Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

25th photos

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
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1/25
Honda CB 1100 and CB 750. The tradition of the classic, air-cooled four-cylinder from Japan is continued.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

2/25
The oil tank for the dry sump lubrication is hidden behind the side cover. In the background: carburetor and kick starter.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

3/25
Flat plastic and factual lettering.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

4/25
Foursome, greet me from the sun! Both can do that equally.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

5/25
New: Offers more information, but undoubtedly has less style

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

6/25
Old: two instruments, two rows of numbers rolled up, two pointers, four little lights for control. Basta.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

7/25
I am, so I drive. Being is timeless on both.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

8/25
Strong and almost indestructible: its appearance resembled a UFO and the layout of the air-cooled in-line four-wheeler shaped Japanese motorcycle construction for decades.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

9/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

10/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

11/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

12/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

13/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

14/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

15/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

16/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

17/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

18/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

19/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

20/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

21/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

22/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

23/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

24/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
Gargolov

25/25
Exit with Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100.

Impression Honda CB 750, Honda CB 1100

The
Big Bang

When the Honda CB 750 was presented at the Tokyo Motor Show in 1968, the modern era of motorcycle construction began. The new CB 1100 continues the tradition of the classic, air-cooled four-cylinder from Japan. 45 years lie between the two machines, traces of earlier genes can still be found?

UTo understand why the Honda CB 750 hit the proverbial bomb, one has to look at the environment into which the world’s first large-scale four-cylinder was born. At the end of the 1960s, the economic miracle had long since reached the little man, and so he preferred to drive to work in his own car rather than on a weather-dependent two-wheeler. The image of motorcyclists was somewhere between “poor dog” and “unfortunate mess”. The manufacturer‘s range of models looked accordingly.

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Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Impression Honda CB 750, Honda CB 1100
The
Big Bang

Honda CB 1100 with updated technology

Lots of 125 cc dominated the scene, 250 cc with an output of around 25 hp were already considered seasoned motorcycles, and the top league was made up of priceless exotic vehicles such as MV Agusta or Münch. One step below that, the BMW R 75/5 with British twins like a BSA Thunderbolt or Triumph Bonneville and Italian divas such as Moto Guzzi V7 Spezial, Laverda 750 S and Ducati 750 GT competed for rare customers. Around 50 hp was definitely a lot of wood for the Twins of that time. And now the Honda: four cylinders, overhead camshaft, 67 hp, 200 km / h! Plus the first standard disc brake – and at an affordable price. The madness!

The first tests by the enthusiastic specialist press quickly refuted fears that this rocket was undrivable. It also quickly became apparent that the mighty four-cylinder was not only strong, but also raised the bar significantly in terms of reliability. From then on, Honda was virtually overwhelmed by demand and the concept of the transversely installed air-cooled four-cylinder engine shaped the layout of Japanese motorcycles for decades.

Til today. However, a current Fireblade not only looks a little different, technically, apart from the in-line engine principle, it no longer has much to do with the parent mother. But Honda has reconsidered its classic and launched the CB 1100 on the domestic market in 2010. A retro bike with a classic look with updated technology. A joint excursion is almost an obvious choice.

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Naked bike


Driving report Honda CB 1100


Traditional optics meet modern technology


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Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Modern Classic


Comparison test: Harley-Davidson Sportster Forty-Eight, Honda CB 1100, Kawasaki W 800, Moto Guzzi V7 Racer, Triumph Scrambler


The slow must go on


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Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

classic


Honda CB 1100 R and Honda VF 1000 R in comparison test


The series offshoot of the long-distance racer


read more

How much is left of the Honda CB 750??

A serious comparison of the two is of course forbidden, because it would give the Honda engineers a bad report if, after a good four decades of progress, the 911 CB did not mercilessly doze the seven and a half on all fronts. At all? Well we’ll see. Rather, the question arises of how much spirit and character is left of the ancients today.


Gargolov

I am, so I drive. Being is timeless on both.

On closer inspection, including the tapping test, the CB 750 reveals itself to be honest skin: what looks like chrome or sheet metal or rubber is chrome or sheet metal or rubber. In the 1100s, a number of small parts are made of plain plastic. After all, the fenders are made of chrome-plated steel.

There are also big differences in the seat test: On the old one, the height difference between the saddle and handlebars is significantly lower than on the new one, which, in conjunction with the footrests that are far forward and below, results in an unusual, albeit not uncomfortable position. On the new one, the handlebars are much higher and pulled back, the pegs are quite high up and back, which leads to rather tight angles in the bones of long-legged people.

