Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
Müller

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800

24 photos

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800: The three-cylinder engine generates 95 hp at 9300 rpm from 799 cubic meters.

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC with accessories: exhaust from Arrow.

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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The off-road version of the Triumph Tiger 800 bears the suffix XC and, compared to the road version, has more suspension travel and a 21-inch wire-spoke front wheel.

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800: Triumph specifies 79 Newton meters at 7850 rpm as the maximum torque.

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC: What both models have in common is an optional ABS that can be switched off.

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph officially presented the new Tiger 800 travel enduro at the Eicma.

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC – seat height: 845 to 865 millimeters.

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 – seat height: 810 to 830 millimeters.

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800: With a tank capacity of 19 liters, nothing stands in the way of the big tour with the (basically not that small) new Tigers.

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800 XC

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph Tiger 800

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Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800
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Triumph unveiled the Tiger 800 travel enduro at Eicma in Milan.

Driving report: Triumph

The new Triumph Tiger 800 (with video)

The tiger has offspring, and one with claws and teeth. MOTORRAD was allowed to try out the Tiger 800 exclusively on a short test lap around the Hinckley plant.

You really mixed up the supersport scene with the razor-sharp Daytona 675. You caused quite a sensation with the all-rounders with the crisp Street Triple. And now the British are firing the next broadside. In the form of the Tiger 800, a mid-range enduro, the heart of which is the famous little three-cylinder from the two successful sister models.

The West Pocket Tiger will be available in two versions as Adventure Enduro, namely the street-oriented Tiger 800 with a 19-inch front wheel and the on- and off-road version with the addition of XC and 21-inch wheels at the front. Apart from the tires, the two models differ slightly in terms of equipment and chassis components.

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Driving report: Triumph Tiger 800

Driving report: Triumph
The new Triumph Tiger 800 (with video)


Manufacturer

The XC variant appeals to the adventurer with a 21-inch front wheel, protectors for the engine, handlebars and radiator.

But the Tiger driver hardly stays up there anyway, prefers to use the full center and the even thrust from the deepest regions. The three-cylinder hardly knows any vibrations, so it has a lot ahead of the competing Twins – especially the BMW – in any case.

In terms of chassis, he doesn’t have to hide from them either. Extremely light-footed, the tiger whizzes through the dense English left-hand traffic. The short test track did not contain any road construction challenges, but it did suggest stable, neutral driving behavior paired with clean, appealing suspension. In addition, there is an easily adjustable, powerful brake thanks to the stable double disc at the front.

The test machine did not yet have an ABS; Triumph naturally offers it as an option for both versions in series production. It can be switched off for tough off-road use. It goes without saying at Triumph that having fun with the kitten is assessed in a socially acceptable manner. The Tiger XC will be positioned below the BMW F 800 GS, the street tiger will be a little above the sparsely equipped and throttled F 650 GS. As an option, Triumph wants to offer a wide range of accessories right from the start to individually upgrade the basic machine, from the luggage system to the additional headlights.

But even in the standard trim you hardly miss anything. The multifunctional cockpit display provides information on consumption and range. Even a tire pressure display is already prepared, the customer only has to retrofit the sensors. After the first contact, one thing is certain: the little tiger can not only hiss viciously, but can also pull out sharp claws.

Technical specifications


Manufacturer

95 hp, 210 kilograms, plus decent equipment and fine components. The Tiger does not have to fear any opponent.

Engine:
Water-cooled three-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine, a balance shaft, two overhead, chain-driven camshafts, four valves per cylinder, bucket tappets, wet sump lubrication, injection, controlled catalytic converter, mechanically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, X-ring chain.
Bore x stroke 74.0 x 61.9 mm
Displacement 799 cc
rated capacity 70.0 kW (95 PS) at 9300 rpm
Max. Torque 79 Nm at 7850 rpm

Landing gear:
Trellis frame made of steel, upside-down fork, Ø 43 (45) mm, two-arm swing arm made of aluminum, central spring strut with lever system, adjustable spring base (adjustable spring base and rebound damping), double disc brake at the front, Ø 308 mm, double-piston floating calipers, disc brake at the rear, Ø 255 mm, single-piston floating caliper, ABS.
Cast aluminum wheels 2.50 x 19 (2.50 x 21); 4.25 x 17
Tires 110/80 ZR 19 (90/90 ZR 21); 150/70 ZR 17

Mass and weight:
Wheelbase 1555 (1568) mm, steering head angle 66.3 (66.9) degrees, caster 86 (91) mm, spring travel f / r 180/170 (220/215) mm, seat height 810-830 (845-865) mm, Weight with a full tank 210 (215) kg, tank capacity 19 liters.
guarantee two years
price k. A..

Interview with the product manager


triumph

Simon Warburton, Triumph UK’s Product Manager.

? If you look at the Tiger 800 today, it turned out as it was planned in 2007?

! Definitely! We are satisfied that we did not have any serious problems during development, so we did not have to make any major changes to the concept.

? The 675 is a fantastic engine. Why did the little three-cylinder have to get bigger?

! As a sports engine, the 675 is really fantastic. But for an adventure enduro you need a completely different character. The engine should not only offer more torque, but above all act as civilized and controlled as possible in order to get a smooth, supple driving behavior. In addition, the BMW F 800 GS became apparent early on, so we didn’t want to allow ourselves a competitive disadvantage.

? More than 90 percent new parts in the engine are expensive, that was necessary?

! When we decided on a longer stroke, it was inevitable. Anything else would have been half-hearted. Because the 675 is so compact, we needed a new crankcase, for example. It was a tough decision. But if we hadn’t done that, the result wouldn’t be as good as it is today.

? Why are there two models?

! The Tiger 800 is a bike for everything, whether it’s a weekend trip, daily use, long distances. The low seat height increases the number of potential buyers. The Tiger 800 XC is the adventure bike for people looking for new challenges.

? So far, Triumph doesn’t necessarily mean off-road experience. It was a challenge to develop an off-road enduro?

! It was certainly a learning process. Although we have accumulated a great deal of know-how over 20 years, we had to add new test procedures and development processes. Fortunately, we already had testers and technicians with an affinity for off-roading.

? Was the cost decisive for the steel frame?

! Cost is always a factor. The decisive factor was the resilience, and defects are easier to repair on the go.

? What are the target markets for the Tiger 800?

! Italy, France, the UK, Germany, and the US, in that order. The other markets are considerably smaller.

? How many units are you aiming for in 2011??

! We are aiming for around 7500 units worldwide in the 2011 financial year, around 1000 of them in Germany.

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