Test and technology: individual test BMW F 800 GT

Test and technology: individual test BMW F 800 GT
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Single test: BMW F 800 GT

The new sports tourer from BMW in the test

Freedom on two wheels, which also means having the choice between traveling and lawn. The new BMW F 800 GT wants to combine both – just like a real sports tourer.


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Feel Free – on the new F 800 GT you have the choice between traveling and racing.

Such a sports tourer is a fine story. Simply put the bag and pack on the moped, let the great love sit on the pillion seat – and off you go to Austria, Italy or over to the French. Do you want to get there quickly? No problem, there are motorways for that, and if you want to be a real touring athlete, you also have to master this discipline. A few hours of full-throttle distillery, and with a Mediterranean climate at best, you have arrived relaxed in front of your holiday accommodation for the next few days. The opportunity is good: the luggage is quickly unloaded, the Holden is given a big kiss and the first pass is swiftly burned up before sunset, so that the tires whimper. Hah! Those were the days when a Honda VFR 750 F was the measure of all things in the mid-range sports touring segment in the 1990s. And today?

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Test and technology: individual test BMW F 800 GT

Single test: BMW F 800 GT
The new sports tourer from BMW in the test

In this model year, the F 800 ST received a new surname and from then on ended with GT, which is known to stand for “Gran Tourismo”. Browsing through the pages of press material seems to support the assumption. The F 800 GT is said to have become more suitable for touring, and to look more adult and a bit more modern. Optionally, the BMW can now also be equipped with traction control and the electronic chassis adjustment ESA (only for the rebound damping of the shock absorber). A new ABS ensures safe delays and – so much we can reveal – shorter control intervals as standard. As far as the engine is concerned, two pistons, lined up next to each other, continue to run in parallel through their cylinder banks, developing a full 90 hp at their peak and thus a nominal five horsepower more than in the ST. The test machine even pressed a whopping 94 hp at 8400 revolutions on the test bench. Mainly responsible for this is the exhaust system known from the naked sister (F 800 R), which is supposed to bring out the combustion noises a little more groovy.

As the GT stands in front of you, with its single-sided swing arm that is now 50 millimeters longer and the unobstructed view of the redesigned rear wheel rim, your head intuitively begins to nod. That looks really great. In this context, a colleague even dares to make a visual comparison with the RC 30 – of course, only if one ignores the secondary drive. Because this continues to be carried out by a powerful belt, which by the way is the only one remaining in the entire BMW model range. You can like it or not, it is definitely easier to maintain and clean.

Enough looked, nodded and discussed, now we sit down. If one expects the ergonomics of a touring steamer after reading the press kit, part of the fear of the committed sports tourist immediately fizzles out when sitting up. The knee angle is still clearly designed for fast and dynamic driving, even if the notches have moved one centimeter forwards and downwards compared to the previous model. The seat height has been reduced by four to 80 centimeters thanks to a shorter fork, but can be individually adjusted if necessary by choosing the seat (sometimes subject to a surcharge).

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The knee angle of the F 800 GT is still clearly designed for fast and dynamic driving.

This is followed by the first grip on the vibration-isolated handlebar. Immediately it is noticeable that the turn signal is now operated using a common, albeit clumsy, combination switch. Otherwise, the handlebar, which is now higher up, lies comfortably in the hands. At the ends it is even cranked a little towards the driver, which gives it a sporty note. The touring athlete can only convince that the new one for a Gran Tourismo has become just a little less sporty in ergonomic terms.

Finally the right thumb can press the crucial button. The twin is immediately involved, and even in the latest set-up it sounds like a boxer engine. The adjustable clutch lever can be pulled with a little force, and first gear engages with little noise and precisely. As soon as the vehicle starts up, the muffler emits a pithy sound in which indefinable combustion noises are mixed up to around 3000 revolutions. From this speed onwards, the engine pushes the 213 kilogram heavy BMW forward energetically and with a measured 88 Newton meters, in order to continuously increase its power with increasing revs up to the limiter. The nice thing about it: Thanks to the steady engine characteristics, the driver is never overwhelmed, but can always call up enough power to rob the highway. The imposing rumble from the exhaust from 6000 revs is also character-forming.

The road is finally drying up and you can pull the cable hard. While the Metzeler Z8 harmonized perfectly with the GT in the wet, it now leaves a super neutral impression. No unexpected tilting into the curve, no set-up moment, full feedback even on a steep incline. That’s how it should be! A good choice.

