Honda NC 750 S in the individual test

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
Jahn

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test

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Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
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The Honda NC 750 S weighs 220 kilograms with a full tank.

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
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Honda NC 750 S in the individual test.

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
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More service: The displays for gear as well as current and average consumption are new.

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
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Rowed back: Instead of the CBS system, a conventional braking system with ABS is now used.

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
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The Honda NC 750 S lacks the CBS composite brake system of its predecessor.

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
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On a comparison drive with the 700, the Honda NC 750 S only consumed 0.2 liters more.

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
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Compared to its predecessor, Honda has given the 750 a slightly more flywheel mass and lengthened the secondary transmission.

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
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The new price of the Honda NC 750 S is 5990 euros.

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
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Performance diagram Honda NC 750 S.

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test

More displacement, more power

Bigger is fancier. The saying may not apply to all things by far. In terms of displacement, however, it is often correct. As in the case of the Honda NC 750 S..

Just ask a Harley driver what he thinks about displacement. You know the answer: You can’t replace displacement with anything other than more displacement! From now on, Honda has also given its bestselling NC series models an additional 75 cm³. This number may be misleading with regard to the cubic capacity in the model name, but the previously available NC 700 had only 670 cc. The new Honda NThe C 750 S now has 745 cm³. The increase in displacement was achieved with a four millimeter larger bore. And before we get into the saddle and see whether these four millimeters are ultimately big cinema, we send the NC 750 S to the MOTORCYCLE test bench.

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Honda NC 750 S in the individual test

Honda NC 750 S in the individual test
More displacement, more power

From zero to 100 in five seconds

Already in the basic construction of the 700 series, bearings and moving parts were designed for increased displacement and increased performance. The second balancer shaft was always planned, the space was available. So much for theory. What does the effort bring in practice? In order to work with reliable values ​​instead of just using the popometer, the test driver must determine tangible data. It accelerates the Honda NC 750 S from zero to 100 km / h in five seconds and to 140 km / h in 10.4 seconds. A clear improvement over its little sister can be seen here: the 700 needs 5.6 seconds to sprint to 100 km / h, and even 12.0 seconds pass at 140 km / h. But after all, life is not a drag strip, much more important is the question of how the increase in displacement affects pulling power. In order to be able to compare engines directly, MOTORRAD determines the torque values ​​in the last gear.

Of course, in everyday life you will downshift before overtaking, that is practical. When comparing the pulling power of the two NC models, both are almost wheel to wheel. It’s about the famous Muggaseggele (mosquito sack = smallest Swabian unit of measurement): When accelerating in sixth gear from 60 to 100 km / h, the Honda NC 750 S only takes the little sister 0.2 seconds. From 100 to 140 km / n it is also only 0.2 seconds. When driving in direct comparison, the larger engine always looks more powerful. Its pulsation is stronger, the beat more powerful, its beat more potent. You can almost feel the thicker pistons and the increased displacement. The 750 feels much more mature. Unfortunately, a Muggaseggele is also more phlegmatic than his little colleague. This may be due to the second balance shaft, which has to be accelerated. In addition, the 750 cc has been given a little more flywheel mass and the secondary transmission has been lengthened: Instead of a 16-tooth sprocket, a 17-tooth sprocket now pulls on the chain.

With a full tank, the Honda NC 750 S weighs a total of 220 kilograms

All of these changes mean that the 700 appears slightly more easy-to-turn and more liberated when switching. Nevertheless, the 750 has the better start. In direct comparison with the 700 series, overtaking maneuvers are more relaxed, the 750 series twin converts the power more directly, the much-vaunted overtaking from the wrist is more likely to apply to it. All the changes in the engine made it two kilograms heavier. Overall, the Honda NC 750 S weighs 220 kilograms with a full tank, five kilograms more than the 700.

In terms of handling, which was foolproof but always quite sluggish, this hardly has a negative impact. What else do you notice? The Honda NC 750 S requires a little more manual force when coupling. The cockpit now also offers a gear indicator and additional information such as the current and average fuel consumption. Incidentally, it has increased slightly. On a quick comparison run with the 700, the bigger sister consumed 3.4 liters per 100 kilometers, just 0.2 liters more.

The new one lacks the CBS composite braking system

One important change concerns the brakes. While the predecessor was still equipped with a CBS composite brake system, which braked at the front when the foot brake pedal was pressed, the Honda NC 750 S fell victim to the red pencil. Honda explains the change and step backwards to two split brake circuits in response to the results of a worldwide customer survey: Most drivers only brake at the front. Anyway, instead of the three-piston caliper used in the 700 series, only a two-piston caliper is used.

But there is nothing to be criticized for. Compared to the 700, the front brake of a Muggaseggele (here we have it again!) Has a duller effect and requires a slightly higher actuation force. The delay effect is equal to that in the previous system. There is no doubt that when open, the 750 is superior to the smaller drive in many areas. Most customers shouldn’t care. Because Honda’s NC 700 models also became bestsellers due to their A2 driving license-friendly 48 hp. MOTORRAD will test how the throttled version of the Honda NC 750 S drives in one of the next issues.

Technical data Honda NC 750 S


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Performance diagram Honda NC 750 S.

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