Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

51 photos

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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We have chosen a very special location for the top tourer comparison test.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The Gorges de Galamus are a gorge several hundred meters deep and only one kilometer long. Amazement guaranteed. This deeply indented, damn narrow north-south passage was cut and milled out of the stone by the wild waters of the turquoise-green Agly river.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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"This is one of the best areas for motorcycling in Europe", wrote the English colleagues of the "Bike"-Magazine, "with exceptional scenery, excellent bends and empty roads." You haven’t exaggerated.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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BMW’s new, water-cooled travel tourer R 1200 RT demands revenge.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The front wheel of the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Own: case narrow, tank and seat wide – tribute to the four-cylinder.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The Japanese four-cylinder car has had many loyal fans since 2001. The current AE version with 146 hp combines electronically adjustable chassis and conventional clutch.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Power pack from the engine of the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE is a stunner, pushes hard. Like a kind grandfather who can get angry if necessary.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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FJR – three letters, four cylinders and an announcement: touring with confidence and dynamism.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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It means learning: The Pyrenees are also Catalan on the northeast side of the high mountains, i.e. on the French side.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The Catalan road builders apparently did not know the term “straight”, preferring to line up curve after curve.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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“The Pyrenees (…) are gently curved, the sharp ridge is rare here, and all the peaks are round.” (Kurt Tucholsky, “A book on the Pyrenees.”")

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Such a sight does not come up every day.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Even with a pillion passenger, the Trophy is particularly balanced and homogeneous and conveys a lot of trust. On the plush, large seating furniture, a passenger feels as safe as in Abraham’s lap.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Clear structure with easy-to-read tachometer and digital speedometer. The on-board computer reserves the display field on the right. Practical knobs for headlight range adjustment.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Good in itself. But the rocker switch for the cruise control takes up a lot of space, while there is no separate one for adjusting the windows.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Target parade. When fully powered up, the differences become obvious: the optional XXL touring screen of the Trophy makes even the large windshield of the RT appear small, the more delicate acrylic glass of the FJR anyway.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Oh yeah! The Gorges de Galamus are an experience.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Well worth a 1000 kilometer journey for a 1000 meter gorge?

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Circles between the rock face and the boundary wall leading to the abyss is what the Gorges de Galamus say. The D 7 road is really tough…

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Sycamore trees shape the pre-Pyrenees. But also pine and cypress trees, bathed in magical, golden light.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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In the pillion step, the ground clearance increases, the drives
Yamsel as good as solo.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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From the 4000 mark, noticeable vibrations creep into the footrests and handles when driving at constant speed, and the bubble-shaped 25-liter tank tingles. He gave the 1300s the nickname “Buckeltourer”. Nevertheless, a sixth gear could not harm the FJR – for further spreading and speed reduction.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The FJR steps out of line with its two-armed swing arm and silencers on both sides.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The headers of the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The Yamaha FJR 1300 AE is equipped with a four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The British travel giant easily gives in, remains good-natured and predictable in an inclined position. The trophy circles the most angled curves at Trévillach nimbly and precisely, with great precision.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Similar concept as the RT: powerful cardan single-sided swing arm with torque support on the left.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The exhaust of the Triumph Trophy 1200 SE.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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BMW’s electrically operated “Dynamic-ESA”, copied by Triumph, couples three levels of the spring base (solo, solo with luggage, pillion passenger) with three damper settings (soft, normal and hard). Makes nine useful combinations.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The two-cylinder four-stroke box engine of the BMW R 1200 RT.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The mighty exhaust pipe is on the right.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The single-sided swing arm is now on the left for the water boxer.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The front wheel of the BMW R 1200 RT.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Turn and press: the handwheel (“multicontroller”) controls the most important functions including the navigation system, the thumb reaches all the switches.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The speedometer and tachometer are far apart under reflective glass. The brilliant color display serves up loads of information. Optional navigation system perfectly integrated.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Great: slim waist, perfect suitcase, sophisticated disguise.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Covering, frame, chassis, seats, drive – everything new on the RT. The 125 hp boxer twin has significantly more flywheel mass than the standard GS.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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While Yamaha and Triumph are theoretically translated to 270 and 275, respectively, the RT leaves it to be more appropriate with a maximum of 230 km / h. This coordination makes the economical and beefy boxer particularly lively and powerful.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The passes of the Pyrenees remain taboo, closed to snow. But the foreland winds up to 1000 meters.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The landscape looks very idyllic.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The Triumph Trophy 1200 SE.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Big and bulky: you have to take your hand off the handlebars to operate important functions. The menu navigation of the on-board computer takes getting used to.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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The manifold of the Triumph Trophy 1200 SE.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Round clocks with thin needles and a dominant thick border. Here, too, there is a multi-course information board menu – right up to the tire pressure. Unsightly tangled cables on the handlebars.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Plush: the most comfortable seats, XXL cladding, divining rods.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Dimensions and weight make the 135 hp triple tourer an imposing appearance. Its ride, suspension and seating comfort have been setting standards since the beginning of the 2013 season.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

48/51
The Yamaha looks more delicate and compact than the two more expansive Eurocrats. In fact, it weighs a whopping 306 kilograms.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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Simply huge, the Triumph, a real chunk when pushing and maneuvering. It looks extremely heavy because of the high center of gravity when lifting it vertically.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

50/51
Stopping and studying the map, an anachronism in the age of GPS? Hardly if the panorama is as beautiful as in Mosset.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Bilski

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After 91 years of boxer history and 36 years of RT tradition, the cylinders / heads are now bathed in water for the first time. In the thermally balanced water boxer, more efficient intake paths from top to bottom with large size 52 throttle valves and the compression increased to 12.5: 1 promote performance.

BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

Perfect equipment on two wheels

With three feel-good tourers out and about in the picturesque Pre-Pyrenees: BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE. Blessed with perfect equipment on two wheels, electronically adjustable undercarriages and characteristic engines, fired by two, three or four cylinders. Farewell to wanderlust!

A.In the beginning there was a photo in the British “Bike” magazine. It shows a motorcycle circling curve after curve amid bold rock overhangs. Mountain range on the right within reach, boundary wall on the left. “This is one of the best areas for motorcycling in Europe,” wrote the English colleagues, “with an extraordinary landscape, excellent bends and empty roads.” They were not exaggerating. The Gorges de Galamus are a gorge several hundred meters deep and only one kilometer long. Amazement guaranteed. This deeply indented, damn narrow north-south passage has been cut and milled out of the stone by the wild waters of the turquoise-green Agly river.

Buy complete article

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test
Perfect equipment on two wheels

R 1200 RT revenge. The evergreen Yamaha FJR 1300 competes with a fine, powerful four-cylinder. Here in the latest AE version with electro-hydraulically adjustable spring elements. These are now standard in the illustrious group of top tourers. Likewise cardan (logical), electrically adjustable windows (a matter of honor) and height-adjustable driver’s seats (that’s better). In addition, of course, suitcases, ABS and ride-by-wire for the sensitive control of the cruise control and traction controls. Plus extensive on-board computer as an entertainment program. The two Europeans also heat their butts for extra euros. The full feel-good program.

BMW R 1200 RT babbles and bubbles

The BMW R 1200 RT is the only one with its traditional drive concept that is clearly visible on the outside. After 91 years of boxer history and 36 years of RT tradition, the cylinders / heads are now bathed in water for the first time. In the thermally balanced water boxer, the more efficient intake paths from top to bottom with large 52 throttle valves and the compression increased to 12.5: 1 promote performance. 125 hp is 15 more than with an air-cooled engine. The Berlin Flat Twin starts creaking. Double-sided roller timing chains, intermediate shafts to drive the four camshafts and rocker arms above the four valves each make mechanical noises.

The babbling boxer bubbling from the fat exhaust sounds acoustically more discreet with the BMW R 1200 RT than with the R 1200 GS. Compared to the standard GS, the lengthwise crankshaft received an additional 950 grams of flywheel, the rotor of the 540 watt alternator 250 grams. Noticeable even when standing: with every twitch of the electric throttle, the load tilts from the middle position first to the right and then back to the left.

A full, familiar “Kalonk” accompanies the shift into first gear. So do Triumph and Yamaha. The FJR row quad runs sonorous, muffled and extremely even. Understatement as a sign of true potency.

Triumphs Triple lifts the engine speed at a cold start (oops, we probably stood by the gorge for a while) as if in blissful Kawa choke times for many seconds up to 2500. The hissing 1215 cubic three-cylinder grumbles when rolling out of the triangular silencer. Get off the parking lot and enjoy yourself. Simply huge, the Triumph Trophy 1200 SE, a real chunk when pushing and maneuvering. It looks extremely heavy because of the high center of gravity when lifting it vertically. Does not come up at first, then almost falls to the right. Uff, 317 kilograms are a full 35 more than the fully equipped BMW R 1200 RT – the new one weighs just as little as its predecessor, 282 kilograms. The Yamaha FJR 1300 AE looks more delicate and compact than the two larger Eurocrats. In fact, it weighs a whopping 306 kilograms.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

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Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

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All three motors slide nicely from below

All three engines move nicely from below, making shifting up early a pleasure. The clutch on the BMW R 1200 RT can be pulled very smoothly, but only moderately metered. It sits on the front of the engine and rotates in the opposite direction to the crankshaft. The FJR hand lever works the hardest. The Trophy rear derailleur is typically bony for Triumph. But it is surprising how well the colossus is balanced when starting. The fat bumbler starts moving in a dead straight line – without swinging to the left or right. His balance is right.

The Triumph Trophy 1200 SE turns in easily, remains good-natured and predictable in an inclined position. The trophy circles the most angled curves at Trévillach nimbly and precisely, with great precision. It follows every steering impulse absolutely directly and linearly, one to one. The high center of gravity, which promotes the first steering impulse, only has a negative effect when there is brisk curve swing. The elastic three-cylinder delivers its power in a strikingly linear manner. Its almost horizontal torque plateau serves the power very evenly, but also somewhat unspectacularly, without a kick. The British highland bull does not know the rapid increase in torque from 4800 tours like the two and four-cylinder.

