A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
Markus Jahn

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors

22nd photos

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

1/22
Two power nakeds and two superbikes form a powerful team. Lively romp as a freestyle.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

2/22
Flying around corners in formation. The quartet has plenty of racing genes for the race.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
archive

3/22
Measured values: power on the crankshaft, measurements on Dynojet roller test stand 250.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
jkuenstle.de

4/22
Volkmar Jacob: His number one is clearly the KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
andreasriedmann.at

5/22
Unfortunately, Zonko cannot come. He would have complemented the field wonderfully with his Kawasaki Ninja H2.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
jkuenstle.de

6/22
Tobi Münchinger: For him, the Ducati 1299 Panigale S is the top favorite.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
jkuenstle.de

7/22
Uwe Seitz: He thinks the BMW S 1000 RR is the most powerful of the four, but his number one remains the Yamaha YZF-R1.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
www.factstudio.de

8/22
Jo Bauer: The Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR is at the top of his list.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

9/22
Rod would have loved to ride a Kawasaki Ninja H2R. This is his personal favorite.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

10/22
A couple of tough guys are still splashing in the sea in mid-November.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
www.circuitpaulricard.com

11/22
Well-maintained complex with different route variants. Even an airfield is not missing.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

12/22
“Ce n’est pas un autodrome!” Rants a Frenchman as we wheel over a lonely hilltop for a photo.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

13/22
You don’t hear a characteristic sound like the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR on every corner.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

14/22
Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

15/22
The BMW S 1000 RR can only play its strengths to a limited extent on the tight track.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
BMW

16/22
BMW S 1000 RR.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

17/22
On the brakes, the Ducati 1299 Panigale S is in a class of its own.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
fact

18/22
Ducati 1299 Panigale S..

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

19/22
The wide handlebars and the pleasantly flat knee angle make the KTM 1290 Super Duke R the king of ergonomics.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
jkuenstle.de

20/22
KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

21/22
When the weather is wonderful, we race across the streets and lanes near Toulon in southern France.

A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors
markus-jahn.com

22/22
In rank and file: The four power bolts rarely drove side by side as well as they were for the photo.

Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR, BMW S 1000 RR, Ducati 1299 Panigale S and KTM 1290 Super Duke R.

Dream bikes from the PS editors

Content of

They play in the absolute top league, have won numerous tests and that is not the only reason why they are our personal favorites. A foray with the four dream bikes Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR, BMW S 1000 RR, Ducati 1299 Panigale S and KTM 1290 Super Duke R over country roads and racetracks.

Unusual gentleness on the part of the PS boss in the run-up to Christmas: “Guys, what do you think of it: Everyone grabs their favorite bike, then we jet off to southern France and make the streets and slopes of Le Castellet unsafe. Personal opinions instead of scoring, plus lots of fun and action. ”Incredible looks true to the motto“ What’s wrong with him? ”Or“ That I can still experience it! ”Give way to unbridled joy. “I’ll take the Ducati 1299 Panigale S”, Tobi shouts. “Typical youngster”, stunt driver Jo shakes his head in disbelief. “The main thing is red, stooped and full paneling. Nothing for me, I’m burning upright with the new one A.prilia Tuono V4 1100 RR around the corners and let the wind blow around my nose. “.

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A comparison test of dream bikes from the PS editors

Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR, BMW S 1000 RR, Ducati 1299 Panigale S and KTM 1290 Super Duke R.
Dream bikes from the PS editors

KTM 1290 Super Duke R “, I grin. “Best bike ever!” And Uwe, the boss? “Yamaha YZF-R1. Finally a competitive, sparkling super sports iron from Japan. Too bad that the importer doesn’t have a test machine at the moment. So I put the BMW S 1000 RR in the van for me. A winner. ”It’s a shame that colleague Zonko can’t come with us. He and “his” Kawasaki Ninja H2 would have complemented the field wonderfully. But even so, we form an extremely illustrious group with powerful machines: two power nakeds, two superbikes – three V-engines and a four-in-line. A real PS package. South of France watch out, we’re coming!

