Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
markus-jahn.com

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test

11 photos

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
fact / Joachim Schahl

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Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
markus-jahn.com

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Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
fact / Joachim Schahl

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The platform for TC & Co. is sitting in the front of the pulpit.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
fact / Joachim Schahl

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Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
fact / Joachim Schahl

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Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
fact / Joachim Schahl

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The one-off got extensive electronics at the highest level from the tuner. The Magneti Marelli electronics allow the driver a number of options that can be activated and varied at the push of a button.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
fact / Joachim Schahl

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The programmable racing dashboard shows the pilot everything worth knowing.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
markus-jahn.com

8/11
Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
fact / Joachim Schahl

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Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
fact / Joachim Schahl

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Instead of the series system roaring from the hump, Hertrampf installed a Termignoni system for better performance.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test

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The V4 looks pretty tough around the bottom, even if the test bench shows it to be more jagged than a series Desmo. The tuning measures took effect around the top.

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test

MotoGP replica at TunerGP

Content of

In 2008, Ducati launched the Desmosedici RR, a superb Grand Prix replica. Tuner Denis Hertrampf turned one of the 1500 available rarities into a truly unique piece. And PS she drove:

D.he sound of the Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR makes people flock to the paddock at the Hockenheimring. Pure V4 hammering at an impressive volume. A really nice moment – as a test driver you feel particularly privileged, because of this extremely expensive motorcycle (61,500 euros when it was launched in 2008) there are only 1,500 pieces in the world – some of which are said to have crashed into various gravel beds around the world.

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Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test

Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR Stoner in the test
MotoGP replica at TunerGP

Hertrampf made a big splash on the MotoGP replica. Isn’t he in awe of the good piece? “Why, you can always improve something,” said the motorsport-experienced tuner from Nordhorn, delighted with this customer order. “Actually, the original Desmo drives really horribly,” explains Hertrampf. But we have agreed to drive first and then talk shop.

V4 higher compressed than that "Series engine"

So out of the box, into the ring. The emotions that the 90-degree V4 engine generates in the pilot are immediate. It runs quite rough, but in the heart and mind of the pilot it floods pure joy. The start out on the GP circuit in Hockenheim is not so unearthly. Every BMW S 1000 RR pulls your arms out more decisively when you accelerate. The Desmo drive looks sluggish downstairs like a St. Bernard in the midday sun. But in the vicinity of the five-digit speed range and then with every tiny turn of the retrofitted short-stroke throttle grip, things get down to business. Hui, how the thing suddenly goes off and knows no mercy until something over 13,000 / min.

But Denis Hertrampf had to deal with the four-cylinder. The heads were processed, the channels on the flow bench optimized. The tuner also redesigned the timing of the camshafts driven by gears. The V4 is also more highly compressed than the “production engine”, if you can even call it that.

Add to that the cries of war from the airbox and the Termignoni MotoGP racing system installed by Hertrampf – you can’t imagine how the V4 would otherwise work. Probably more suitable for everyday use, but especially in the racing-relevant speed range above 10,000 rpm, not quite as brisk and revving.

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Every turn demands determination and dedication

Anyone who leaves the motorcycle cold has never got beyond the moped status in their life or suffers from emotional hypothermia. Always kept within the appropriate speed range, the Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR lifts the front wheel with every step in the automatic gearshift. You don’t need a pick at the stub, but a pilot who puts all his weight on the front wheel. No doubt about it, a touch of MotoGP creeps through your body.

And that means hard work in the first place. Which doesn’t really have to do with the V4, but rather with the chassis of the Desmosedici. Incredible that the geometry of this red burner comes straight from the 2006 GP bike. The sitting position with the low handlebars and the upper body stretched far forward feels incredibly old-fashioned. The motorcycle is huge and accordingly bulky. Every corner demands determination and enthusiasm from the pilot, otherwise it will completely ruin the line – the brilliantly made and top-quality chassis from Hertrampf cannot compensate for that.

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Great and typical: the cornering stability

Great and typically Ducati, however, is the cornering stability. If the radii are large, you have the feeling of being able to write an SMS at the same time, the Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR follows the chosen line in an inclined position. It is also brake-stable, no matter how determined you press into the Brembo monoblocks. One is more likely to fear for one’s own muscle strength in the arms and in the thighs, which are pressed tightly against the huge fuel drum, than that the red Zora would take off at the back. Round after round there is still room for improvement. Also a credit to the engine brake control as part of the Magneti Marelli electronics installed by the tuner and directly from the World Cup. With the gyroscopes and other sensors, it provides a traction control that exudes sovereignty and gives the pilot the appropriate feeling of security to fire the sinfully expensive one-off after the narrower corners with high speeds and a certain recklessness.

When I bring the diva back through the pit lane after waving off the turn, a neat little group is curiously waiting, everyone wants to know how it was. Exciting, no question about it! But to be honest: A battle-ready, cleanly built R6 or the superbikes that stand around for the TunerGP are more impressive overall. They make it a lot easier to be fast. The Desmosedici, on the other hand, means real work. Denis minimized this very successfully, but in the end you can’t change anything about the vehicle concept itself.

Technical data Hertrampf-Ducati

Power on the crankshaft, measurements on Dynojet roller dynamometer 250.

The V4 of the Hertrampf-Ducati Desmosedici D16RR looks pretty tough around the bottom, even if the test bench shows it to be more jagged than a series Desmo. The tuning measures took effect around the top.

Weight: 183.0 kg
front / back: 53.5 / 46.5%
Power: 187 hp
Conversion costs: 130,000 euros

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