Instead, the triple shines with spontaneous throttle response, low load changes and the slightest cardan reactions. In addition, there is its low-vibration run to the red light district, which you never have to enter heress.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

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Yamaha FJR 1300 AE is not a handling miracle

We pass picturesque rock formations and ridges that are reminiscent of Corsica, Croatia, then Scotland or the Swedish archipelago. Between granite and karst, you can get dizzy in the land of the Cathars. However, the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE requires a lot of emphasis on the adjustable handlebar halves. The elegant Yamaha is not a handling miracle on the stable Bridgestone BT 023 “E” tires, rather stiff at the hips. You understeer. Would lighter tires from Metzeler or Conti help? But then the early scratching footrests would be rasped off even faster.

FJR – three letters, four cylinders and an announcement: touring with confidence and dynamism. Your power pack from motor is a force, pushes hard. Like a kind grandfather who can get angry if necessary. Especially in S-mapping. S for sporty-sensual. The T-mode of the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE is more sluggish than touristy. In it you have to turn the electronic throttle further through a different progression for the same propulsion. Feels like you’re in fourth instead of third gear. However, the load changes in the drive train in S mode a little more (more direct throttle response!). Nevertheless, the Nippon cardan gets along well without torque support. In S mode, the four-cylinder seems to burn more fuel. 5.9 liters per 100 kilometers of country road are no fame sheet.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

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Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

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Yamaha FJR 1300 in the test


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Triumph and BMW more economical than Yamaha

The Triumph Trophy 1200 SE does it with half a liter, the BMW R 1200 RT even with exactly one liter less. But the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE cannot play its trump card, the turbine-like high-revving, powerful four-cylinder engine, on the little mountain roads. At least the running smoothness is correct at low, constantly changing speeds. From the 4000 mark, noticeable vibrations creep into the footrests and handles when driving at constant speed, and the bubble-shaped 25-liter tank tingles. He gave the 1300s the nickname “Buckeltourer”. Almost 100,000 FJR buyers worldwide love the FJR engine.

Nevertheless, a sixth gear of the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE could not hurt – for further spreading and speed reduction. Compared to BMW’s GS, the BMW R 1200 RT received a longer secondary ratio. But in our top tourer trio it turns the highest, at 100 km / h in sixth gear 3900 times, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE (they in the final fifth) reach 3500 rpm. While Yamaha and Triumph are theoretically geared to 270 and 275, respectively, the BMW R 1200 RT leaves it to be more appropriate with a maximum of 230 km / h. This coordination makes the economical and beefy boxer particularly lively and powerful. And the smoother running compared to the GS, the result of the larger centrifugal mass, fits the concept like sweet mustard with white sausage: perfect. The boxer pulsates gently: always noticeable, never annoying.

The BMW R 1200 RT also has two driving modes: In “Rain” mode, the throttle response is gentler, traction control and ABS intervene earlier. But now, with the dryness and the fantastic curves north of Ille-sur-Têt, the “Road” level fits perfectly. The third mode, called “Dynamic”, costs extra. He is almost too sporty-directly on the gas, allows more slip. It also includes an uphill and downhill aid. This means that when the engine is running, the BMW R 1200 RT is idling with the rear wheel brake locked, even on the steepest inclines or slopes.

BMW automatic gearshift is a special treat

When it starts again, the much lighter BMW R 1200 RT effortlessly sets itself apart from the rest of the duo in fast alternating curves. The RT steers in the most agile, not only because of the shortest wheelbase and smallest turning circle (5.30 meters instead of six meters) is the most manageable in every respect. It is very easy to maneuver for such a bummer. The RT circles the tightest curve radii with bold cheekiness, and thanks to its low center of gravity, it can be easily tossed back and forth in the serpentine run. The Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT are sticky.

The colorful BMW cockpit can be conveniently controlled by handwheel on the left handlebar switch. The BMW instruments set standards in terms of luminosity and abundance of information. In addition, the RT has the best, because it is intuitively accessible operating concept. Unfortunately also the longest surcharge list. Over 4000 euros in extra “packages” lift the total price of the test motorcycle to around 21,500 euros. Hui. The Triumph Trophy 1200 SE is around 1800 euros cheaper, the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE around 2500 euros.

One of the delicacies of the BMW R 1200 RT: an automatic gearshift that works in both directions as a world first! Simply put your foot on the gearshift lever with a little more force than usual and it’ll shift down – supported by the electronics with double-declutching. Ride-by-Wire automatically ensures that the throttle valves are in the appropriate position. You can keep the gas open when shifting up. On mountain roads, it is enriching to change gears in no time without using the clutch. That makes the mood and actually clears your head on tour. For such experiences, Yamaha offers the 1000 Euro more expensive AS version of the FJR with an automated manual transmission.

Chassis in solo and pillion operation

A new test terrain awaits: the Col de Roque-Jalère pass leads up to an altitude of almost 1000 meters. The optional semi-active suspension of the BMW R 1200 RT has to show its colors here. The on-board computer processes information from the spring travel sensors on the two front and rear suspension struts. In the event of interference, it is supposed to adapt the damper valves to the current situation in real time. But on the first test motorcycle, the shock absorber was much too tight, downright uncomfortable. That distracted from the pure driving, as well as great wobbly in curves. It looked as if the front and rear tires did not follow the same line when leaning. The test could only be continued with a replacement BMW. MOTORRAD provides the findings on the defect.