The French are crazy

Wonderful weather on the coast: sun, blue sky, 20 degrees. We cruise the streets and lanes near Toulon with pleasure and enjoy the Mediterranean flair. A handful of die-hard people are actually still splashing in the sea in mid-November – the French are crazy! As we wheel elated over a lonely hilltop for the photo, a local threatens with the flics: “Ce n’est pas un autodrome!” He railed with a bright red head. Attempts to appease and explain are pointless, so there are also fun-free small minds here. Since no one feels like having discussions with uniformed men, we move on.

During the stop-and-go through the sometimes busy coastal towns, the rattling V2 of the Ducati 1299 Panigale S is annoying. Nothing goes below 3000 tours, and above this mark the twin rumbles like a continuously firing anti-aircraft gun. “Great!”, Thinks Tobi, but every time he secretly puts ear plugs into his ears. Is that still sound or is it already noise? It all depends on who you ask. With the youngster, the case is clear. Finally, before every trip, he gently strokes the Panigale’s exhaust. Inspired by this ritual, he later pulls the Duc with relish on the rear wheel at 150 km / h on the motorway.

“The posture offers both sport and comfort.”

Meanwhile, Jo declares the sound of the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR, which is also clearly audible, to be the “sharpest thunder on the planet”. That too is of course subjective. But he’s right about one thing: you don’t hear such a characteristic V4 sound on every street corner. The KTM 1290 Super Duke R and the BMW S 1000 RR are much more moderate. At least as long as you are traveling at low speed. If the orange hums still pleasantly sonorous even at higher speeds, the Bavarian roars her heart out from the five-digit range. That sounds conspicuously aggressive and is a further indication that the Munich-based company has left the Biedermeier corner with at least some models.

Over time, Tobi complains of sore wrists. Effeminate youth? No. The very front-heavy, sporty seating position of the Ducati 1299 Panigale S takes its toll. In terms of ergonomics, twitching around at slow speed is not her thing. She loves open terrain and needs speed as the elixir of life. She will have enough opportunity to do this later on the racetrack. There she also shows her tight knees to the full, which she owes to her slim, sexy silhouette. The seating position on the BMW S 1000 RR is a bit more moderate, which Uwe is pleased about: “The posture offers both sport and comfort.” In public hunting grounds, however, the upright seating positions of the naked are unbeatable. The king of ergonomics is the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. With the wide, perfectly cranked handlebars and the pleasantly flat knee angle, it positions its pilot in an absolutely bossy manner. Jo is also happy on the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR, but complains about the high pegs. They force the knees to be at ear level. “With the Tuono, you can tell that it is descended from the superbike RSV4 on every meter. Except for the tight knee angle and the limited wind protection at high speeds, that’s totally ingenious. “

Suddenly we react thinly to criticism

Despite isolated inadequacies, everyone has so far been completely enthusiastic about the choice of their base and defends them down to the knife. Similar to those thin-skinned guys who react rather sniffly to criticism of their favorite bike. Today we do the same, ignore sober objectivity and carve freely and easily through the winding hinterland towards “Circuit Paul Ricard”. Everything’s so colorful here! Broad lines in red and blue meander across the spacious asphalt run-off areas. There is something magical about the play of colors. Unfortunately we cannot go to the main slope with the legendary, eternally long Mistral straight. Accompanied by a dull roar, fat FIA GT boxes rob you over this part of the track today.

But our section also offers the finest terrain for exuberant romp. The KTM 1290 Super Duke R shoots powerfully out of the tight corners and pulls through the rev range without any signs of weakness. Your elastic, cultivated and at the same time powerfully pulsating V2 is undoubtedly one of the most captivating drives on this side of 200 HP. Because of him alone, one likes to overlook many ailments of the Super Duke. She undeniably has it, more on that later. First of all, a look at the power and torque diagram shows the superiority of the 1301 cubic twin. Up to around 8500 rpm it doesn’t give the competition the slightest chance. “Men, get dressed warmly,” I ignite. “You are all victims on your stoves.”.

