Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
Henniges

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report

27 photos

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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… The steering stop is also larger.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Playful colorful details such as engine protection bars or footrests complete the picture.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Benders Echte: The Bender Brothers from Karlsruhe created an enduro in old-school style.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Components such as start number plates, crash pads or mudguard holders are made of aluminum …

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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… Even the bench was modeled after the 1970s style and is more comfortable than the original. Otherwise there are many add-on parts from the Yamaha XT range: …

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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… For example, the fork and passenger footrests including the holder come from an XT 600, type 3TB.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Walzwerk Racing focuses on style and function.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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The braking effect is fantastic, the engine is super-attached to the gas thanks to a special mapping, …

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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… and the aluminum tank cap has a retro look.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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… These are also used to make a cool pinstripe on the tank.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Marcus Walz even took another look at the Zard exhaust system and shortened it for visual reasons …

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Refiner LSL is starting with a flat tracker. Also here triple clamps are mounted with a lower offset …

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Features such as belt drive with additional tension pulley or on-
agile Kineo spoked wheels also testify to the love of technology.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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… but also for the sound. That can confidently be described as the rumble of thunder.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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The most conspicuous modification comes from Italy – and that doesn’t just apply to the paintwork designed by ten-year-old Moritz Brée, …

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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The basis for all conversions: Triumph Scrambler 900. 58 hp, 235 kg in weight, new price: 9390 euros.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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From left to right: “il Sardo” from Kingston Custom, Flat-Tracker from LSL, oldschool enduro “Tricolore” from Benders Echte, “Mojave” from Walzwerk Racing, Nolan-Scrambler and “Flat Track” from Free Spirits.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Kingston Custom: Clean, light, funky and functional: the frame and many attachments are nickel-plated, …

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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… Brake pumps, brake levers and footrests come from motocross, and the rear frame is closed …

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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…Weight was saved everywhere. The “il Sardo” is based on old Metisse models, weighs only 190 kg and is the most off-road variant in this field.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Funny: An off-road sport medal is embedded in the hump.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Kingston Custom.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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Many of the add-on parts of the Nolan scrambler come from LSL …

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
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… So also the fork bridge, which has a lower offset.

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In conjunction with longer suspension struts, this makes the machine easier to steer.

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Aluminum fenders, a wave brake disc, San Remo rims as well
Öhlins shock absorbers and a Zard exhaust complete the picture.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report

Benders, Free Spirits, Kingstom Custom, LSL, Nolan, Walzwerk

Six unusual conversions based on the Triumph Scrambler were presented at Tridays 2014 in Neukirchen, Austria. MOTORRAD rode it and tells the story behind it.

UTo tell this story correctly, you have to turn back time. And maybe start with “Once upon a time”. Well, once upon a time there was a successful screenwriter named Uli Brée. He’s actually German, but has lived in Austria for over 30 years and invents up to eight 90-minute films and crime scene crime stories a year. Ten years ago he had the idea for a Triumph motorcycle meeting and called it Tridays. This event established itself over the years and now attracts almost 30,000 visitors to a small Austrian town called Neukirchen, which everyone just calls Newchurch.

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Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report
Benders, Free Spirits, Kingstom Custom, LSL, Nolan, Walzwerk

Six used scramblers for six customizers

Many who compete in the “air-cooled Triumph two-cylinder” class use the Triumph Scrambler 900 from the current model range. To drive a race with this thing and its 58 hp at 235 kilograms and micker suspension travel is a real challenge. So it was not surprising that more and more drivers were converting the Scrambler. Uli Brée, an avowed safety vest hater and gifted enduro rider, was also inspired and designed a motorcycle for the 2012 Rumble, which he called the Rumbler. This Rumbler – of course based on Scrambler 900 – was first the leading actor in a film called “Raise the Dust” and haunted all media during this time, because the Rumbler was and is cool. The companies LSL, JvB-Moto and Öhlins realized it.

Uli Brée, who lives under one roof with 20 of his own motorcycles, chose the Rumbler as his personal favorite bike and after Tridays 2013 came up with the idea of ​​buying six used scramblers and passing them on to six customizers. These guys had absolutely free rein to reinterpret the bike. The only condition: Everyone has to show up with their conversion on Tridays 2014 and participate in the Rumble.

Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report

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Triumph Scrambler conversions in the driving report

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All scrambler tags in the music video "For the ride"

So the experts from the Italian custom bike manufacturer Free Spirits around Marcello Fontana took on the project, and well-known labels from Germany such as Walzwerk Racing, LSL, Kingston Custom or Benders Echte started. Even helmet manufacturer Nolan tried a new interpretation of the scrambler theme and sent a slightly modified 900 to Sardinia. Because on the Italian island the secret of the conversions was first revealed at the end of May. Both the customizers and their motorcycles met during the video shoot for Jimmy Cornett’s new song “For the Ride” and were able to mutually experience how individual a single model can be.