But even with BMW R 1200 RT number two, the Paralever swingarm responded to small, hard heels in a bumpy, somewhat bumpy manner. The basic setting is more on the tight side. BMW’s electrically operated “Dynamic-ESA”, copied by Triumph, couples three levels of the spring base (solo, solo with luggage, pillion passenger) with three damper settings (soft, normal and hard). Makes nine useful combinations.

In addition to a large number of intermediate damping stages, the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE also offers the fourth spring base “pillion passenger with luggage”. It is exciting to see how the rear of the vehicle rises under you when it is tensioned while standing. In the pillion step, the ground clearance increases, the Yamaha drives just as well as it does solo. But without a passenger, this handling-enhancing measure makes the shock absorber work less comfortably. So better not. Regardless of the damping level in which the FJR shock absorber is underdamped in the rebound, it jumps out again too quickly. What causes unrest on mogul slopes, knocks you out of the saddle one time or another. The better damped upside-down fork speaks more smoothly.

Active and comfortable on the BMW R 1200 RT

The Yamaha FJR 1300 AE offers a modest 198 kg payload, the Triumph Trophy 1200 SE a lush 237 kg. The BMW R 1200 RT with a payload of 213 kilograms also adjusts the spring rate. Its “hard” damping setting is only suitable for smooth asphalt. At crawl speed up to around 50 km / h, the steering damper causes a minimal tendency to wobble. After the morning start, the BMW chassis needs a few kilometers until the damper oil flows more smoothly, everything really slips and responds sensitively. The Triumph still sets the bar in terms of ride and suspension comfort. Its WP chassis fishes out even deep potholes with sensational sensitivity, smooths bumps in the road, and levels out frosts even when the vehicle is on an incline.

The British comfort litter celebrates the S-Class effect on two wheels. Even with a pillion passenger, the Triumph Trophy 1200 SE rides in a particularly balanced and homogeneous manner and conveys a lot of confidence. On the plush, large seating furniture, a passenger feels as safe as in Abraham’s lap. The seating comfort is also great at the front. The high and wide, far oncoming handlebars and the footrests that are quite far forward require a very passive sitting posture. On top of that, enthroned high – the lowest level of triumph corresponds to the higher of the other two.

Nevertheless, the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE requires the longest legs: its seat is not pulled in as far behind the wide tank as on the RT and Trophy. At least the FJR allows the most space for long legs thanks to the smallest cladding. The low and quite hard FJR rear seat is the easiest to board. The crew sits actively and comfortably on the BMW R 1200 RT. The huge RT windshield with a large adjustment range finds its master in the optional Triumph windshield. Supreme behind both there is heavenly peace, you can drive with the visor open. And listen to the audio systems with radio / USB connection: for a surcharge and better sounding at BMW, standard and stronger reception on the Triumph Trophy 1200 SE.

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

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Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

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Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

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Bilski

With three quarters of all possible points in the MOTORRAD test, the BMW R 1200 RT is a real top tourer.

The Yamaha FJR 1300 AE has to fit. She is not a music steamer. And their much smaller pane protects less, shields less. When the helmet is raised, the glasses dance on the nose with the helmet open; when the shoulders are lowered, the current is quite calm. The window adjustment is now part of the on-board computer menu – without its own switch. In return, the Yamaha offers the most suitable mirrors and the least limited field of vision to the front. We screw our way towards the sky again, where a sturdy breed of cows licks the salt from the pitted asphalt. Here you have to be on your guard.

Like the Triumph Trophy 1200 SE, the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE activates two of the four brake pistons on the front right with the foot pedal. The Yamaha hand lever actuates the remaining six pistons with a crisp dose. But the 1300s gets stubborn on the brakes and hardly turns in any more. It glides more smoothly into the curves if you only brake “at the back”, i.e. lightly at the front. But the ABS control behavior of the second largest motorcycle manufacturer, especially with its touring flagship, is unworthy: it processes impulses clumsily, pushes the hand lever back and occasionally opens it for an irritatingly long time. As a result, the BMW R 1200 RT brakes better downhill on poor terrain than the FJR on the flat on top asphalt!

When the BMW R 1200 RT and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE brake fully from 100 km / h parallel on the flat, the FJR hits the place where the RT is, after 39 meters, at 35 km / h. Ouch! She needs a full 44.34 meters of braking distance. The sheer braking power of the RT is due not only to the barely submerged front (Telelever) but also to its ingeniously simple operation: The unfortunately muddy hand lever, which lacks a clear pressure point, always activates all three discs. The pedal only anchors backwards, good when turning. When you apply the brakes close to the physical limit, the RT rear wheel sometimes prances slightly. The Triumph Trophy 1200 SE remains more stable on track. In the end, the new BMW R 1200 RT is a bit ahead of the British. With three quarters of all possible points in the MOTORRAD test, it is a real top tourer.