100-meter drifts: a picture for gods

A clear declaration of war. Jo follows her immediately and gets on the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR. Immediately behind him, it almost knocks me off my stool when I see the estimated 100-meter long drifts with which he brakes the corners completely across. An image for gods. He then shoots out of the curves either with slides or with the front wheel slightly lifted off. Sheer madness! “The tight steering stop is a bit tricky,” explains the enthusiastic Supermoto driver. “If you overdo it while drifting, the bike will throw you off in a high arc.”

Vehicle change. Curiously, I take a seat on the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR. Wow, it angles ultra-direct, laser-accurate and brutally handy. In addition, it reports the track conditions more clearly than almost any other production machine. World class! The KTM 1290 Super Duke R does not offer this kind of transparency by far. For lack of confidence and because of the generally indifferent driving experience, the Super Duke driver loses valuable meters every time he enters the corner. Sudden cross stoppers at the exit of the curve also indicate that the series tires are overstrained. Hypersport rubbers would certainly be good for the Austrian on the race. But even then, it would very likely not come close to the performance of the competitors. “You see,” grins Jo, “a powerful engine is not everything.” “Let’s plant the KTM propellant in the Tuono chassis,” I suggest. “This will be the ultimate weapon.”


markus-jahn.com

In rank and file: The four power bolts rarely drove side by side as well as they were for the photo.

The Ducati 1299 Panigale S comes very close to this ideal on the slopes. As in the KTM 1290 Super Duke R, it also has a huge V2. But because of the engine trimmed for maximum peak performance, the superbike only surpasses the Austrian at the already mentioned 8500 rpm. After all, the performance measurement shows that the Duc has a clear lead over the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR. However, if you weigh in the gear ratio and weight, both Italians are roughly on par when accelerating up to the magical 8500 mark. Only then does the Ducati move away.

“Maybe so,” growls the junior, “but on the brakes the Panigale is in a class of its own.” That’s true. It is true that it bites too hard in the window, especially for the less experienced. But on the race, their stoppers are awesome: crisp, sharp, invincible. It also pricks corners as greedily as the Tuono, and its shock absorber offers high reserves. The semi-active chassis of the Ducati 1299 Panigale S works really well. In contrast, the monoshocks of the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR and the KTM 1290 Super Duke R reach their limits early on. The Austrian could use a little more rebound, the Italian needs more compression damping. In addition, you burn yourself the stylus on the hot exhaust if you want to adjust the rebound of the Aprilia.

Electronics packages leave nothing to be desired

Meanwhile, Uwe is busily doing one lap after the other. “The BMW is great,” he later enthuses. “With her you are really fast on the way after just a few laps. You get used to it in no time, the Bavarian doesn’t know any nasty quirks. ”With one exception: the pressure point of the brake moves further and further towards the handlebars under heavy use. “Once I even pulled the lever to the stop without any significant delay,” assures Jo. The electronic chassis works perfectly on this route. As a reminder: In previous tests, the rear of the BMW S 1000 RR sometimes wedged heavily when accelerating over bumps. No trace of it today. Most likely a consequence of the predominantly flat surface here in Le Castellet.

Nevertheless, the BMW S 1000 RR can only play its strengths to a limited extent on the tight track. When powering out of the tight radii, she goes to work too aggressively in first gear. In the second, on the other hand, she lacks the right speeds for brave sprints. “On the Mistral Straight, I would crush you all,” the boss is certain. “You’re damned lucky today.” But even without this run out, the BMW is competitive. Like the two Italians, she shines with great electronics. Well-coordinated, multi-adjustable traction control, different driving modes, perfect ABS: the three candidates’ electronics packages leave nothing to be desired.