Is there nothing to criticize about the BMW? Yes, even if, to the frustration of the notorious BMW haters, it is largely a matter of minor details. The transmission, which has just been praised, actually shifts exactly, but needs to be operated with a little emphasis on the gear lever, otherwise the frictional connection is lost somewhere between the gear pairs. And despite plenty of torque, a lot of gear changes have to be made in very winding terrain – with a theoretical maximum speed of around 230 km / h, the gear ratio is very long – and load changes are also clearly noticeable. As with its predecessor, the standard steering damper is also annoying with a too tight set-up, which means that a slow straight-ahead drive can sometimes become an egg dance. Otherwise there is nothing to complain about on the chassis side. The telescopic fork is more comfortable at the front, the shock absorber (on the test machine) is dampened “normal”, “comfortable” or “sporty” depending on the ESA setting. The handiness of the GT is okay, but not outstanding. It looks a bit stiff around the hips, especially in alternating curves. In return, the BMW is always sturdy on the asphalt and cannot be disturbed by potholes or cross joints.

What is noticeable: When driving courageously, the GT feels much better, then the active posture is more in line with the driving style. It remains to be noted that the new, somewhat wider cladding and the higher windshield do a great job in terms of wind and weather protection, and the increase in the payload by eleven to 207 kilograms does not seem to displease anyone looking at the scales shortly after Christmas . Ultimately, the F 800 GT is a really good sports tourer, which has been properly optimized in terms of long-distance comfort and suitability for travel without distorting the basic character of the ST. With a clear conscience, the sporty touring rider can rely on the new BMW, which, with its 15-liter tank and the presumably almost unchanged low fuel consumption, is the very last to stand in the way of a new tour to the south with subsequent cornering. So it can be packed again.

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Technical specifications


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The LCD display is now in one piece. The board computer has extensive information ready.

engine
Water-cooled two-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine, two overhead, chain-driven camshafts, four valves per cylinder, bucket tappets, dry sump lubrication, injection, Ø 46 mm, regulated catalytic converter, 400 W alternator, 12 V / 12 Ah battery, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, Toothed belt, secondary transmission 2.353.
Bore x stroke 82.0 x 75.6 mm
Displacement 798 cc
Compression ratio 12.0: 1
Rated output 66.0 kW (90 PS) at 8000 rpm
Max. Torque 86 Nm at 5800 rpm

landing gear
Bridge frame made of aluminum, telescopic fork, Ø 43 mm, steering damper, single-sided swing arm made of aluminum, central spring strut, directly hinged, adjustable spring base and rebound damping, double disc brake at the front, Ø 320 mm, four-piston fixed calipers, disc brake at the rear, Ø 265 mm, two-piston fixed caliper, ABS, Traction control.

Cast aluminum wheels 3.50 x 17; 5.50 x 17
Tires 120/70 ZR 17; 180/55 ZR 17

Dimensions + weight

Wheelbase 1514 mm, steering head angle 63.8 degrees, caster 95 mm, spring travel f / h 125/125 mm, curb weight ready to drive 213 kg, tank capacity 15.0 liters.
Two year guarantee
Colors orange, black, white
Price 10 300 euros
Price test motorcycle * 11 540 euros
Additional costs 390 euros

Compared to the F 800 ST


BMW

The BMW F 800 ST has been around since 2006.

The modifications compared to the F 800 ST are extensive, but not always obvious:

The performance increased nominally by five to 90 hp.

The fork is 15 mm shorter, reducing the seat height to 800 mm.

The swing arm has been extended by 50 mm to increase stability.

The costume and the windshield have been redesigned and now offer noticeably more wind and weather protection.

The rims save a total of 820 grams in weight and also look more stylish.

The ABS was brought up to date and is now delayed with finer control intervals.

The automatic stability control (ASC) can now be ordered optionally.

The electronic suspension adjustment (ESA) for the rebound damping of the shock absorber is now available.

The payload increased by eleven to now 207 kg

Offers and price comparison for the BMW F 800 GT

Used BMW F 800 GT

The sports tourer BMW F800GT is a dream for every fan of longer and sporty trips. The nice thing is that the F 800 GT can be found on the used motorcycle exchange in good condition and at a reasonable price. It’s definitely worth taking a look: Used BMW F 800 GT in Germany

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