Data and measured values ​​BMW R 1200 RT


Bilski

Paneling, frame, chassis, seats, drive – everything new on the BMW R 1200 RT. The 125 hp boxer twin has significantly more flywheel mass than the standard GS.

engine

design type
Two-cylinder four-stroke-
Boxer engine
injection Ø 52 mm
coupling
Multi-disc oil bath-
clutch (anti-hopping)
Bore x stroke  101.0 x 73.0 mm
Displacement 1170 cc
compression 12.5: 1
power
92.0 kW (125 PS)
at 7750 rpm
Torque 125 Nm at 6500 rpm

landing gear

frame
Load-bearing engine-
Transmission network

fork

trailing arm
Telescopic fork, Ø 37 mm Steering damper hydraulically Brakes front / rear  Ø 320/276 mm Assistance systems ABS, traction control bikes 3.50 x 17; 5.50 x 17 tires
120/70 ZR 17;
180/55 ZR 17 Tires Michelin Pilot Road 4 GT

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

Tourer


Comparative test: top tourers from BMW and Triumph


BMW R 1200 RT and Triumph Trophy 1200 SE in comparison


read more

All used offers: BMW R 1200 RT

mass and weight


Bilski

The single-sided swing arm is now on the left for the water boxer.

wheelbase 1485 mm
Steering head angle 63.6 degrees
trailing 116 mm
Front / rear suspension travel  120/136 mm
Seat height ** 800/820 mm
Weight with full tank ** 282 kg
Payload ** 213 kg
Tank capacity / reserve 25.0 / 4.0 liters
Service intervals 10,000 km
price 16,990 euros
Price test motorcycle 21060 Euro²
Additional costs 390 euros

** MOTORCYCLE measurements; ²Comfort package (770 euros),
Touring package (1270 euros), dynamic package (1020 euros),
Audio system (1010 euros)

MOTORCYCLE readings

Top speed 225 km / h *
acceleration
0-100 km / h
0-140 km / h
0-200 km / h
3.4 sec
5.8 sec
13.4 sec
Draft
60-100 km / h
100-140 km / h
140-180 km / h
3.9 sec
4.2 sec
5.4 sec
Consumption country road / 100 km  4.9 liters / super
Reach country road 510 km
* Manufacturer information

Data / measured values ​​Triumph Trophy 1200 SE


Bilski

Dimensions and weight make the 135 hp triple tourer an imposing appearance. Its ride, suspension and seating comfort have been setting standards since the beginning of the 2013 season.

engine

design type

Three-cylinder four-stroke-
In-line engine
injection
Ø 46 mm
coupling

Multi-panes-
Oil bath clutch
Bore x stroke 
85.0 x 71.4 mm
Displacement
1215 cc
compression
11.0: 1
power

99.0 kW (135 hp)
at 8900 rpm
Torque
120 Nm at 6450 rpm

landing gear

frame

Bridge frame made of aluminum,
Motor supporting

fork

Upside-down fork,
Ø 43 mm Steering damper
Brakes front / rear 
Ø 320/282 mm Assistance systems
ABS, traction control bikes
3.50 x 17; 6.00 x 17 tires

120/70 R 17;
190/55 R 17 Tires
Pirelli Angel ST, front “A”

Tourer BMW R 1200 RT, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE and Yamaha FJR 1300 AE in the test

Tourer


Comparative test: top tourers from BMW and Triumph


BMW R 1200 RT and Triumph Trophy 1200 SE in comparison


read more

mass and weight


Bilski

Big and bulky: you have to take your hand off the handlebars to operate important functions. The menu navigation of the on-board computer takes getting used to.

wheelbase
1542 mm
Steering head angle
63.0 degrees
trailing
119 mm
Front / rear suspension travel 
127/120 mm
Seat height **
820/835 mm
Weight with full tank **
317 kg
Payload **
237 kg
Tank capacity / reserve
26.0 / 4.0 liters
Service intervals
16,000 km
price
18,670 euros
Price test motorcycle
19,215 euros³
Additional costs
450 euros
** MOTORCYCLE measurements; ³Luggage rack (145 euros),
Grip heating (185 euros), touring screen (215 euros)

MOTORCYCLE readings

Top speed 222 km / h
acceleration
0-100 km / h
0-140 km / h
0-200 km / h
4.0 sec
6.6 sec
14.7 sec
Draft
60-100 km / h
100-140 km / h
140-180 km / h
5.2 sec
5.5 sec
7.7 sec
Consumption country road / 100 km  5.3 liters / super
Reach country road 491 km

Data / measured values ​​Yamaha FJR 1300 AE


Bilski

The Japanese four-cylinder car has had many loyal fans since 2001. The current AE version with 146 hp combines electronically adjustable chassis and conventional clutch.

engine

design type

Four-cylinder four-stroke-
In-line engine
injection
Ø 42 mm
coupling

Multi-panes-
Oil bath clutch
Bore x stroke 
79.0 x 66.2 mm
Displacement
1298 cc
compression
10.8: 1
power