Time to get things moving! Unsurprisingly, the 911 always starts at the push of a button and goes into a stable idle state. Depending on the temperature, the seven-five offers a significantly higher level of experience: open the fuel tap, the choke lever up and then, -wiieewiieewiiee, the starter wails, and the four cylinders report to work one after the other, wrapping the scene in a bassy, ​​babbling sound Idle sound carpet as well as an odeur of the burnt mixture. Or the unburned one. Let’s get away.

After a few kilometers, the horse and rider got used to each other and reached operating temperature. The 40-year-old foursome goes to work in a cultivated manner. It hardly vibrates and pulls evenly and powerfully through the rev range. The nominal power is applied at 8000 revolutions. After all, 67 hp, which means a specific output of almost 90 hp / liter. The new four-cylinder looks old with “only” 79 hp / liter despite the double cam head.

Honda CB 1100 consumes only half as much

The current emission limit values ​​are tightening his throat; in the past people hardly cared about exhaust gases and noise. But here and now it’s not about the last bit of top performance, instead we mostly romp around in the range between 3000 and 6000 tours, enjoy the view and listen to the beguiling sound that escapes from the four flutes of the 750s. Basically, the drive is quite contemporary, apart from the immense thirst. Even taking into account the consumption-promoting photo trips, ten liters per 100 kilometers of a good thing is still too much. The new one gets by with around half under the same conditions.


Gargolov

Honda CB 1100 and CB 750. The tradition of the classic, air-cooled four-cylinder from Japan is continued.

In terms of character, the new four-series has not strayed too far from the old one: Cozy grumbling downstairs, of course more powerful in the middle of the engine speed due to the displacement advantage, but quite tough at the top. The big foursome is a great companion for the de-stressed ride. He refuses to think about performance so consistently that it is sealed off at 180 km / h. On the German autobahn, the old could outrun the new. Theoretically.

In the reality of the little provincial road in southern France, switching from old to new almost feels like switching from a forty-tonne truck to a kart. The 1100 is easy and nimble to control, thanks to its narrow tires, it drives around all corners in a nice and neutral way and thanks to the combination brake and ABS it can be operated with one Brake fingers together. And this is where the real progress lies: If you were to choose the braking point of the 911 only once on the five-five, the journey would inevitably end next to the road. So anticipatory driving is indicated if you want to arrive safely.

The oldie chassis itself isn’t that bad. Assuming a proper driving style, the fork and struts manage to keep the worst hardship away from the driver, although today’s standards of response, feedback and damping force are better not to apply. The new one is inconspicuous in the best sense of the word. And at the end of a wonderful day of motorcycling, you begin to suspect what a blast the CB must have been back then. A big bang!

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test
28 photos

Images: Impression Honda CB 750, Honda CB 1100

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Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

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Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

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Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

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Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Honda CB 750 and Honda CB 1100 in the test

Manufacturer

Technical specifications


Gargolov

Foursome, greet me from the sun! Both can do that equally.

Honda CB 750 (1972) Honda CB 1100
Type of engine air-cooled four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine,
two valves per cylinder, through an overhead
Camshaft and rocker arm operated,
E and kick starter 
air-cooled four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine,
four valves per cylinder, through two overhead
Camshafts and bucket tappets actuated,
Electric starter
Mixture preparation Quadruple carburetor, Ø 28 mm Injection, Ø 32 mm
coupling Multi-disc oil bath clutch Multi-disc oil bath clutch
transmission Five-speed Five-speed
Secondary drive O-ring chain O-ring chain
Bore x stroke 61.0 x 63.0 mm 73.5 x 67.2 mm
Displacement 736 cc 1140 cc
compression 9.0: 1 9.5: 1
power 49 kW (67 PS) at 8000 rpm 66 kW (90 PS) at 7500 rpm
Torque 60 Nm at 7000 rpm 93 Nm at 5000 rpm
Weight with a full tank 235 kilograms 248 kg
Top speed over 200 km / h 180 km / h
price 6598 marks 7595 euros

