Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

22nd photos

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

1/22
MV Agusta Stradale 800, Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and Yamaha MT-09 Tracer in comparison test.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

2/22
One for all: the clutch lever is the only one in the triple trio that cannot be adjusted.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

3/22
Thought ahead: handlebar clamp with thread for attaching accessories.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

4/22
Confined: Passenger pegs and large driver feet don’t really like each other.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

5/22
MV Agusta Stradale 800, Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and Yamaha MT-09 Tracer in comparison test.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

6/22
The MV Agusta Stradale 800 is styled right down to the last corner. Extra chic: rims and swing arm.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

7/22
The design of the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx emphasizes function and makes you want to go on adventure.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

8/22
Futuristic, sporty, functional: the layout of the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer aims to convince.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

9/22
MV Agusta Stradale 800, Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and Yamaha MT-09 Tracer in comparison test.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

10/22
Uli Bonsels, spokesman for Triumph Motorrad Deutschland.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

11/22
Yamaha MT-09 Tracer.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

12/22
Optional: Cases from the accessories program further promote the long-distance character.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

13/22
With the MT-09 and the rival 800, Yamaha and MV Agusta
fast road sweepers in the stable …

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

14/22
… They should have a few touring features and new names –
Yamaha MT-09 Tracer and MV Agusta Stradale 800 – but also suitable for long journeys with fun appeal.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

15/22
MV Agusta Stradale 800.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

16/22
Easy: upshifts and downshifts thanks to the Quickshifter with blipper function.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

17/22
Safe: easy-to-use power connection on the soft cases.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

18/22
Unfavorable: The compression adjuster is hidden exactly behind the frame.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

19/22
Triumph Tiger 800 XRx.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

20/22
Confusing: menu and mode setting via buttons on the handlebar and in the cockpit.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

21/22
Fix: Fork legs without adjustment options, but with a good basic setup.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
fact

22/22
MV Agusta Stradale 800, Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and Yamaha MT-09 Tracer in comparison test.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

Three-cylinder fun bikes in a comparison test

With the MT-09 and the Rivale 800, Yamaha and MV Agusta have fast-paced road sweepers in their stable. With a few touring features and new names – Yamaha MT-09 Tracer and MV Agusta Stradale 800 – they should also be suitable for the big trip with fun appeal. Triumph’s updated Triumph Tiger 800 XRx faces the two for an exchange of blows.

Sun and a light breeze from the Mediterranean await the test trio on arrival near Marseille. So perfect conditions. The British, Italians and Japanese consider the three-cylinder engines to be perfect for fun touring wagons in this case, as in the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and the MV Agusta S.tradale 800 are around 800 cubic centimeters or just above it. With exactly 847 cm³, the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer easily breaks the frame. The triples are also almost at the same level in terms of power output.

Buy complete article

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
Three-cylinder fun bikes in a comparison test

MV Agusta Stradale 800 now also 115 fiery horses at 11,000 revolutions on the data sheet. Only the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx holds back a bit in terms of performance. Your triplet, based on the 675 engine, develops 95 hp when the crankshaft rotates 9250 times per minute. But that should be enough for exquisite driving pleasure.

MV with limited space, but relaxed knee angle

Before the engines are allowed to develop their power in the tumult of hairpin bends and bends, they go to the first seat test. After all, the trio should not only inspire with entertaining scratching, but also score with long-distance comfort. And for this, the space available for the driver’s bottom, including the arrangement of handlebars and footrests, is of decisive importance. Ui, that’s tight here. If you get on the MV, you will immediately find yourself firmly integrated between the tank and the high pillion seat. Space to slide forward or backward? Not on the MV Agusta Stradale 800.

The position is cemented in place. The MV Agusta Stradale 800 pampers you with a relaxed knee angle. When reaching for the handlebars, on the other hand, things get a little strange again. It stretches towards the driver on high risers. Since the tank is also extremely short, the hands automatically grip more from above than from behind. It almost feels like sitting on the fork bridge. Even the small, height-adjustable windshield cannot protect. The helmet always hangs over it and not behind it. The Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer solve this better.