There is no such thing as the perfect bike

“I hate to admit it, but the KTM 1290 Super Duke R’s driving aids could work better,” I remark meekly. This is especially true for the TC, which only offers two positions: on or off. Gradations nil. If it is activated, it nips every power wheelie in the bud. On the other hand, if you force the naked to unicycle dance with the clutch and brute force, there is a risk of rollover. To save your honor, it should be said that this also applies to most other systems. The driver assistants do not (yet) react as quickly. What else bothers you? The KTM electronics do not save the deactivated driving aids. Every time you start the engine you have to zap through the extensive menu and, if necessary, switch off both the traction control and the ABS every time. Anyway, did we mention that? The fabulous engine makes up for everything!

What do we learn from this unusual comparison? There is no such thing as the one perfect bike for every situation and sensation. Making cuts and compromises is the first duty of a sports driver. Ideally, several machines should be parked in the garage. The right one for every purpose and depending on your mood. Which those would be with the PS team is below. There we also let our old buddy Rod have his say. Still on leave, he of course has his own ideas about the perfect bike. Realization unlikely. But one will be allowed to dream one day.

Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR


markus-jahn.com

Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR.

drive

Four-cylinder 65-degree V-engine, four valves / cylinder, 129.0 kW (175 PS) at 11,000 / min *, 121 Nm at 9000 / min *, 1077 cm³, bore / stroke: 81.0 / 52, 3 mm, compression ratio: 13.0: 1, ignition / injection system, 48 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain, traction control

chassis & Brakes

Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 63.0 degrees, caster: 107 mm, wheelbase: 1445 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm, adjustable spring base, rebound and compression level. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Suspension travel front / rear: 111/132 mm, cast light alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 6.00 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/55 ZR 17, first tires: Pirelli Diablo Rosso Corsa, 320 mm Double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers attached radially at the front, 220 mm single disc with two-piston floating caliper at the rear, ABS

performance

  • Max. Rear wheel power **
    120.6 kW (164 PS) at 227 km / h
  • Acceleration**
    0-100 km / h: 3.2 s; 0-150 km / h: 5.3 s; 0-200 km / h: 8.3 s   
  • Draft**
    50-100 km / h: 4.1 s; 100–150 km / h: 3.6 s
  • Top speed *
    255 km / h
  • measurements and weight
    Length / width / height: 2060/920/1210 mm, seat / handlebar height: 825/990 mm, handlebar width: 740 mm, 214 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 49.1 / 50.9%
  • consumption
    Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 9.0 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 18.5 liters, range: 205 km

Set up

  • Setup fork
    stat.neg. Spring travel: 23 mm, compression: 1 K open, rebound: 6 K open, level: 5 turns
  • Setup shock absorber
    stat.neg. Spring travel: 5 mm, compression: 0.25 U open, rebound: 1 K open, level: 143 mm spring length
  • Base price
    16,490 euros (including ancillary costs)

BMW S 1000 RR


markus-jahn.com

BMW S 1000 RR.

drive

Four-cylinder in-line engine, four valves / cylinder, 146 kW (199 PS) at 13,500 / min *, 113 Nm at 10,500 / min *, 999 cm³, bore / stroke: 80.0 / 49.7 mm, compression ratio: 13 , 0: 1, ignition / injection system, 48 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain, traction control

chassis & Brakes

Light alloy bridge frame, steering head angle: 66.5 degrees, caster: 96 mm, wheelbase: 1438 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 46 mm, adjustable in spring base, automatic adjustment of rebound and compression levels. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in the spring base, automatic adjustment of rebound and compression. Suspension travel f / h: 120/120 mm, forged alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 6.00 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 200/55 ZR 17, test tires: Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP, 320 mm Double disc brake with four-piston fixed calipers attached radially at the front, 220 mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear, ABS

performance

  • Max. Rear wheel power **
    142.5 kW (194 hp) at 278 km / h
  • Acceleration**
    0-100 km / h: 3.2 s; 0-150 km / h: 5.0 s; 0-200 km / h: 7.1 s   
  • Draft**
    50-100 km / h: 4.1 s; 100–150 km / h: 3.6 s
  • Top speed * 299 km / h
  • measurements and weight
    Length / width / height: 2080/830/1160 mm, seat / handlebar height: 820/870 mm, handlebar width: 670 mm, 205 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 52.4 / 47.6%
  • consumption
    Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 8.1 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 17.5 liters, range: 216 km

