Honda six-cylinder retro model

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Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

Honda six-cylinder retro model

Honda six-cylinder retro model

Honda six-cylinder retro model

Honda six-cylinder retro model

10 photos

Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

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Is Honda really bringing back the straight six-cylinder in the style of the legendary CBX? Patent images of a corresponding retro model that have now appeared suggest this.

Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

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Images that have now emerged from a patent application by Honda clearly show – the Japanese are again dealing with an in-line six-cylinder.

Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

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The six-cylinder is clearly based on liquid cooling, even if the hoses have been cleverly hidden.

Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

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The design is based on the RC166 racing machine from the 60s.

Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

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Because the design even includes indicators, reflectors, mirrors and a license plate holder, we assume that it is not a study, but an upcoming series model.

Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

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The six-cylinder is very narrow.

Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

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Spectacular rear view with the six megaphones.

Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

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In front of the elongated tank there is a small frame-mounted half-shell, the mono seat ends in a bold hump.

Honda six-cylinder retro model
Honda

9/10
A premiere at EICMA or Intermot this fall would be conceivable.

Honda six-cylinder retro model
archive

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Honda CBX
Four years after the Benelli six-cylinder, Honda finally rolled out a straight-six. With its 105 PS, the CBX was the first production bike in the world to break the 100 PS barrier. From 1978, 1047 cm³, 105 hp, 220 km / h.

Honda Patent Office Pictures

New six-cylinder as a retro model

Is Honda really bringing back the straight six-cylinder in the style of the legendary CBX? Patent images of a corresponding retro model that have now appeared suggest this. Here is all information about the new six.

1In 978, Honda presented the CBX, its first production model with an in-line six-cylinder engine – a model and an engine that made history. Now history seems to repeat itself.

Six cylinder with water cooling


Honda

Water cooling and six megaphones.

Images that have now emerged from a patent application by Honda clearly show: the Japanese are again dealing with an in-line six-cylinder. It relies on liquid cooling and two overhead camshafts. Honda knows how to hide the cooling hoses cleverly. A system for variable timing can also be interpreted in the design.

For a narrow overall width, the alternator-starter combination sits piggyback on the gearbox. The rear wheel is driven by a conventional chain. Since the pictures show a clutch lever as well as a classic transmission control via linkage, the DCT dual clutch transmission doesn’t seem to make a stab here.

There is of course no data on the engine, but there is speculation about at least 1,000 cm³, a high-speed concept and an output of somewhere between 170 and 200 hp.

Classic retro design


Honda

The design is based on the RC166 racing machine from the 60s.

The in-line six-cylinder is embedded in a steel tubular bridge frame. The elbows on both sides lead into three magnificent megaphones. There is an upside-down fork in the triple clamps, and the rear swing arm is supported by a central spring strut. At the front, radially hinged four-piston pliers slow down. The wheels are made of cast rims with filigree spokes.

In front of the elongated tank there is a small frame-mounted half-shell, the mono seat ends in a bold hump. Passenger footpegs clearly indicate a removable hump. In the front, LED lights seem to spread out, and small winglets are indicated on the radiator cowling. And because the design even includes indicators, reflectors, mirrors and a license plate holder, we assume that it is not a study, but an upcoming series model.

A premiere at EICMA or INTERMOT this autumn would be conceivable.

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