The Yamaha MT-09 Tracer is more comfortable. Compared to the MT-09 – as with the MV Agusta Stradale 800 – high risers take the handlebars between their clamps. It is also wider and less cranked than the Yamaha fun bike. Together with the sportily positioned footrests and the driver’s seat, which can be adjusted to two heights, the Tracer-Pilot finds himself slightly aggressive, but definitely suitable for long journeys. Only Triumph puts even more emphasis on the feel-good factor. Notches fixed far in front and a handlebar that stretches out strongly towards the pilot ensure an upright workplace with a good overview. The fact that the two-part seat bench on the Tiger – the comfort version of the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx – can be adjusted twice in just a few steps ensures an ideal knee angle for young and old.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

Tourer


Yamaha MT-09 Tracer in the driving report


Extremely suitable for everyday use, lavishly equipped


read more

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

Tourer


Yamaha MT-09 Tracer in the top test


Grace, space, pace


read more

All reviews and articles about the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer

Stradale the most expensive at 13,890 euros

The MV Agusta Stradale 800, which stands for an ambitious 13,890 euros at the dealer, hisses nervously from its new, enlarged front silencer with square tailpipes after briefly pressing the starter button. The other two cannot and do not want to keep up. The acoustic onomatopoeia and the price of 10,890 euros for the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and 9595 euros for the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer are much more reserved. But they always start reliably. Regardless of whether it is freezing or the engines are up to temperature. The Italian is a bit bitchier. Want to be asked for the first spark for a longer time even with a warm three-cylinder. Ultimately, the Italo triple can always be started after a short time.

Early in the morning the road for the first pass ascent is still shiny and damp. Better to adjust the driving modes for a smooth throttle response. The MV Agusta Stradale 800 offers the complete package called Sport, Normal, Rain and Individual configuration. The 52 kilogram in-line engine only delivers full power in the sport and individual setup. The settings Normal and Rain cut the performance significantly in some cases. What is noticeable positively: Despite the highest compression and the shortest-stroke design, the MV-Triple takes on the gas in all modes. Rolling along in traffic in the city with idle in gear six? Easy for the Stradale. It’s great that MV has finally fine-tuned the ride-by-wire system, including the control electronics. Many other models suffered particularly at this point.

Tracer equipped with three driving modes as standard

The load change behavior of the MT-09 tracer motor dispenser was also not quite perfect. Although equipped with three driving modes as standard, the insensitive throttle response and noticeable play in the drive train made it almost impossible to open the throttle valve in the Standard and A levels. Thanks to a software update, the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer can now do it much better. It only jerks slightly in the aggressive A mode. If the engine is running in the standard mapping, it can now be gently accelerated – only topped by the power-reduced B setting, which impresses with wonderfully smooth load changes. The Triumph Tiger 800 XRx is a bit simpler in this area. When it comes to engine tuning, you can choose between Sport or Normal. In both, the treble presses full power on the rear tire. Only the response of the throttle valve can be influenced. The transitions between different throttle positions always work extremely cleanly.

It becomes clear from the very first few meters that the choice of a defensive motor mapping in the slippery road conditions is spot on with the MV Agusta Stradale 800. The throttle response works without any problems, but the mounted Diablo Rosso II from Pirelli prefer it warm. Low single-digit temperatures and damp asphalt are not her thing. The Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and Yamaha MT-09 Tracer cope better with these conditions. Their tires (Yamaha: Dunlop D222 / Triumph: Scorpion Trail) have less sporty genes, but also provide reliable grip and trust-enhancing feedback in motorcycle-unfriendly conditions.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

motorcycles


MV Agusta Stradale 800 in the driving report


First step into the tourism segment


read more

All articles about the MV Agusta Stradale 800

All three trust ABS systems when it comes to safety

The sun is slowly pushing its way into the foreground, drying the streets. The Stradale quickly takes the first kinks in the road layout under the wheels. The brake, which can be adjusted very easily, also contributes to this. High-quality pliers, radially screwed Brembo pistons and a crisp pressure point: on the MV Agusta Stradale 800, decelerating becomes a pleasure. The Yamaha MT-09 Tracer also has radially attached brake calipers on its upside-down fork. However, getting the right braking power is not quite as perfect as with the triple from Italy. There is a little more movement in the lever, the last crisp feedback is missing.

The Triumph Tiger 800 XRx is similar. Their double-piston calipers bring the tigers to a safe stop at any time, but they need the greatest manual strength for this. When it comes to safety, all three motorcycles rely on ABS systems that should stop them without blocking. The Tiger demonstrates in an almost exemplary manner what is possible when stopping on the last groove. It guides the front wheel flawlessly and also reliably stays on track at the rear. The MV does that differently. The MV Agusta Stradale 800 lifts the rear when the brakes deliver maximum performance. Thanks to the fine controllability and most of the damping reserves of the fork, you still succeed in precise point landings with no rollover potential. The tracer is different. As in the top test, the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer surprises with coarse control intervals that in places open the brakes for far too long. The other way around, the Tracer likes to stand on the front wheel. Adjusting to this braking performance is difficult.