Set up

  • Setup fork
    stat.neg. Spring travel: 25 mm, electrically adjustable. Attenuation: +1, level: standard
  • Setup shock absorber
    stat.neg. Spring travel: 15 mm, electrically adjustable damping, compression: -1, rebound: -1, level: standard
  • Base price
    Basic machine 17,200 euros, test machine 20,065 euros (plus additional costs)

Ducati 1299 Panigale S.


markus-jahn.com

Ducati 1299 Panigale S..

drive

Two-cylinder 90-degree V-engine, four valves / cylinder, 151 kW (205 PS) at 10,500 / min *, 145 Nm at 8750 / min *, 1285 cm³, bore / stroke: 116.0 / 60.8 mm , Compression ratio: 12.6: 1, ignition / injection system, 68 mm throttle valves, hydraulically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain, traction control

chassis & Brakes

Load-bearing motor with light metal subframe, steering head angle: 66.0 degrees, caster: 96 mm, wheelbase: 1437 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm, optional automatic or manual damping setting. Central spring strut with deflection, optionally automatic or manual damping adjustment. Suspension travel front / rear: 120/130 mm, forged light alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 6.00 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 200/55 ZR 17, test tires: Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP, 330 mm Double disc brake with radially attached four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 245 mm single disc with two-piston floating caliper at the rear, ABS

performance

  • Max. Rear wheel power **
    136.5 kW (186 PS) at 247 km / h
  • Acceleration**
    0-100 km / h: 3.2 s; 0-150 km / h: 5.2 s; 0-200 km / h: 7.5 s   
  • Draft**
    50-100 km / h: 4.3 s; 100–150 km / h: 3.8 s
  • Top speed * 299 km / h
  • measurements and weight
    Length / width / height: 2070/820/1130 mm, seat / handlebar height: 825/865 mm, handlebar width: 710 mm, 194 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 53.1 / 46.9%
  • consumption
    Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 8.2 liters / 100 km, tank capacity: 17 liters, range: 207 km

Set up

  • Setup fork
    stat. neg. spring deflection: 33 mm, damping (automatic setting) “hardest”, level: standard
  • Setup shock absorber
    stat. neg. spring deflection: 15 mm, damping (automatic setting) “hardest”, level: standard, deflection: standard (F)
  • Base price
    25,490 euros (plus additional costs)

KTM 1290 Super Duke R.


markus-jahn.com

KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

drive

Two-cylinder 75-degree V-engine, four valves / cylinder, 127 kW (173 PS) at 8870 / min *, 144 Nm at 6500 / min *, 1301 cm³, bore / stroke: 108.0 / 71.0 mm , Compression ratio: 13.2: 1, ignition / injection system, 56 mm throttle valves, hydraulically operated multi-disc oil bath anti-hopping clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain, traction control

chassis & Brakes

Steel tubular space frame, steering head angle: 65.1 degrees, caster: 107 mm, wheelbase: 1482 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 48 mm, adjustable in rebound and compression. Central spring strut without deflection, adjustable in spring base, rebound and compression. Spring travel front / rear: 120/156 mm, cast light alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 6.00 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 190/55 ZR 17, first tires: Dunlop Sportsmart 2, 320 mm double disc brakes with four-piston fixed calipers attached radially at the front, 240 mm single disc with two-piston fixed caliper at the rear, ABS

performance

  • Max. Rear wheel power **
    114.7 kW (156 PS) at 246 km / h
  • Acceleration**
    0-100 km / h: 3.3 s; 0-150 km / h: 5.5 s; 0-200 km / h: 8.9 s   
  • Draft**
    50-100 km / h: 5.5 s; 100–150 km / h: 4.4 s
  • Top speed *
    290 km / h
  • measurements and weight
    Length / width / height: 2140/900/1280 mm, seat / handlebar height: 830/1050 mm, handlebar width: 750 mm, 213 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 49.5 / 50.5%
  • consumption
    Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 7.6 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 18 liters, range: 236 km

Set up

  • Setup fork
    stat.neg. Spring travel: 25 mm (not adjustable), compression: 13 K open, rebound: 16 K open, level: standard
  • Setup shock absorber
    stat.neg. Spring travel: 24 mm, compression level high / low: fully open / 5 K open, rebound: 2 K open, level: standard
  • Base price
    15,795 euros (plus additional costs)

Readings


archive

Measured values: power on the crankshaft, measurements on Dynojet roller test stand 250.

Unmistakable cubic capacity advantage from Ducati and KTM. With 1285 and 1301 cubic meters, power and torque tear everything down at low and medium speeds. Since the Ducati 1299 Panigale S is more geared towards top performance, it has to admit defeat to the KTM 1290 Super Duke R up to around 8500 rpm. From this mark onwards, Ducati power increases noticeably. Thanks to its short gear ratio, the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR remains close on the heels of the V2. Her engine is also a great puncher. And the BMW S 1000 RR? It is always a breathtaking experience how the Bavarian marches in the five-digit range.

Circuit Paul Ricard


www.circuitpaulricard.com

Well-maintained complex with different route variants. Even an airfield is not missing.

For years it was quiet around the “Circuit Paul Ricard” near the southern French town of Le Castellet. Until 1999, motorcycle Grand Prix and the Bol d‘Or for the World Endurance Championship were held on the track in the hinterland of Marseille. After the death of the owner and namesake Ricard (Pastis producer), the community of heirs sold the plant to a trust owned by Formula 1 Zampano Bernie Ecclestone. After extensive renovation work, the facility was closed to the public,
only a few Formula 1 teams used it as a test track. It was not until 2006 that a public racing event took place again with a run for the FIA ​​GT championship. Still no trace of motorcycles. That only changed in 2012 when Stephane Clair, a motorcycle enthusiast managing director, took over the helm.

He brought the Bol d‘Or back to Le Castellet in 2015. Trackdays and free driving are now taking place again, where amateur racers can let off steam. The huge facility looks like a five-star area, is in perfect condition and offers numerous route variants. The offer ranges between around 830 meters and 6.1 kilometers in length. There is also a supermoto track including an off-road section, a kart track, a driving safety center and leisure activities such as a high-rope climbing garden. There is even a burger fryer on site. Outside of racing events, access to the site is free and expressly desired. More information at www.circuitpaulricard.com.

Editor’s favorites


markus-jahn.com

A couple of tough guys are still splashing in the sea in mid-November.

Volkmar Jacob


jkuenstle.de

Volkmar Jacob: KTM 1290 Super Duke R.

My number one is clearly the KTM 1290 Super Duke R. Your 1301 cc V2 is an absolute killer! Since I drove her for the first time at the beginning of last year, I have forgiven the hammer bride for everything. Chassis weaknesses? What chassis weaknesses?

The BMW S 1000 RR came in second with a bit of a stomachache. The fact that the Bavarians built mostly colorless and lame bikes for decades is still part of the brand. The double-R lacks charisma, but it just works like a murderer.

Queen of value for money is the Triumph Street Triple R, my number three. On the country road, your 106 hp, inspiring triplet is completely sufficient. If stronger bikes want to squeeze past the Englishwoman, I would give everything to prevent that.

  1. KTM 1290 Super Duke R.
  2. BMW S 1000 RR
  3. Triuimph Street Triple R

Zonko


andreasriedmann.at

Zonko: Kawasaki Ninja H2.

The grueling supercharged rocket Kawasaki Ninja H2 with the unique look hit me like lightning. I was deeply moved by the fact that Kawasaki was able to deliver a high-flyer with 218 hp according to the horsepower test bench in these times of rage for regulation. It ends up in first place with me.

