Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
Suzuki

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750

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Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
Suzuki

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Suzuki GSX-S 750

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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The LCD cockpit offers a wealth of information. It comes from the GSX-S 1000

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
Suzuki

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Stylish ten-spoke alloy wheels, new swing arm, sporty Bridgestone S21 tires

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
Suzuki

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The four-piston radial brake calipers impress with their power and fine controllability

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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Suzuki GSX-S 750

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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No comparison to its rounded predecessor: the GSX-S 750 makes it look sporty

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
Suzuki

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Suzuki GSX-S 750.

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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Suzuki GSX-S 750.

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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Suzuki GSX-S 750.

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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Suzuki GSX-S 750.

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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Suzuki GSX-S 750.

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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Suzuki GSX-S 750.

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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Suzuki GSX-S 750.

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
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Suzuki GSX-S 750.

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750

Offspring in the middle class

The offspring in the middle class: Suzuki is evolving its naked bike from the three-quarter-liter class into a cheeky corner whistler. With more power, fine-tuning, equipment and character than before, the competition is to be taught how to tilt with the Suzuki GSX-S 750. If it works?

Let’s start with a little digression: According to the internet encyclopedia, “Apex Predator” is the term used in biology for a biological species that is at the top of the food pyramid in its ecosystem. What about motorcycles and the new Suzuki GSX-S 750 has to do? Well, “Apex Predator” as a motorcyclist could also be translated as “vertex hunter”. And let’s not talk around the bush for long: Building good motorcycles is no longer a guarantee for huge sales. In addition to price and performance, credibility and character are more important than ever. Like it or not: That’s the zeitgeist. And Suzuki is based on this and confidently gives the middle class naked offspring the nickname “The Apex Predator”. A bold announcement! Whether it is also true?

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Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750

Driving report Suzuki GSX-S 750
Offspring in the middle class

Middle class bike completely renewed

You definitely want to distance yourself from its tame predecessor, the GSR 750. Not because it was bad or an absolute grandfather clock – after all, Suzuki Germany sold 993 units last year – but because it sometimes led a life as an underdog. As an all-round good mid-range four-cylinder bike, it drove neatly through botany, offered respectable manners and everyday qualities and was a real recommendation for beginners and advanced riders. But one thing was missing: the wow factor, the rough edges, the bite. Its successor, the Suzuki GSX-S 750, is now there to put this ideal world in a slanting position.

Video about the Suzuki GSX-S 750

Jagged lines and angular contours

In fact, the Suzuki GSX-S 750 squints equally cheekily and confidently from the new headlights, making it clear that Suzuki does not want to be satisfied with a market share of 5.7 percent in Germany (2016). It makes sense that you don’t have to reinvent the wheel right away: The Japanese stole the steel bridges for the GSX-S 750-
Frame and the 749 cubic four-cylinder from the predecessor. It leans with jagged lines and angular contours
outwardly now to the design of the big sister GSX-S 1000, manifesting not only the family affiliation, but also the sporty, almost aggressive character.

Tire developed in cooperation with Bridgestone

The new front spoiler elegantly and very nicely conceals the revised Euro 4-compliant exhaust system. Part of the newly designed petrol bunker, which now has a capacity of 16 instead of 17.5 liters, is covered by detailed side panels. The stylish ten-spoke cast aluminum rims peek out really cool behind the revised, now tapered swing arms and the new four-piston radial brake calipers. The rims are soled with Bridgestones Supersport tires S21 with the special code G. Anyone who expects this to be a cheap derivative of rubber is wrong. The tire was optimized for the Suzuki GSX-S 750 in cooperation with Bridgestone. The carcass as well as the shape and mix have been adjusted. Why? Well, because the 213 kilogram bike should fall neatly into the corner. Whether it did anything?

The rear wheel is monitored by a traction control

Swiftly swing your leg over the narrow bench and ask the hoarse singing four-cylinder to dance at a height of 820 millimeters. But instead of putting a fiery flamenco on the parquet with the four-cylinder, which has now increased by eight to 114 hp, the damp streets, which are partly muddy from the downpours of the previous days, call for a slow waltz. Help is assured for inexperienced or fearful pilots. The rear wheel of the Suzuki GSX-S 750 is monitored by a traction control and is braked very early on at the highest of the three levels to prevent it from breaking away.

Six-speed gearbox precise and fluffy

The clutch lever is pleasantly easy to operate, and first gear engages almost silently. Suzi pushes off carefully, the “Low-RPM-Assist” already built into the GSX-S 1000, a kind of starting aid that automatically raises the gas when the clutch is engaged, is discreetly noticeable. The bike seems to have good manners. The engine, which has been fitted with new injection nozzles and ventilation holes in the crankcase, responds smoothly and without delay to gas commands even at the lowest speeds, and the six-speed gearbox shifts precisely and smoothly. Despite (or maybe because of) its nickname, the Suzuki GSX-S 750 leaves its driver alone and creates plenty of space for perceiving the surroundings. Pleasing: The new addition has not inherited the tough load changes of the 1000s. Although load change reactions are also noticeable in the little sister, they are of no consequence. That increases the anticipation of what’s coming now. Because the sun is increasingly prevailing against the thick layer of clouds, the streets are drying up. Time to replace the waltz rocking pace with a cross-dynamic flamenco interlude.