MV Agusta Stradale 800 something for curve junkies

Therefore, it is better to act a little more cautiously in the braking zones. Although the MV Agusta Stradale 800 would like to storm the pass faster. This is where their descent from the rival becomes noticeable. The Stradale longs for revs, develops a blazing combustion chamber fire at the highest revs. With a leisurely swing around the corner – she doesn’t like that at all. It is better to stretch the gas tap wide, always keep the chain properly pulled. The MV is always looking for the ideal line. Want to bend as quickly and diagonally around every radius as possible. I want to get straight through sections as quickly as possible. That is – admittedly – exhausting. But it is also irritating. The driver has to get involved with the Stradale, grab it neatly by the handlebars.

No driving maneuver can be shaken off your sleeve. The more relaxed the MV Agusta Stradale 800 strives towards the summit cross, the more idiosyncratic its driving behavior becomes. One example of this is the steering behavior on the brake. If you just put the pistons on gently and want to persuade the MV with a slight steering impulse to dive into an inclined position, it will ruin the line. Then it stiffens in the steering head area, only to tip inward the next moment. What was planned as a casual line through the twisting curves quickly turns out to be a staggering turn dance. In addition, the rear tire takes every asphalt wrinkle as an opportunity to stand up during a leisurely ride. So rather approach the Italian in a completely different way. Show her clearly who the boss is. Lead you with a hard hand and never let the pace drop in the direction of loafing. Moved like this, the Stradale captures the heart of every curve junkie.

Yamaha MT-09 Tracer, MV Agusta Stradale 800 and Triumph Tiger 800 XRx

Enduro


Driving report Triumph Tiger 800 XR, XC, XRx and XCX


X for offense …


read more

All articles about the Triumph Tiger 800 XR


fact

MV Agusta Stradale 800, Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and Yamaha MT-09 Tracer.

They should also be happy about the Quickshifter with blipper function for upshifting and downshifting as well as the finely regulating traction control. Eightfold adjustable, it helps to shift the personal “test-what-works” approach a little further. Until the rear wheel draws attention to the temporary overload caused by the power output with delicate black lines. The tip of the top tester Georg Jelicic, who can withstand full throttle, is therefore: Choose level three. The regulates sensitively along the grip limit of the rear tire without noticeably curtailing the propulsion. Anyone who drives the MV Agusta Stradale 800 with such commitment, however, has to put up with a slightly pumping tail. Since the motorcycle from Varese has a completely adjustable chassis, this could be significantly reduced with the easily accessible rebound stage.

If further coordination is required, however, it gets more complicated: The compression screw of the shock absorber is hidden behind the left frame. If you want to turn it, you can prepare for a lot of material removal. According to the user manual, MV even suggests removing the entire right footrest unit to adjust the preload. It’s okay in the garage at home, but difficult on the go. If everything fits, the fun bike impresses with a lot of fun with the rapid glow of the pass, which is only limited a little by the fuel consumption. With 6.4 liters on the moderate motorcycle consumption round, the MV Agusta Stradale 800 nibbled on the supply in the tank. The Triumph Tiger 800 XRx and the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer are satisfied with stingy 4.6 and 4.8 liters over the 100 km distance. So with the emotionally charged Stradale, the bottom line is that the touring suitability falls by the wayside. The standard soft cases, which nestle close to the rear of the Italian, cannot change that.

The Triumph Tiger 800 XRx can do long distances well

Long haul – I’m good at that, the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx throws in straight away. That’s true, also because the XRx version is blessed with many equipment extras. In addition to the comfort seat already mentioned, it is equipped with cruise control, a main stand and an additional twelve-volt socket, which makes it different from the XR sister model. The driving characteristics of the Tiger 800 are also fully in line with the touring driver’s requirement profile. The three-cylinder engine pushes gently through the speed range, but with even pressure. Only at the top does he easily run out of breath. But that is only really noticeable in a direct comparison.

Overall, the harmonious coordination of the engine fits in well with the character of the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx. Gear changes are easy. And the curve swing also works predictably. On the road with the narrowest tires (100/90 19/150/70 R17) of the test trio, the Tiger does not swing too much, but with precise steering behavior and very confidently through all kinds of curve radii. That ensures a lot of confidence in your own ability and that of the motorcycle. In this way, the fearful nipples that touch down relatively early can be scraped off the pegs in a completely relaxed manner. This automatically pushes the corners of the mouth upwards. However, there is one small limitation to the really brisk twist up the pass road with the Tiger: the traction control. Straight ahead, it regulates reliably on any surface. In an inclined position we could not determine any function despite provocative throttle handling. An individual case? We asked Triumph directly – see box on page 50.

In contrast, the suspension elements of the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx are almost unreservedly positive. Although the preload can only be adjusted at the rear and could respond a little more sensitively, they combine the requirements comfortably and tightly but better than the MV Agusta Stradale 800 and the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer. This can be seen very clearly on the worst asphalt. This is where the fork is best at ironing out bumps. The front wheel sticks to the ground as if it were smeared with Pattex. Stradale and Tracer act much more restlessly at the same speed.

