Triumph Street Triple RS driving report

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report

10 photos

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

1/10
Triumph has redesigned the Street Triple RS.

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

2/10
We were already able to drive the Streety on the country road and the race track.

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

3/10
The middle class naked pushes hard and powers through the rev range with good taste. The 765 triplet really perks up at around 7,000 rpm

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

4/10
In the meantime, the throttle response is pretty straightforward, very sensitive people would like a slightly smoother transition from pushing to load operation.

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

5/10
The automatic gearshift, which is now standard, works very well, and with the new model year it also enables clutch-free downshifting (blippern).

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

6/10
The ABS regulates much later in the “Track” position than in the “Road” position. In the hunt for the last tenths, however, the system intervenes.

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

7/10
As before, the Street Triple offers a wide adjustment range for fork and shock absorber, thus enabling a suitable setup for both country roads and the racetrack.

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

8/10
As lively as ever, the middle-class Naked peppers in and around the corners, enjoyable strolling at its finest!

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

9/10
If you want to celebrate endless wheelies, you have to deactivate the TC

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report
triumph

10/10
All in all, the British stayed true to herself despite the modifications.

Triumph Street Triple RS driving report

Successful optimized street sweeper

As a modern street artist, Triumph’s revised Street Triple RS serves two fields: the country road and the racetrack. In southern Spain we feel the Streety down here and there.

After Yamaha (YZF-R1) and Honda (Africa Twin), the British manufacturer Triumph is now also presenting its first Euro 5 bike. The new rules will take effect from January 1, 2020 and initially only affect emissions. For the manufacturer, this still means extensive interventions in the engine and its peripherals. Hinckley worked accordingly at the S.treet Triple RS on both the hardware and the software.

Same top performance, more pressure in the middle

Changed control times via a new exhaust camshaft, a completely redesigned exhaust with now two catalytic converters and an adapted engine mapping should ensure compliance with the standard. The highlight: The British want to have increased the power in the medium speed range by nine percent with the same peak output of 123 hp. Without a direct comparison with the previous model, a check is of course difficult. But the middle class naked pushes hard and powers through the rev range with good taste. The 765 triplet really perks up at around 7,000 rpm. From this mark on it ignites the afterburner, which gives the load an extra performance boost. The now shorter ratio of the first two gears brings additional dynamism. In the meantime, the throttle response is pretty straightforward, very sensitive people would like a slightly smoother transition from pushing to load operation.

Automatic switch can now also blip

The automatic gearshift, which is now standard, works very well, and with the new model year it also enables clutch-free downshifting (blippern). At most when upshifting under full load, the pilot feels with a clear jolt that the gears are meshing. The British carried out electronic fine-tuning for the remaining driver assistance. Unobtrusively, traction and wheelie control regulate the forward thrust of a pilot who is too vigorously attacking. Since the Streety still does not have an IMU (Inertial Measurement Unit) that detects and analyzes any driving condition with its acceleration sensors, these two features cannot be set separately from each other. In plain language: If you want to celebrate endless wheelies, you have to deactivate the TC.


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The same applies to ABS for hardcore attackers on the racetrack. It is true that the anti-lock device regulates much later in the “Track” position than in the “Road” position. In the hunt for the last tenths, however, the system intervenes. At first the pressure point of the brake lever hardens with a significant decrease in braking power. This is usually followed by a slight pulsation on the lever, which signals the pilot to intervene. Since the system also allows the rear wheel to lift off in this mode and thus wild stoppies, it should only be chosen by experienced riders.

Chassis unchanged good

The chassis, including spring elements and stoppers, remains completely unchanged. The British only adjusted the setup a little, for example by reducing the preload of the fork springs. As before, the Street Triple offers a wide adjustment range for fork and shock absorber, thus enabling a suitable setup for both country roads and the racetrack. As lively as ever, the middle-class Naked peppers in and around the corners, enjoyable strolling at its finest! All you can feel is a slight righting moment when braking in an inclined position, but this does not reduce the fun in the corner in the least.

Despite the newly designed panels, the viewer identifies the sweeper at first glance as a Street Triple. This also applies in particular to the headlights. Recently completely in LED technology, they look a little grimmer and also house strikingly styled position lights.

Conclusion

All in all, the British stayed true to herself despite the modifications. And keeps its previous price at 11,800 euros. That pleases both the traditionalist and the modernist. Streety art at it’s best!

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