To understand why the Honda CB 750 hit the proverbial bomb, one has to look at the environment into which the world’s first large-scale four-cylinder was born. At the end of the 1960s, the economic miracle had long since reached the little man, and so he preferred to drive his own car rather than the weather-
dependent two-wheeler to work. The image of motorcyclists was somewhere in between "poor dog" and "unfortunate baffle". The manufacturer’s range of models looked accordingly.
Lots of 125 cc dominated the scene, 250 cc with outputs of around 25 hp were already regarded as seasoned motorcycles, and the top league was made up of priceless exotic vehicles such as MV Agusta or Münch.
One step below was the BMW R 75/5 with British twins like a BSA Thunderbolt or Triumph Bonneville and
Italian divas like Moto Guzzi V7 Spezial, Laverda 750 S and Ducati 750 GT for the rare clientele.
Around 50 hp was definitely a lot of wood for the Twins of that time. And now the Honda: four cylinders, overhead camshaft, 67 hp, 200 km / h! Plus the first standard disc brake – and at an affordable price. The madness!
The first tests by the enthusiastic specialist press quickly refuted fears that this rocket was undrivable. It also quickly emerged that the mighty four-cylinder was not
was only strong, but also raised the bar significantly in terms of reliability. From then on, Honda was virtually overwhelmed by demand and the concept of the transversely installed air-cooled four-cylinder engine shaped the layout for decades
Japanese motorcycles.
Til today. However, a current Fireblade not only looks a little different, technically, apart from the in-line engine principle, it no longer has much to do with the parent mother. But Honda has reconsidered its classic and launched the CB 1100 on the domestic market in 2010. A retro bike with a classic look with updated technology. A joint excursion is almost an obvious choice.
A serious comparison of the two is of course forbidden, because it would give the Honda engineers a bad report if, after a good four decades of progress, the 911 CB did not mercilessly doze the seven and a half on all fronts. At all? Well we’ll see. Rather, the question arises of how much spirit and character is left of the ancients today.
On closer inspection, including the tapping test, the CB 750 reveals itself to be honest skin: what looks like chrome or sheet metal or rubber is chrome or sheet metal or rubber. In the 1100s, a number of small parts are made of plain plastic. After all, the fenders are made of chrome-plated steel.
There are also big differences in the seat test: On the old one, the height difference between the saddle and handlebars is significantly lower than on the new one, which, in conjunction with the footrests that are far forward and below, results in an unusual, albeit not uncomfortable position. On the new one, the handlebars are much higher and pulled back, the pegs are quite high up and back, which leads to rather tight angles in the bones of long-legged people.
Time to get things moving! Unsurprisingly, the 911 always starts at the push of a button and goes into a stable idle state. Depending on the temperature, the seven-fiver offers a significantly higher level of experience: the fuel tap open, the choke lever up and then, howiieewiiee, the starter wails, and sparkling and
The four cylinders report to work one after the other and wrap the scene in a bassy, ​​babbling idle soundscape as well as in an odor of the burnt
Mixture. Or the unburned one. Let’s get away.
After a few kilometers, the horse and rider got used to each other and reached operating temperature. The 40-year-old foursome goes to work in a cultivated manner. It hardly vibrates and pulls evenly and powerfully through the rev range. The nominal power is applied at 8000 revolutions. After all, 67 hp, which means a specific output of almost 90 hp / liter. Then the new four sees-
cylinder with "just" 79 HP / liter looks old despite the double cam head.
The current emission limits are tightening his throat,
In the past, people hardly cared about exhaust fumes and noise.
But here and now it’s not about the last bit of top performance, instead we mostly romp around in the range between 3000 and 6000 tours, enjoy the view and
listen to the beguiling sound of the four flutes of the 750s
escapes. Basically, the drive is quite contemporary,
apart from the immense thirst. Even taking into account the consumption-boosting photo trips, ten liters per 100
Kilometers of good then too much. The new one gets by with around half under the same conditions.
In terms of character, the new four-series has not strayed too far from the old one: Cozy grumbling downstairs, of course more powerful in the middle of the engine speed due to the displacement advantage, but quite tough at the top. The big foursome is a great companion for the de-stressed ride. He refuses to think about performance so consistently that it is sealed off at 180 km / h. On the German autobahn, the old could outrun the new. Theoretically.
In the reality of the little provincial road in southern France, switching from old to new almost feels like switching from a forty-tonne truck to a kart. The 1100 is easy and nimble to control, thanks to its narrow tires, it drives around all corners in a nice and neutral way and thanks to the combination brake and ABS it can be operated with one Brake fingers together. And this is where the real progress lies: If you were to choose the braking point of the 911 only once on the five-five, the journey would inevitably end next to the road. So anticipatory driving is indicated if you want to arrive safely. The oldie chassis itself isn’t that bad. Assuming a proper driving style, the fork and struts manage to keep the worst hardship away from the driver, although today’s standards of response, feedback and damping force are better not to apply. The new one is inconspicuous in the best sense of the word. And at the end of a wonderful day of motorcycling, you begin to suspect what a blast the CB must have been back then. A big bang!
www.motorradonline.de/honda

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