Motor of the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer a real source of joy

The Yamaha MT-09 Tracer is still missing. As in the MT-09, its engine is a real source of joy. Even at low speeds, it pushes forward properly and lets it rip right out at the top. In terms of power delivery, even the MV Agusta Stradale 800 cannot keep up, which loses 0.7 seconds on the Yamaha when accelerating from zero to 140 km / h. What distinguishes the Nippon triplet is that it combines the two characteristics of the MV and the Triumph in one unit. Track down smoothly and emphatically from the corner – the Tracer makes it possible without grumbling. Even the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx can’t do that better. At the top, delight with pure revving pleasure – the Yamaha triplet also has the right answer for all sporty motorcycle fans who like to keep the revs close to the five-digit range. The tracers develop their performance so foolproof that it can be called up without any problems. The engine is good for everything and goes along with everything. Only the gearbox is stubborn, especially between gear two and three.

Yamaha also pursued a similarly universal claim with the chassis. Although the basic set-up is more on the comfortable side, the fork and shock absorber work very homogeneously, very evenly. Only when the driver’s oats sting and the passes tour turns into a hill climb do the upside-down fork and shock absorber wave the white flag. Then there is already a lot of gauscht in the beams, restlessness in the driving behavior. In order to reach this point, however, the throttle valves have to be properly turned on. The fact that the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer remains safely manageable even when the driving dynamics limit is challenged is mainly due to its balanced driving behavior in an inclined position.

At the end of the day, the trio will meet again in the Mediterranean

Just as handy as the MV Agusta Stradale 800, it sticks out on an incline, maintains the targeted course precisely, rolls stable through curves and rubs off the long fearful nipples piece by piece when it comes into contact with the asphalt, spraying sparks late. Only the traction control hinders the committed hustle and bustle a little, as it regulates very early – it feels much too early. Although this increases safety, it slows down driving fun a little. For fans of research locomotion, the rushing acceleration throttle can simply be turned off in an inclined position. Overall, the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer makes a round appearance.

At the end of the day – after numerous pass ascents and descents – the trio meets again for a short rendezvous in the Mediterranean. Touring fan Stefan dreams of the next relaxed forays to interesting destinations on his triumph. Whether Milan, Madrid, London or Lourdes – he already has the map for his travel routes in hand. For him, the journey is the goal. Perceive and experience as much as possible on the go – that is his maxim, the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx makes it possible. Georg sees it quite differently. He drove himself into a corner frenzy throughout the day. And already thinking of passports, passports, passports again. He even put electric blankets on the Stradale so that the grip works from the first meter next time. For him and the MV Agusta Stradale 800, the focus is clearly on the sport factor – but he is happy to take the Italian’s panniers with him for refreshments during short breaks. Snorkeling enthusiast Jens has meanwhile changed clothes for the jump into the cool water. But there is not much time left for the second favorite hobby, after all, the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer will soon be going to the next bay. The way there can be a little longer and brisk. After all, the Yamaha likes travel and speed.

Technical specifications


fact

At 13,890 euros, the MV Agusta Stradale 800 is the most expensive of the three tested fun bikes.

Triumph comments on the TC function


fact

Uli Bonsels, spokesman for Triumph Motorrad Deutschland.

Mr. Bonsels, we could not find any function of the TC of the Tiger in an inclined position. Why?
“The traction control of the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx is configured in such a way that it acts rather cautiously on roads with a good grip level in order to enable experienced drivers to use the machine’s maximum potential. Things are different in the field, in wet conditions or in other conditions that require more careful handling of the throttle. Here the Triumph traction control regulates sensitively and reliably and represents a safety feature that should not be underestimated in more demanding conditions. “

MOTORCYCLE test results


fact

In the end, the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx secured victory in the comparison test of the three-cylinder funbikes.

1. Triumph Tiger 800 XRx
In the everyday standings it is right at the front, and it is also a hard-working point collector: the Triumph Tiger 800 XRx. So she deserves to be at the top of the test trio. The Tiger 800 can do a lot, and a lot of it really, really well.

2. Yamaha MT-09 Tracer
Did everything right and only second? Bargain hunters and friends of the brisk line should still shortlist the Yamaha MT-09 Tracer. Anyone who is willing to forego the great touring suitability à la Triumph will get a fun fun bike for every trip.

3rd MV Agusta Stradale 800
The MV Agusta Stradale 800 stimulates with emotions and calls for active discussion. That turns on, but is not for long trips. A little fine-tuning of the chassis, ergonomics and consumption – and it would be a fiery donor of joy for sporty touring fans.

Related articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *