Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

10 photos

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
Gargolov

1/10
The motorcycle speaks for itself, the creators call author Henniges all the important information.

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
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2/10
"Approval is still pending, but is in progress", grins Philipp. Everything except the exhaust is TÜV-compliant and has already been approved.

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
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3/10
A wild mix: Fehling’s stub, Honda fork, Kawasaki bikes and bicycle lights.

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
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4/10
Frame and attachments were not painted. It should appear as if the motorcycle had been waiting for its new owner in a garage for decades.

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
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5/10
Retain patina: Only really old screws were used for the project.

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
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6/10
Oil fingers and rust? No, everything just painted and airbrushed by: www.lackmuss.de.

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
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7/10
The frame comes from a 1947 Triumph T100, the peanut tank is from Harley-Davidson, the fork was donated by a 1972 Honda CB 250. The same colorful thing continues with the rims of a 1978 Kawasaki Z 650, the front brake system of a Honda CB 550 and the rear brake caliper of a Hercules K50. Plus a 12 volt bicycle lamp.

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
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8/10
… are not in it, you sit too uncomfortably for that. But 100 km in a row? No problem.

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
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9/10
Owner Philipp gets on the bike. Really long tours …

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
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10/10
Go well together: Philip’s everyday car and his triumph.

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Nothing to do with anything new

When the Triumph T 100 Racer was born in 1947, there were two wheels on a workbench. Or maybe it was two cases of beer after all?

S.you don’t know anymore. Damn it! Stainless steel fitter Crazy Harry, who earned his name through seemingly impossible steel constructions, is of the opinion that these Kawa rims from a 1978 Z 650 stood on his workbench and that is how it all began. His friend Philipp, however, says it was the tank that caused the object to start. Or maybe the old engine that had been in the corner for years? However, there was beer involved, a lot of beer in fact. 

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Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
Nothing to do with anything new

Philipp is irradiated

Chronologically it would be like this: Philipp is irradiated: At 15 he looks after an old Triumph Bonneville. Falls in love with her charisma and the sound. Three years later he bought his first Triumph, a Tiger 650, on the Veterama. In pieces. Unfortunately it was not complete. “I looked for the missing parts for three years until it finally worked.” The Veterama exerts a magical fascination on him. Like all parts markets, by the way, because Philipp can only get excited about old things. “I have nothing to do with new ones,” says the 47-year-old. 

His car, a Ford F100, built in 1955, also fits. A few years ago – there must have been many – he once again lugged a used engine home from the parts exchange: an air-cooled Triumph two-cylinder from a T120, with 650 cubic meters. Visually worn, technically questionable, 600 marks. Pig in a poke.

This drive, the heart of the Racer 1947, stood in the workshop for years, collecting dust. And Philipp drinking beer next to it with his friends. Because, interview: “If I’m not smoking, then I drink beer.” Incidentally, both would work at the same time. Even if it may not appear now – Philipp and Crazy Harry are light years away from stumbling alcoholics. They are bright minds with an incredible pioneering spirit, talent for improvisation and gifted technicians.

Peanut tank from an old Harley + Kawa cast wheel

At some point Philipp came across the cool airbrushed peanut tank of an old Harley, which was gathering dust on a shelf. And because he also has this kind of inspiration in his shoe creations, the dragster fan mentally foresaw what would arise from the tank in connection with the old engine: “My first picture was a dragster machine from the 1960s, optically designed so as if someone had pushed it into a barn, forgotten it for 50 years and now rediscovered it. ”He found the old T100 frame for this from a friend who sells historic Triumph parts. The year of construction of the frame ultimately determined the project name: 1947. 

At the same time, Crazy Harry had a couple of weathered Kawa cast rims on the table that would go perfectly with the project. And so that evening over a beer, the two forged the plan to build a Racer in 1947. What ultimately stood at the beginning – no matter But everyone agreed on how it should be: a casual look, extremely worn out, if possible only use old screws and used parts. 

Procurement tourism is immediately in full swing. A rear frame lengthened by twelve centimeters is bought in England, fork, brake system and many small parts are auctioned on Ebay, and from then on Philipp spends more time in parts markets than at home. Even if the end result seems wildly cobbled together to the unsuspecting, every little thing is carefully thought out: “For an old clutch lever with an original plastic protective cover from the seventies, I like to pay twice as much as for one without it,” says Philipp.

Why is the box so rusted?

The big end, however, was right at the beginning: “When I bought the engine back then, I thought: it turns, great, it can’t be that bad. But when we dismantled it, it was immediately clear: except for the block and gearbox, everything had to be new. Even if we used old, battered screws on the outside – on the inside almost everything is new: crankshaft, connecting rod, piston, cylinder, cylinder head, spur gears, primary drive, clutch. . . “In the summer of 2014, the 1947 Racer came into the public eye for the first time: it was on Tridays. And unfortunately also many before that who didn’t get the idea behind it: “Why did you forget the paint? Why is the box so rusted? “Harry and Philipp are speechless:” How else can you achieve the effect of building a motorcycle that has been forgotten? “

Philipp transports his baby to the drive and photo shoot in the back of his Ford. After just three courageous kicks, the twin starts up, runs smoothly and grumbles. “The approval is still missing, but is in progress,” grins Philipp. Everything except the exhaust is TÜV-compliant and has already been approved. He crouches a little relaxed, the pegs far back, the handlebars narrow, the upper body bent forward. “It doesn’t matter, I’m not interested in touring,” waves Philipp, pulls the cable and disappears off-screen. Crazy Harry senses the desire in the eyes of those standing around: “We have thought about it and from now on we will build two to three motorcycles per year under the label ‘Early Bird Bikes’.” The fire from the beginning could soon expand into a bigger fire. ..

Technical specifications

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947
10 photos

Pictures: Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

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Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

Triumph T 100 Racer 1947

Gargolov

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