107.5 kW (146 hp)
at 8000 rpm
Torque
138 Nm at 7000 rpm

landing gear

frame

Bridge frame
aluminum

fork

Upside-down fork,
Ø 48 mm Steering damper
Brakes front / rear 
Ø 320/282 mm Assistance systems
ABS, traction control bikes
3.50 x 17; 5.50 x 17 tires

120/70 ZR 17;
180/55 ZR 17 Tires
Bridgestone BT 023 “E”

mass and weight


Bilski

The Yamaha FJR 1300 AE is equipped with a four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine.

wheelbase
1515 mm
Steering head angle
64.0 degrees
trailing
109 mm
Front / rear suspension travel 
135/125 mm
Seat height **
795/815 mm
Weight with full tank **
306 kg
Payload **
198 kg
Tank capacity / reserve
25.0 / 5.5 liters
Service intervals
10,000 km
price
18,795 euros
Price test motorcycle
18,795 euros
Additional costs
230 euros
** MOTORCYCLE measurements

MOTORCYCLE readings

Top speed 245 km / h *
acceleration
0-100 km / h
0-140 km / h
0-200 km / h
3.2 sec
5.6 sec
12.2 sec
Draft
60-100 km / h
100-140 km / h
140-180 km / h
4.7 sec
4.6 sec
5.5 sec
Consumption country road / 100 km  5.9 liters / super
Reach country road 424 km
* Manufacturer information

Equipment in detail


Bilski

The landscape looks very idyllic.

cockpit

BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE
Average / instantaneous consumption  x / x x / x x / x
Average speed x x
second trip odometer x x x
Ambient temperature display x x x
Engine temperature bar bar ° Celsius
Gear indicator x x x
Fuel gauge / timer x (bar) / x  x (bar) / x x (bar) / x
Range / travel time x / x x / x x / x
On-board voltage in volts x x symbol

x = series; o = optionally available; – = not available
* included in the comfort package (770 euros): chrome-plated silencer,
Central locking with anti-theft alarm system,
Socket; ² Included in the touring package (1270 euros): Dynamic ESA
(electronic chassis), preparation of navigation device, cruise control,
Seat heating; ³ Included in the dynamic package (1020 euros): daytime running lights, Hill Start
Controll, Driving Modes Pro, Shift Assistant Pro

Engine / chassis

BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE
Oil level check
electr. Display/ 
Sight glass
Sight glass

Sight glass

electronically adjustable chassis  o (€ 760) ² x x
different engine mappings x (two; third³)  x (two)

x = series; o = optionally available; – = not available
* included in the comfort package (770 euros): chrome-plated silencer,
Central locking with anti-theft alarm system,
Socket; ² Included in the touring package (1270 euros): Dynamic ESA
(electronic chassis), preparation of navigation device, cruise control,
Seat heating; ³ Included in the dynamic package (1020 euros): daytime running lights, Hill Start
Controll, Driving Modes Pro, Shift Assistant Pro

ergonomics

BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE
Disc inclination / height
x / x x / x x / x
adjustable seat height x (double)  x (double) x (double)
adjustable handlebar position x (triple)
adjustable brake / clutch lever   x / x x / x x / x
Touring screen o (270 €) o (215 €) o (€ 249.95)

x = series; o = optionally available; – = not available
* included in the comfort package (770 euros): chrome-plated silencer,
Central locking with anti-theft alarm system,
Socket; ² Included in the touring package (1270 euros): Dynamic ESA
(electronic chassis), preparation of navigation device, cruise control,
Seat heating; ³ Included in the dynamic package (1020 euros): daytime running lights, Hill Start
Controll, Driving Modes Pro, Shift Assistant Pro

Luggage

BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE
Luggage hook x
central locking system x (565 €) *
Case system including holder x x x
Case width 900 mm 990 mm 920 mm
Weight per case l./r. 6.9 / 5.7 kg 7.0 / 6.8 kg 5.3 / 5.3 kg
Volume per case l./r. 37/37 liters 28/29 liters 39/39 liters
Topcase including holder 700/885 € € 613 € 659.95
Inner pockets (set) o (180 €) o (69 €) o (€ 99.95)
Topcase volume 49 liters 55 liters 39 liters
Tank bag o (262 €) o (199 €) o (€ 139.95)
One key system
x (central cons- 
locking) *
x x
Luggage rack x x x
Storage compartment in the panel  x (2) x (1) x (1)

x = series; o = optionally available; – = not available
* included in the comfort package (770 euros): chrome-plated silencer,
Central locking with anti-theft alarm system,
Socket; ² Included in the touring package (1270 euros): Dynamic ESA
(electronic chassis), preparation of navigation device, cruise control,
Seat heating; ³ Included in the dynamic package (1020 euros): daytime running lights, Hill Start
Controll, Driving Modes Pro, Shift Assistant Pro