At this event, not only a fabulous video was created in which the motorcycles and their builders are admired supporting actors. In addition, the conversions had to prove their worth over 1200 kilometers over sticks, stones, gravel and asphalt on stretches full of curves. How differently one and the same motorcycle drives when experts realize their dream, MOTORRAD was allowed to test on site and present the conversions. Simply magical.

Kingston Custom


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Clean, light, funky and functional: the Kingston Custom.

Renovation “il Sardo”

The “il Sardo” is by far the most extraordinary project. You can tell from the machine that Dirk Oehlerking has a background in off-road sports and, in addition to a lot of know-how, has good manual skills. The frame was chemically stripped of paint, then sanded, redesigned and nickel-plated by hand. Here alone, Dirk saved around six kilograms by flexing off “superfluous holders”. Many parts are handmade; for the brake pumps, brake levers and footrests, he relies on parts from the Yamaha motocross range. Other lightweight components: lithium-ion battery, side stand, headlights, YSS shock absorbers. A MotoGadget speedometer provides the most important information, and the brake and rear lights are integrated into the tiny indicators. More interesting, however, are its ingenious solutions, such as the ignition lock attachment: This is attached to the screw for the engine mount. Further information: www.kingston-custom.de. Price of the conversion: 20,000 euros.

Driving impression

The lightest machine in the field drives easily in the field, but still pushes easily over the front wheel. On the chassis side, the “il Sardo” is very harmonious, but also tightly tuned, the spring elements respond cleanly. The seating position takes getting used to: the wide handlebars are far away from the seat. The gap between the seat and the tank makes it difficult to slide forward in the terrain. The rear brake is extremely effective and perfectly adjustable, and is ideal for all kinds of off-road activities. It is worlds ahead of those of the other five. The engine breathes freely through open K&N air filter and hangs sharp on the gas. The fact that you burn your right leg on the short exhaust pipe annoys Dirk Oehlerking himself the most. When the machine is presented at the Tridays, the problem should be solved by an additional heat shield. The mounted Mitas tires gave little confidence on the road.

Free spirits


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The most noticeable modification comes from Italy – and that applies not only to the paintwork that ten-year-old Moritz Brée designed, but also to the sound.

Conversion “Flat Track”

The Italian custom forge Free Spirits has worked optically as well as technically. Parts such as adjustable Bitubo shock absorbers, fiberglass fenders, the maintenance-free, self-tightening belt drive, special clutch and brake levers, clamps for attaching the indicators, elaborately designed Kineo rims or longer fork tubes and fork stiffeners are evidence that this issue is taken seriously. The front suspension increased from 120 to 165 and rear from 106 to 146 millimeters. Many components such as fork plugs, engine protection bars, mounting adapters or brake fluid expansion tanks are anodized in color to match the overall design. The engine was not left untouched either: special control units in conjunction with open air filters and an underseat exhaust system are supposed to generate more power. The position of the silencers made a complex license plate holder necessary. More information: www.freespirits.it.

Driving impression

Why did the Italians christen the conversion “Flat Track”? The seating position is strongly forward-facing, and overall the machine is brawny and clumsy. You sit higher and the trumpets of Jericho are a joke against this brutal sound. The huge brake disc installed at the front decelerates better than the original, and the engine also pushes more powerfully. The revised engine map is particularly effective in the lower and middle speed range – here the twin provides significantly more torque. But also in direct comparison it has the greatest engine braking effect in push mode. If he ever ran. Because the “Flat Track” struggled with heat problems from day one. As soon as the engine got a little hotter, it stopped. Even 20 specialists on site couldn’t change that.

Nolan


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Many of the add-on parts of the Nolan scrambler come from LSL.

modification

The Nolan project bike was largely realized by the specialist LSL. Client Nolan not only ordered a motorcycle to ride in the Tridays Rumble, but also to exhibit it at various trade fairs. The following LSL parts can be found on the bike: short rear, aluminum rims, fork bridges, ignition lock holder, pinion guard, chain guard, footrests, seat bench, brake fluid reservoir, hand lever and also a start number plate. On the engine side, an Arrow exhaust was installed in conjunction with a modified map. The Arrow exhaust can be obtained directly from Triumph, but there is no ABE. Nolan is also the only participant in the scrambler conversions to use Touratech shock absorbers. The Nolan conversion rolls on Karoo 3 tires from Metzeler.

Driving impression

The sound from the Arrow silencer is subdued and quite pleasant. Unfortunately, Triumph has not homologated the system, although it is listed in the in-house range of accessories. In conjunction with a modified map for open exhaust systems (Triumph) and a shorter gear ratio (45 teeth at the rear instead of 43), the engine depends better on the gas, and the machine accelerates a little faster than in series production, especially from low speeds. The seating position is comfortable and the steering response is impeccable. The special LSL fork bridges were also installed here. The coarse-treaded Metzeler Karoo 3 is surprisingly stable in an inclined position. While the Conti TKC 80 rubs away noticeably when accelerating out strongly in an inclined position, the Metzeler remains quite stable in the same situation and still offers grip. However, the self-cleaning effect when driving in wet terrain is better with the TKC 80. The built-in suspension struts from Touratech respond cleanly and sensitively, offer very good comfort even when operated by two people and provide excellent damping. Unfortunately, they are only available on request from the manufacturer (www.touratech.de) and cost up to 1000 euros depending on the equipment.

Bender’s real one

“Tricolore” conversion

Raphael and Christian Bender based their conversion on enduros from the 1960s and 1970s. Of course, a 21 mm front wheel with 90/90 tires rotates at the front. The tricolor design by Bultaco or KTM ultimately determined the overall concept. Originally, a Marzocchi fork should be used, the setup of which should be tailored to the vehicle weight. Allegedly it was not possible for the specialist from Rottenburg to carry out the work within three months. As an emergency replacement, the fork and brake system from an XT 600 had to be used. “Deplasticization” was important to the benders. All parts such as both mudguards, side covers, start number plates, the chain and engine protection are made of aluminum. A dainty MotoGadget speedometer is emblazoned next to the ignition lock that has been moved upwards. The manifolds are self-made, the muffler comes from Omar’s Dirt Track Racing. Further information: www.benders-echte.de. Price of the conversion: 12,000 euros.

Driving impression

The sound is impressive, but also borderline and guaranteed to be annoying to the ears of German TÜV officials. Despite the use of progressive fork springs, the machine dips too deeply at the front when braking, which makes precise steering difficult. The front brake system is also clearly overwhelmed by the total weight and is actually reminiscent of the glorious 1970s. The converted Marzocchi fork might have been better here. On the engine side, everything remained untouched, but he breathes noticeably more freely through the open exhaust.

LSL


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Refiner LSL is starting with a flat tracker.

Conversion “Clubman T 860”

At first glance, the Clubman seems less pimped than it really is. It’s the little details that turn this bike from a scrambler into a flat tracker. A large part of the LSL Triumph collection can be found on the Clubman T 860: mirrors, wave brake discs, brake pump protection, fiberglass fenders, hand levers, headlights, pinion covers, aluminum fenders in the front and rear, footrests, bench or even black anodized spoked wheels, each 18-inch at the front and rear. The engine releases the exhaust gases through a Zard exhaust, for the suspension, specialist Jochen Schmitz-Linkweiler relies on Öhlins shock absorbers of the Classic MX S 36P type. A special, very wide flat-track handlebar ensures an upright riding position. Here, too, the fork bridge developed by LSL is installed with an offset of 52 instead of 60 millimeters. Further information: www.lsl.de. Conversion price: 7290 euros without vehicle.

Driving impression

Emphatically casual – that’s the best way to describe the ride on the Clubman T 860. The wide handlebars sit comfortably in the hand, the steering forces are low. The special fork bridge has a positive effect on the steering behavior. In connection with an enlarged steering angle (for this purpose three millimeters are flexed away at the frame stop for the fork bridge), the machine is very manoeuvrable. Although the very wide handlebar is not for everyone, it will certainly benefit novice drivers, because of all the converted Scrambler models, the Clubman T 860 is the most light-footed on-road. Of course, the street-friendly Pirelli Scorpion MT 90 are not entirely innocent of this. The chassis is also harmonious, the Öhlins struts are puncture-proof and optically fit perfectly into the concept.

Rolling mill racing


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Walzwerk Racing focuses on style and function.

Conversion “Mojave 900”

The idea behind it: Steve McQueen and the film “On any Sunday” inspired Marcus Walz to build the Mojave 900. The customizer from Hockenheim owns an original two-cylinder Triumph from 1969 in the same colors. According to its own information, the Mojave 900 weighs 26 kg less than the base. Marcus composed the bike design in the style of the original rumbler by Uli Brée and relies on parts from well-known suppliers for the conversion: Öhlins fork kit, YSS struts, San Remo rims, Zard exhaust, JvB fender, lamp mask and -Side parts, Enuma chain kit, LSL hand levers, handlebars, risers, footrests, brake fluid reservoirs and shift levers, braking brake discs, LED indicators, K.&N-Racing air filter, special ECU. More information at www.walzwerk-racing.com. Total price of the renovation: 20,000 euros.

Driving impression

Everything just fits here! The original brake pads bite into braking discs, but they do so with a bite and a very good pressure point. The engine hangs great on the gas and is particularly powerful in the lower speed range. The special mapping more than pays off. The narrow enduro handlebars go perfectly with the overall concept, as does the mounted Continental TKC 80 tires, which also cut a fine figure on the road. On a lean angle, however, it doesn’t offer as much reserves as the Metzeler Karoo 3 tires, some of which are fitted by the competition. The chassis is harmoniously tightly tuned for road use, and the response behavior of the cheap YSS dampers is also completely okay. Accurate and handy are the attributes that best describe the Mojave. It is a tool for perfectionists.

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