Test: KTM 1190 RC8 R, Triumph Daytona 675 R, Suzuki GSX-R750

Test: KTM 1190 RC8 R, Triumph Daytona 675 R, Suzuki GSX-R750
Tech Art Photography

Super athletes in the concept comparison test

KTM 1190 RC8 R, Triumph Daytona 675 R, Suzuki GSX-R 750

Content of

Exotic? Are the KTM 1190 RC8 R, Suzuki GSX-R 750 and Triumph Daytona 675 R even exotic? In view of the dominance of ultra-powerful 1000-cubic four-cylinder engines in all paddocks, definitely.

But hey, let’s be honest: only dead fish go with the flow. Our three missiles are definitely not swimming with them.

B.Example KTM: A twin with 1190 cubic meters, without desmodromic valve control, without red paint, instead with a 75 degree cylinder angle, under-engine exhaust and polarizing appearance. Or the Suzuki. 250 cubic centimeters and at least 30 hp past the standard mash. Other qualities are required. Or the Triumph: the three-cylinder engine alone makes it stand out from the crowd. The Öhlins chassis, all sorts of carbon particles and its automatic gearshift give it additional shine. So class instead of mass? After all, there must be a reason why everyone else in Hockenheim and on the Landstrasse trust this thousands of power so much. Let’s drive it out. First at the ring, then in the Black Forest – then we know! But first we have to scare these scantily clad girls off the motorcycles. Hush, hush, off with you in the basket!

Three super sports cars on the racetrack: Triumph, Suzuki and KTM (from left to right).

FURNISHING
The KTM is brimming with useful and well-considered details. Let’s start with the chassis. On the fork, for example, the spring preload can be counted in clicks. This is much more precise and user-friendly than in simple turns and one of those small, fine details that the RC8 R offers in abundance. Another example: the handlebars are height and angle adjustable, the steering damper on the fork bridge is also adjustable. The mirrors with integrated indicators can be dismantled within two minutes, the distance between the clutch and brake lever can be finely adjusted.

Then the on-board computer. Adjustable in two information levels: Road and Race. Road highlights the information that is important for the road: speed, engine speed, either large or small gear indicator, remaining range, and and and. In race mode, the corresponding functions such as lap timer and the large gear display that can be selected. The variety of settings just goes on under the driver. The footrests, which are a bit low ex works, are height-adjustable in two ways, as is the entire rear frame including the bench.

The circuit diagram can be easily reversed, and the license plate holder including turn signals can be removed in less than five minutes. There are even more options for coordinating the hindquarters: The compression damping of the shock absorber can be adjusted in high and low speed, rebound damping and spring preload are conventional – and easily accessible, which is not the case with every super sports car. Then there is the eccentric in the strut linkage, with which the rear height and the swing arm angle of the RC8 R can be changed. Its position has a considerable influence on the level and thus the driving behavior of the burner. First conclusion: Despite the loss of the forged wheels that were still installed on the predecessor, the 1190 is a true equipment monster.

At KTM, it’s easy to ignore the bare facts of the grid girls. It becomes more difficult when circling the GSX-R 750. Here, Suzuki standard goods are presented in the unsurprising standard GSX-R look. But the adjustable footrest systems, the shock absorber with high- and low-speed compression damping, the three selectable injection mappings and the Brembo monoblock brake calipers are something.

And you are quickly drawn to the third party, the R version of triumphant Daytonas. The Triumph Daytona 675 R is also overshadowed by KTM’s mania for detail, but counters with the finest add-on components such as Öhlins fork and racing-proven TTX-36 shock absorber from the same company. And it is the only one in the test field to offer an automatic switch. On the tuning side, the standards on the Suzuki and Triumph can be adjusted, they are miles away from the variety that the KTM super sports car has to offer.

But what also has its good points. Because anyone who wants to use all the adjustment options on the KTM chassis has to have a lot of experience in order to work in the right direction. You can make a mistake in a flash and the 1190 RC8 R drives around the corner like a tractor. But even then, a clever KTM detail comes into play: lower the seat, turn it around, read off the standard setup stored there and adjust it again – done. It goes without saying that all three racers are equipped with a shift light and a lap timer. On the other hand, our setup tips for racetracks and country roads are not taken for granted. But looked enough, now out on the track!   

The KTM RC8 R offers pressure in all positions.

As if she were the top dog in the arena, the Austrian dashed onto the slopes, fearlessly plunging into the 1000-meter domain. With its linear power delivery and the very high mechanical rear wheel grip, you can plow through the field immediately, despite road tires and the somewhat hard jumps on the gas. The RC8 R is incredibly stable, neutral and also very full on the track, always feels slower than it actually is and goes meter by meter. Although the fork dips heavily on the brakes and the very relaxed seating position lacks some feedback from the front, the 1190 is a force in the braking zone and when entering corners. Simply pull in, throw the anchor, downshift and turn on the desired line.