Furnishing

BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE
Heated grips x (five levels)  o (185 €, 2-stage)  x (ten levels)
Seat heating driver / front passenger o (€ 252/222) ²  o (279/279 €)
Cruise control x x x
Automatic switch o (€ 440) ³
navigation system o € 860
Main stand x x x
Immobilizer x x x
Headlight range adjustment
Swivel lever
3-stage
electric mechanically
Board socket
x (1, second:
20 €)
x (3) x (1, second
50 €)
Stainless steel exhaust system
x (chrome-plated
125 €) *
x x
Single-sided swing arm x x
Tank volume / reserve 25/4 liters 26/4 liters 27 / 5.5 liters
Audio system / USB + iPod connection  o / o (1020 €) x / x

x = series; o = optionally available; – = not available
* included in the comfort package (770 euros): chrome-plated silencer,
Central locking with anti-theft alarm system,
Socket; ² Included in the touring package (1270 euros): Dynamic ESA
(electronic chassis), preparation of navigation device, cruise control,
Seat heating; ³ Included in the dynamic package (1020 euros): daytime running lights, Hill Start
Controll, Driving Modes Pro, Shift Assistant Pro

security

BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE
Hazard warning lights x x x
Daytime running lights
o (€ 285) ³  x
Traction control / can be switched off 
x / x x (x x / x
ABS / can be switched off
x /- x /- x /-
Electronic tire pressure control 
o (210 €) *  x
cranked tire valves
x x
Steering damper
x

x = series; o = optionally available; – = not available
* included in the comfort package (770 euros): chrome-plated silencer,
Central locking with anti-theft alarm system,
Socket; ² Included in the touring package (1270 euros): Dynamic ESA
(electronic chassis), preparation of navigation device, cruise control,
Seat heating; ³ Included in the dynamic package (1020 euros): daytime running lights, Hill Start
Controll, Driving Modes Pro, Shift Assistant Pro

Performance measurement


BILLION

The performance measurement of the comparison test of the three top tourers.

In the touring-relevant range up to 5000 rpm, the performance curves are closely related. Okay, the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE climbs in cautiously below 3000 rpm, but then already “humps” at a good 3500 rpm. And in the second half of the engine speed range, it draws on the pool of more displacement such as cylinders. A great engine!

This also applies to the new BMW R 1200 RT: Despite identical values ​​for bore and stroke, i.e. the same displacement as the air-cooled predecessor, the water boxer delivers more power at every speed. The BMW twin is the only engine in the trio to achieve or even exceed the factory specifications. And so successfully keeps the slightly larger triumph triple in check. The three-cylinder develops its performance very evenly, without ups and downs, but also with little kick.

BMW R 1200 RT engine concept


BMW

Largest individual cubic capacity with the smallest total cubic capacity. Fat 101 pistons with the smallest stroke percentage. Gas flow from top to bottom.

Triumph Trophy 1200 SE engine concept


triumph

The Triumph engine, which also powers the Explorer Enduro, looks massive. Balance shaft in front of the crankshaft, large timing chain slot.

Yamaha FJR 1300 AE engine concept


Yamaha

Compact four-cylinder, here the original version from 2001. Today, the 1300 FJR, like the RT and Trophy, has electrically operated throttle valves.

MOTORCYCLE points evaluation and conclusion


Bilski

The BMW R 1200 RT emerged as the winner.

engine

  Maximum
score 
BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE 
Draft 40 29 20th 25th
acceleration 40 27 22nd 30th
Top speed 30th 18th 17th 22nd
Engine characteristics  30th 25th 24 25th
Responsiveness 20th 14th 15th 14th
Load change 20th 13 16 13
Smoothness 20th 11 14th 13
coupling 10 8th 7th 7th
circuit 20th 16 13 14th
Gear ratio 10 8th 7th 7th
Start 10 9 8th 9
total 250 178 163 179

Old, strong, good: thanks to the update, the beefy FJR four-cylinder is fully up to date, accelerating the six hundredweight rapidly. Even more powerful, however, is the shorter-geared boxer of the BMW R 1200 RT. Its optional shift assistant makes shifting up and down on winding roads a pleasure. If you do have to couple: the lever is easy to move, but the dosage is not ideal. The Triumph-Triple, with its weaker performance, runs with little vibration and load change.
Winner engine: Yamaha FJR 1300 AE

landing gear

  Maximum
score 
BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE 
Handiness 40 24 21st 18th
Stability in turns 40 30th 30th 27
Steering behavior 40 28 28 24
feedback 10 6th 7th 7th
Inclined position 20th 16 16 13
Straight-line stability 20th 16 14th 16
Suspension tuning in front 20th 16 17th 15th
Chassis set-up at the rear 20th 14th 17th 13
Adjustment options undercarriage  10 8th 8th 8th
Suspension comfort 10 7th 8th 7th
Driving behavior with a passenger 20th 17th 18th 17th
total 250 182 184 165

The Triumph Trophy 1200 SE wins the suspension rating, which is particularly important for touring riders. It arrows through curves precisely and remains steadfastly on course. Its spring elements are almost perfectly matched, very comfortable. The heavy trophy is the most relaxed with a pillion rider. The equally stable and more manageable, almost sporty BMW R 1200 RT lacks a little feedback. The Yamaha FJR 1300 AE folds stubbornly and hits the ground early when it is inclined, and runs particularly well in a straight line like the RT.
Chassis winner: Triumph Trophy 1200 SE

everyday life

  Maximum
score 
BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE 
Ergonomics driver 40 35 35 34
Ergonomics pillion 20th 17th 18th 18th
Windbreak 20th 18th 19th 16
view 20th 11 10 15th
light 20th 16 18th 18th
Furnishing 30th 30th 30th 30th
Handling / maintenance  30th 21st 18th 16
Luggage storage 10 9 10 8th
Payload 10 9 10 6th
Range 30th 30th 30th 27
processing 20th 16 15th 16
total 250 212 213 203

That hurts BMW: But the Triumph Trophy 1200 SE embeds the passenger a bit better, offers unmatched wind protection with the touring windshield and (like the FJR) even brighter headlights. Only the Triumph has luggage hooks and an opulent load, while the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE lacks a large payload. The BMW R 1200 RT spoils with the smallest turning circle and the lowest weight. Generally speaking, the “equipment” rating ends at 30 points. Otherwise RT and Trophy could get even more.
Winner everyday life: Triumph Trophy 1200 SE

security

  Maximum
score 
BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE 
Braking effect
40 30th 28 25th
Brake metering
30th 18th 20th 22nd
Braking with a passenger / fading
20th 15th 16 16
Righting moment when braking 
10 7th 7th 6th
ABS function
20th 16 13 11
Handlebar slapping
20th 18th 18th 18th
Ground clearance
10 9 8th 7th
total
150
113
110
105

Well, RT! Sure, BMW can. Thanks to enormous ground clearance, brute braking effect and ideal integral braking system. The muddy pressure point on the hand lever and the prancing rear wheel when braking hard are bothersome. The ABS of the Yamaha FJR 1300 AE regulates roughly, its tendency to erect is annoying.
Safety winner: BMW R 1200 RT

costs

  Maximum
score 
BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE 
guarantee 30th 17th 20th 15th
Consumption (country road)
30th 20th 18th 15 (consumption
in S mode)
Inspection costs 20th 18th 20th 16
Maintenance costs 20th 8th 8th 6th
total
100 63 66 52

Exemplary, triumph! A two-year extension guarantee to the two-year manufacturer’s guarantee and full 16,000 maintenance intervals are great.
Winner costs: Triumph Trophy 1200 SE

Overall rating

  Maximum
score 
BMW
R 1200 RT 
triumph
Trophy 1200 SE 
Yamaha
FJR 1300 AE 
Overall rating 1000 748 736 704
placement
1. 2. 3.
Price-performance note 
1.0 2.6 2.7 3.1

The BMW R 1200 RT is the most expensive machine of the trio, but still offers the best value.
Price-performance winner: BMW R 1200 RT

Conclusion

1st place, BMW R 1200 RT
The new BMW R 1200 RT is the most dynamic of the three tourers: Best handiness in connection with the lowest weight and the toughest pulling seduce to a cheeky driving style. In addition, there is complete equipment and the economical and lively engine. A little more suspension comfort on bad slopes remains on the wish list.

2nd place, Triumph Trophy 1200 SE
Anyone who can handle the sheer size, the many kilos and the high center of gravity will get the most luxurious tourer of this test in the garage in the form of the “trophy”. Still a block when standing, the Triumph Trophy 1200 SE rolls surprisingly precisely and nimbly even on poor roads. When it comes to comfort in all shades and wind protection, the Brit is great.

3rd place, Yamaha FJR 1300 AE
The Yamaha FJR 1300 AE is rightly a touring legend. As the least bulky motorcycle of the trio, it embodies the best all-rounder, blessed with a potent four-cylinder. Only the clumsy ABS regulation is unsuitable. And handling should be easier. The electronically adjustable chassis of the AE is an asset, this is especially true for the upside-down fork.

Pre-Pyrenees tips and information


Bilski

Lots of style and comfort at a moderate price: Hotel “Castell Rose” in Prades.

The city of Prades in the Pyrénées-Orientales department in the Languedoc-Roussillon region is a good address for touring riders. In the “Villa du Parc” the active motorcyclists Mireike and Oliver Zehner offer stylish accommodation and the best tour tips. MOTORRAD also likes to stop there. But just for this trip the two Germans were in
Vacation. The test team therefore moved into quarters next door – in the also very atmospheric, family-run hotel
“Castell Rose” with friendly, perfect English speaking owners (she French, he Swiss), a good choice. Price in winter for a single room: a reasonable 75 euros per night.

Literature from home is a good way to get in the mood for these captivating high mountains in Spain and France. For example the “Pyrenees” travel guide by MOTORRAD author Dirk Schäfer. The subtitle “Motorcycle paradise between sky and sea” does not promise too much. 96 pages in A5 format present ten tours that can be combined with one another. For 11.90 euros, published by Highlights-Verlag. The band “Pyrenees” from the series “The most beautiful motorcycle tours” published by Bruckmann Verlag makes you want to drive off. Author Markus Golletz promises “dream tours between the Atlantic and the Mediterranean”. 144 pages of 23.4 x 16.4 centimeters offer atmospheric photos in 13 chapters for 19.99 euros – including tips on how to get there.

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