Cast light alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 “/ 6.00 x 17”, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/55 ZR 17, test tires: Dunlop D 211 GP Racer in “M” and “E”, 320 mm -Double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear, ABS

measurements and weight 

Length / width / height: 2080/785/1110 mm, seat / handlebar height: 810/865 mm, handlebar width: 660 mm, 208 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 52.0 / 48.0%
 
Rear wheel power in last gear

137.5 kW (187 hp) at 282 km / h

consumption
 
Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 8.6 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 17.5 liters, range: 203 km

Base price
 
15 800 euros (plus ancillary costs, special paint 475 euros, shift assistant 360 euros, Race ABS + DTC 1220 euros)


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The Honda CBR 1000 RR Fireblade C-ABS.

Honda Fireblade C-ABS

drive
Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 131 kW (178 PS) at 11,200 / min *, 112 Nm at 8500 / min *, 1000 cm³, bore / stroke: 76.0 / 55.1 mm, compression ratio: 12, 3: 1, ignition / injection system, 46 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain

landing gear
Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.8 degrees, caster: 96 mm, wheelbase: 1410 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm, adjustable spring base, rebound and compression level. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension travel front / rear: 120/135 mm

Wheels and brakes
Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17 “/ 6.00 x 17”, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/55 ZR 17, test tires: Dunlop D 211 GP Racer in “M” and “E”, 320 mm -Double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear, C-ABS

measurements and weight
Length / width / height: 2090/830/1130 mm, seat / handlebar height: 815/860 mm, handlebar width: 650 mm, 209 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 51.8 / 48.2%

Rear wheel power in last gear
120.8 kW (164 hp) at 257 km / h

consumption
Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 8.5 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 17.7 liters, range: 208 km

Base price 
14,990 euros (plus ancillary costs, C-ABS 1000 euros, special paint 200 euros)


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The Kawasaki ZX-10R.

Kawasaki ZX-10 R

drive
Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 147 kW (200 PS) at 13,000 rpm *, 112 Nm at 11,500 rpm *, 998 cm³, bore / stroke: 76.0 / 55.0 mm, compression ratio: 13 , 0: 1, ignition / injection system, 47 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain, traction control

landing gear
Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 65.0 degrees, caster: 107 mm, wheelbase: 1425 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm, adjustable spring base, rebound and compression level. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression (high / low). Suspension travel front / rear: 120/140 mm

Wheels and brakes

Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17 “/ 6.00 x 17”, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/55 ZR 17, test tires: Dunlop D 211 GP Racer in “M” and “E”, 310 mm -Double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear

measurements and weight
Length / width / height: 2130/900/1130 mm, seat / handlebar height: 810/850 mm, handlebar width: 655 mm, 200 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 51.5 / 48.5%

Rear wheel power in last gear
134.5 kW (183 PS) at 283 km / h

consumption
Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 8.3 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 17.0 liters, range: 205 km

Base price
15 495 euros (plus ancillary costs)


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The Suzuki GSX-R 1000 in an inclined position.

Suzuki GSX-R 1000

drive

Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 136 kW (185 hp) at 12,000 rpm *, 117 Nm at 10,000 rpm *, 999 cm³, bore / stroke: 74.5 / 57.3 mm, compression ratio: 12 , 5: 1, ignition / injection system, 44 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain

landing gear
Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.5 degrees, caster: 98 mm, wheelbase: 1405 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm, adjustable spring base, rebound and compression level. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression (high / low). Suspension travel front / rear: 125/130 mm

Wheels and brakes
Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17 “/ 6.00 x 17”, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/55 ZR 17, test tires: Dunlop D 211 GP Racer in “M” and “E”, 310 mm -Double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear

measurements and weight
Length / width / height: 2120/970/1150 mm, seat / handlebar height: 810/860 mm, handlebar width: 635 mm, 208 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 51.0 / 49.0%

Rear wheel power in last gear
120 kW (163 PS) at 251 km / h

consumption
Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 8.5 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 17.5 liters, range: 206 km

Base price
13,990 euros (plus ancillary costs)


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The Yamaha on the racetrack.

Yamaha YZF-R1

drive
Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 134 kW (182 PS) at 12,500 / min *, 116 Nm at 10,000 / min *, 998 cm³, bore / stroke: 78.0 / 52.2 mm, compression ratio: 12 , 7: 1, ignition / injection system, 45 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain

landing gear
Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.0 degrees, caster: 102 mm, wheelbase: 1415 mm, upside-down fork, Ø inner fork tube: 43 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression stage, central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, Rebound and compression level (high / low). Suspension travel front / rear: 120/120 mm

Wheels and brakes
Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17 “/ 6.00 x 17”, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/55 ZR 17, test tires: Dunlop D 211 GP Racer in “M” and “E”, 310 mm -Double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear

measurements and weight
Length / width / height: 2090/775/1120 mm, seat / handlebar height: 820/840 mm, handlebar width: 650 mm, 214 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 52.3 / 47.7%

Rear wheel power in last gear
117 kW (159 PS) at 263 km / h

consumption
Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 8.7 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 18.0 liters, range: 207 km

Base price
15 495 euros (plus ancillary costs)

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