Tank could have been a bit narrower

Down three gears and into the changing curve pool of the Spanish hinterland. You twirl the Suzuki GSX-S 750 lightly (also thanks to the rounder contour of the S21-G tires) into the corner, beautifully smooth and neutral over the entire lean angle, you direct your neck through the thicket of curves. Only in fast cornering you have to work hard on the butted handlebars to quickly shift the mass from left to right. You quickly notice that a smooth driving style without hard acceleration and slow braking suits the newcomer best. The optimized 41 millimeter upside-down fork from Kayaba and the shock absorber are perfectly coordinated. Both can only be adjusted in the spring base, but have sufficient reserves for the brisk journey without sacrificing comfort. This is complemented by the finely adjustable and powerful brakes, the low opening moment of the tires and the extremely chest of drawers, but by no means passive seating position. At a height of 1.78 meters, the knees bend casually, only the tank could have been a bit narrower to spread the legs a little less.

And the engine?

Here Suzuki dares to take a step that clearly sets it apart from the competition. Instead of giving the four-cylinder engine from the 2005 GSX-R 750 more punch at medium speeds, the Japanese have made the performance characteristics sharper in favor of a higher maximum output. Nothing below, everything above? Well, if you switch to attack, you should at least not let the speed drop below 6,000 revolutions. If you have the knife between your teeth, you should aim for 1,000 more tours. From here the quad turns wonderfully liberated, without noticeable performance kinks or nasty vibrations up to its maximum speed of 11,500 revolutions, sounds hoarse-screeching from the large rear silencer and warms the hearts of all four-cylinder freaks. What the bike lacks in pressure in the lower and middle speed range, it tries to make up for with the sound-optimized airbox. With a pithy, slurping suction noise, there is no lack of character in this area.

And how much does the new Suzuki GSX-S 750 cost?

Without question, the Suzuki GSX-S 750 has gotten a lot of rough edges. It is still suitable for (re) beginners and advanced users, is a successful evolution of its predecessor. The Suzuki will have to earn the nickname “Apex Predator” in comparison with the competition. The price is absolutely competitive. Anyone who signs the purchase contract by April 1, 2017, will receive the GSX-S 750 for 8,490 euros. If you access it later, you have to shell out 400 euros more. It is not yet known exactly when the motorcycle will be at the dealerships. No later than spring.

Changes compared to the Suzuki GSR 750

Euro 4 standard now fulfilled

Design language completely new, including new headlights, LED taillights and brake lights, front spoiler, etc..

Maximum output increased from 106 to 114 hp. These are now 500 revolutions later at 10,500 rpm

New 10-hole injection nozzles

Additional vents on the crankcase, which minimize pumping losses and enable higher maximum performance

Modified exhaust system with new muffler, catalytic converter taken over from GSX-S 1000

Traction control three-stage, can be switched off

Four piston calipers mounted radially

Airbox redesigned with a focus on sound optimization

“Easy Start System” After pressing the button, the starter turns automatically until the engine starts

LCD cockpit from the GSX-S 1000

Technical data Suzuki GSX-S 750

Suzuki GSX-S 750

engine

Water-cooled four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine, two overhead, chain-driven camshafts, four valves per cylinder, bucket tappets, wet sump lubrication, injection, 4 x Ø 32 mm, regulated catalytic converter, 400 W alternator,
Battery 12 V / 10 Ah, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, chain, secondary ratio 43:17.
Bore x stroke: 72.0 x 46.0 mm
Displacement: 749 cc
Compression ratio: 12.3: 1
Rated capacity: 84.0 kW (114 hp) at 10,500 rpm
Max. Torque: 81 Nm at 9,000 rpm

landing gear

Bridge frame made of steel, upside-down fork, Ø 41 mm, adjustable spring base, two-arm swing arm made of steel, central spring strut with lever system, adjustable spring base, double disc brake at the front, Ø 310 mm, four-piston fixed calipers, disc brake at the rear, Ø 240 mm, single-piston floating caliper, Traction control, ABS.
Cast aluminum wheels: 3.50 x 17; 5.50 x 17
Tires: 120/70 ZR 17; 180/55 ZR 17

Dimensions + weights

Wheelbase 1455 mm, steering head angle 64.7 degrees, caster 104 mm, spring travel f / r 120/138 mm, seat height 820 mm, empty weight 213 kg, permissible total weight 400 kg, tank capacity 16.0 liters.
Guarantee: two years
Colours: Blue, black, red
Price: 8,890 euros
Additional costs: 250 euro

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