No set-up moment surprises when the brake is released, no stamping messes up the line. Yes, if, yes we would have … Yes, if we had used racing tires instead of the already very good Dunlop Sportsmart series tires, then we would have ironed 90 percent of the thousands at the exit of the bend. So we have to leave it at 80 percent, because after clearly noticeable drifts, the big ouch comes quickly. The only thing that helps is switching to the Daytona 675 R, which is delivered on the very adhesive Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP. With her you can and must be on the gas early if you don’t want to look like Hans Wurst. Even so, a flush of anger rises when the thousands in the parabolic steroids fly past you. But just wait, the hairpin comes!

While the sails are being hauled in on one of the thousands, the spinnaker is still set on the 675 R. With pressure you push past the thick ships, cut in the sting very late and let the tightly tuned Öhlins fork tell you what is happening on the front tire. Thanks to the transparent repeat, the curve is braked up to the apex and tightened again at the same time as the brake is released. And oops, there are thousands behind you.


triumph

Triumph Daytona 675 R.

The Triumph 675 R is definitely made for the race, because the TTX shock absorber is also nice, sporty and firm and delivers crisp feedback. However, the very bony gearbox is still annoying. And the automatic gearshift can only really convince in the high gears. When changing gears up to third gear, the actuation force is far too high and the engagement of the gears is far too hard. Shift assistants from Dynojet or Bazzaz are much smoother and more effective. A real, extremely noticeable phenomenon, especially on fast slopes like Hockenheim, is that "Lack of performance", who is not. With a 675 R and measured 125 hp you are definitely well dressed, but if a thousand-meter driver is not a bad one, you have to stretch really long to get past him.

60 to 70 HP more power are very difficult to compensate on long straights. And the Suzuki? She looks like a wallflower towards the two strong European women. But be careful, whoever gets involved with her can strike her mercilessly. Their punch is enough to overtake those thousands of pilots who had to struggle with the Daytona. Its chassis is tuned very comfortably and never provides the clear feedback of an RC8 R or 675 R, but it definitely has reserves for a committed appearance at racing training.

If you often go on the slopes with the Suzuki GSX-R 750, you should try the following: Lower the front by five millimeters by inserting the fork. This makes the 750 noticeably more manageable, turns in more loosely and, thanks to the relieved rear end, can be put on the brake very easily by pressing the notch on the inside of the curve before turning. Not only does it look really cool, it is also a lot of fun. But: The brake, or the series spread in the GSX-R 750 is a disaster. While the stoppers worked flawlessly in the single test of the Gixxer (PS 5/2011), the current test copy defies all description.

After just three laps, the brakes let up so much that a two-finger brakeman from the test crew drove straight ahead at the end of the Parabolika. His fingers were stuck under the brake lever – deceleration ergo almost zero. It’s good that there is an asphalt run-off zone there.

Country road

A day later in the Black Forest, sunshine is the order of the day again on the Suzuki. Because the brake is far from the thermal range that brings it to its knees. Precisely because of the comfortable set-up, which was criticized on the race, the 750 scores points on the home track and limits the pilot’s ordeal to a minimum. Her seating position is quite passive, but you get used to it quickly.

The complete contrast program prevails on the Triumph. Their setup is definitely too tight for the country road, the Öhlins dampers hardly do their job even when the pressure stages are fully open. For the pilot, the ability to take and suffer is the order of the day. Anyone who moves mainly or even exclusively in public traffic is better served with the standard Daytona. Although the seating position on this one is also very sporty and front-wheel-oriented.

And the KTM? If you open its compression damping far enough, it becomes a racing pig again on the home track and drives everyone up and away. A real, very adaptable racer. Especially since, thanks to the many adjustment options, the seating position can be designed very humanely and individually.

KTM 1190 RC8 R.

fork
stat. neg. travel: 23 mm / 23 mm
Pressure level: 12 K./12 K. open
Rebound stage: 7 K./7 K open
Level: standard

Strut
stat. neg. travel: 12 mm / 12 mm
High pressure: 1.5 rev / completely open
Low pressure: 12 K./ completely open
Rebound stage: 2 K. open
Level: eccentric on "10 O `clock"

Steering damper
7 K. open

Suzuki GSX-R 750

fork
stat. neg. travel: 28 mm / 28 mm
Pressure stage: 4 U./6 U. open
Rebound: 3.5 U./3.5 U. open
Level: front lowered by 5 mm

Strut

stat. neg. travel: 11 mm / 11 mm
High pressure level: 1 rpm / 4 rpm open
Low compression: completely closed / completely closed
Rebound: 0.5 U./2 U. open
Level: standard

Steering damper
electric

Triumph Daytona 675 R

fork
stat. neg. travel: 31 mm / 31 mm
Pressure rating: 16 K./22 K. open
Rebound: 10 K./16 K. open
Level: standard

Strut
stat. neg. travel: 11 mm / 11 mm
Pressure level high: –
Low pressure: 22 K./22 K. open
Rebound stage: 2 K./2 K. open
Level: standard

Steering damper
not adjustable

Performance diagram + technical data

In this concept comparison, the KTM 1190 RC8 R lives in a world of its own. It delivers significantly more torque and power anytime, anywhere, and in a steady manner that really inspires.