The expansion of the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR’s displacement paid off in full. The 1100 has become an amazing iron, rank two. Of course, Triumph’s Speed ​​Triple R looks like a relic from a bygone era in modern times. No electronic driving aids, no modes, 135 hp.

But just murderous and pure. Regardless of whether it’s a home track, city or race track, it always showed me the best side of life. Big love and third place!

  1. Kawasaki Ninja H2
  2. Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
  3. Triumph Speed ​​Triple R.

Tobi Münchinger


jkuenstle.de

Tobi Münchinger: Ducati 1299 Panigale S..

Actually, my top favorite, the Ducati 1299 Panigale S, has too much of everything. Starting with the performance to the sex appeal to the volume. But personally, I can never get enough of these things!

The Aprilia Tuono V4 1000 R was really cool (I’ve got one!), But the 1100 is even better. It lands in second place. The pressure comes from below and the engine revs up greedily. You also direct the angry tuna easily into the curves with the wide sail pole.

Third place for the Kawasaki KX 85. You read that correctly, a small motocrosser. I jumped my first backflip with him, it will stick in my memory forever. Driving pleasure does not always depend solely on performance.

  1. Ducati 1299 Panigale S.
  2. Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
  3. Kawasaki KX 85

Uwe Seitz


jkuenstle.de

Uwe Seitz: He thinks the BMW S 1000 RR is powerful, but the Yamaha YZF-R1 remains his number one.

As far as I’m concerned, the BMW S 1000 RR is still the most powerful superbike out of the box. But the Yamaha YZF-R1 just touches me more emotionally and is therefore my absolute number one!

How compact you sit on it, how greedily it drives over the front wheel, the whole design – yeah! The prancing tail when braking hard must be met with strong nerves. For non-athletes, I tend to go for the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR.

Since I’ve been pounding around with it on an extensive tour of the Black Forest, I can feel this greed at the sight and mentally prepare a place for it in the garage. It can’t do city traffic – but it does. The Yamaha YZF-R6 will always have a place in my heart, but only as a racetrack conversion – my three.

  1. Yamaha YZF-R1
  2. Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
  3. Yamaha YZF-R6

Jo Bauer


www.factstudio.de

Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR.

Wide handlebars, great slipper clutch, brilliant feedback: with the Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR I pull drifts all the way to the horizon. Because its V4 also delivers great punch and sounds absolutely awesome, it is at the top of my list.

Another Aprilia lands just behind with the RSV4 RF. Since I recently had a photo shoot with her, I’ve been absolutely thrilled with the Italian’s chassis and electronics. Definitely the first choice for the race. Third place goes to the KTM 1290 Super Duke R..

Those who do not unconditionally fail their engine should urgently have their brain waves checked by a neurologist. On the other hand, I don’t think that’s great that the TC doesn’t offer any adjustment options. It should also provide more feedback at the limit. Before I strike, I’m waiting for a facelift.

  1. Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR
  2. Aprilia RSV4 RF
  3. KTM 1290 Super Duke R.

Rod


markus-jahn.com

Rod: Kawasaki Ninja H2R.

Breathe air instead of riding a moped – really nasty! As soon as I get out of here, I’ll jump on my favorite, the Kawasaki Ninja H2R. Can not Hardly Wait. If it actually delivers 310 hp, it is a real men’s motorcycle.

Heard she smokes tires every second? Perfect! I can still remember the Turbo-Hayabusa that I once tested for the PS guys (issue 9/2014, the editor). The chassis and brakes seem to have been improved in the meantime.

Then she is definitely my number two. Third place has yet to be built. I am thinking of an eight-cylinder biturbo compressor turbine drive. It can be 1000 hp. But I can’t get a cigar like that for driving straight ahead on the salt lake. Who is building? I drive!

  1. Kawasaki Ninja H2R
  2. Suzuki Hayabusa

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