KTM 1190 RC8 R.

KTM 1190 RC8 R..

drive
Two-cylinder 75-degree V-engine, 4 valves / cylinder, 125 kW (170 PS) at 10 250 / min *, 123 Nm at 8000 / min *, 1195 cm³, bore / stroke: 105.0 / 69.0 mm, compression ratio: 13.5: 1, ignition / injection system, 52 mm throttle valves, hydraulically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain 

landing gear
Steel tubular space frame, steering head angle: 66.7 degrees, caster: 96 mm, wheelbase: 1425 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension travel front / rear: 120/120 mm    

Wheels and brakes
Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17"/6.00 x 17", Front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/500 ZR 17, initial tires: Dunlop Sportsmart, 320 mm double disc brakes with radially attached four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with two-piston fixed calipers at the rear  

measurements and weight
Length / width / height: 2050/830/1110 mm, seat / handlebar height: 810/880 mm, handlebar width: 665 mm, 204 kg with a full tank, v./h .: 52.8 / 47.2%      

Rear wheel power in last gear
115 kW (156 PS) at 266 km / h    

consumption
Fuel type: Super Plus unleaded. Average test consumption: 6.6 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 16.5 liters, range: 250 km         

Base price
16,295 euros (plus additional costs) 

Suzuki GSX-R 750

Suzuki GSX-R 750.

drive
Four-cylinder in-line engine, 4 valves / cylinder, 110 kW (150 PS) at 13,200 / min *, 86 Nm at 11,200 / min *, 750 cm³ bore / stroke: 70.0 / 48.7 mm, compression ratio 12.5 : 1, ignition / injection system, 42 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain.

landing gear
Light metal bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.5 degrees, caster: 97 mm, wheelbase: 1395 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 41 mm, adjustable spring base, rebound and compression level. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension travel front / rear: 120/130 mm

Wheels and brakes
Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17 “/5.50 x 17”, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 180/55 ZR 17, first tires: Bridgestone BT 016 “G”, 310 mm double disc brakes with radially attached four-piston Fixed calipers at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear

measurements and weight
Length / width / height: 2040/820/1140 mm, seat / handlebar height: 805/845 mm, handlebar width: 635 mm, 194 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 52.6 / 47.4%

Rear wheel power in last gear 
95 kW (129 PS) at 251 km / h

Consumption Type of fuel: Super unleaded. Average test consumption 6.0 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 17 liters, range: 284 km

Base price 
13,140 euros

Triumph Daytona 675 R

Triumph Daytona 675 R

drive
Three-cylinder in-line engine, 4 valves / cylinder, 91 kW (124 PS) at 12,600 / min *, 72 Nm at 11,700 / min *, 675 cm³, bore / stroke: 74.0 / 52.3 mm, compression ratio: 12 , 65: 1, ignition / injection system, 44 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain  

landing gear 
Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.1 degrees, caster: 89 mm, wheelbase: 1395 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 41 mm, adjustable spring base, rebound and compression. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension travel front / rear: 110/130 mm    

Wheels and brakes 
Cast light alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 “/5.50 x 17”, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 180/55 ZR 17, first tires: Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP, 308 mm double disc brakes with radially attached four-piston fixed calipers at the front , 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear    

measurements and weight
 
Length / width / height: 2047/796/1100 mm, seat / handlebar height: 830/845 mm, handlebar width: 660 mm, 191 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 51.8 / 48.4%    

Rear wheel power in last gear
86 kW (116 PS) at 236 km / h    

consumption 
Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 6.4 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 17.4 liters, range: 272 km    

Base price 
12,740 euros (plus additional costs)

Conclusion

Triumph Daytona 675 R, Suzuki GSX-R 750, KTM 1190 RC8 R (from left to right).

PS JUDGMENT

KTM 1190 RC8 R.
The current RC8 version is a blast. Super equipped, it is always at the forefront in all situations without holding the pilot too hostage. A deserved winner thanks to top quality on the racetrack and home track.

Triumph Daytona 675 R
The 675 has always been made to burn. The R version, however, is only recommended for the racetrack, as it is clearly too tightly tuned for most of the country’s highways.

Suzuki GSX-R 750
It is difficult for her to assert herself against the two sharp European women. Her real strength is the tough everyday bread and butter.

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