Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

44 photos

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

1/44
When it comes to price-performance ratio, the Kawasaki ZX-10R can convince more.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

2/44
Bye-bye screwed adjustment rings and bloody knuckles, thanks to the hydraulics, the spring can be preloaded without a hook wrench.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

3/44
The Honda’s monoblock pliers, with their Combined ABS, which has been specially designed for the racetrack, grip gently at first, then all the more vehemently.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

4/44
The cockpit looks a little cloudy compared to the Kawasaki.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

5/44
With a full tank, the Honda weighs a mere 212 kg.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

6/44
According to the manufacturer, the top speed of the Honda Fireblade SP is 293 km / h.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

7/44
Honda donated the Fireblade Pirelli Supercorsa SP, racing skins for the road.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

8/44
In return, the developers have adopted the often criticized seating position. The handlebar stubs are now spread further and angled down a little more.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

9/44
The Honda cannot serve with adjustable notches.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

10/44
The five liter consumption of the Honda is very good in these performance regions. But the 5.5 liters of the Kawasaki are still impressive.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

11/44
The four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine of the Honda Fireblade SP.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

12/44
The exhaust of the Honda Fireblade SP.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

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Curve follows curve. Brake, downshift, bend and accelerate again.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

14/44
On the sun-warmed Spanish country roads, on which both fly in parallel.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

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The Fireblade SP is not only beautiful, but thanks to its balance, it is also a great, albeit not really cheap, companion on country roads.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

16/44
The Honda four-cylinder handles the gas application with a noticeable load change jolt. It is therefore worth carefully adjusting the chain tension of the Fireblade.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

17/44
When romping along the country lanes, the Honda scores with its electronically controlled steering damper, which keeps the front much quieter than the conventional Öhlins damper on the Kawasaki, which is equipped with an electromagnetic valve.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

18/44
Honda has made the Öhlins spring elements much tighter. That really feels like a racing machine.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

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For loners. The lighter rear frame of the SP is not approved for a pillion passenger.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

20/44
The rear light of the Honda Fireblade SP.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

21/44
The Honda Fireblade SP.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

22/44
When braking, neither give each other anything.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

23/44
The Kawasaki is a thoroughbred sports file. Precise, curvy, fiery at high speeds. However, engine and transmission settings are also designed for the racetrack.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

24/44
With a full tank, the Kawa weighs 203 kg.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

25/44
With the Kawasaki ZX-10R you can reach top speeds of up to 295 km / h.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

26/44
Soled like this, it can’t be curvy enough for the Greens. It does need a little impulse to turn in, but then it craves a lean angle.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

27/44
Kawasaki puts the tens on Bridgestone S20, test winner in the last tire test.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

28/44
From 6000 rpm the house really comes to life, and from 10,000 rpm the Kawa ZX-10R turns like a prick.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

29/44
Squat, as if ready to jump, the Kawasaki looks next to the Honda with its neat HRC paintwork.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

30/44
Let’s see if the Fireblade can put the Kawa in their place.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

31/44
With the foam braked, both roll out of the village towards the mountains. The ZX-10R makes a growl from its exhaust lobe, the engine is always mechanically present. The Honda purrs more discreetly, runs smoother.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

32/44
Not an easy undertaking. It is true that the Fireblade practically founded the class of light, strong superbikes in 1992 and left its mark on it for a long time. But now other, more modern constructions are setting the tone.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

33/44
The beak of the Kawasaki ZX-10R.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

34/44
The speed bar flashes near the limiter as a switching signal. Not optimal, but better than the dim Honda shift lights.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

35/44
She seems to really feel which lane the pilot wants to choose, and circles exactly on the targeted line towards the exit of the curve.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

36/44
The Kawa literally pulls its driver into the curve on the narrow line, the more sloping, the better.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

37/44
Friends of neutral and curvy suspensions get their money’s worth on the Kawasaki.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

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The rear light of the Kawasaki ZX-10R.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

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The electronically controlled Öhlins steering damper works well, but not as first class as its Honda counterpart.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

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On the kawa you sit lower and with your legs firmly wrapped. This is good for the racetrack, but the pegs can be mounted lower for the country road, which significantly relaxes the knee angle.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

41/44
The suspension of the Kawa ZX-10R.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

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Simple and effective – the notches, which can be mounted in two positions, provide noticeably more comfort on the lower step.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

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In contrast to the Honda, the Kawasaki ZX-10R has both ABS and traction control.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
Jahn

44/44
The freshly redesigned Honda Fireblade in the elegantly equipped SP version in gorgeous HRC paintwork challenges the Kawasaki ZX-10R on the heavenly empty streets in the Spanish hinterland at this time of the year.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

High-performance reactors on country roads and racetracks

The engine and chassis of the Honda Fireblade received an update. The SP variant now has to compete against the Kawasaki ZX-10R in the MOTORRAD comparison test.

E.There is a dreamlike calm. The port of Lloret de Mar is still in hibernation. Few tourists got lost here in the first week of January fleeing winter. Occasionally a delivery truck rumbled along the peaceful promenade. A car of the Policía Municipal strolls by, the crew eyeing with friendly curiosity what is rolling out of the MOTORCYCLE van in the orphaned parking lot under the ice-blue sky.

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Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test
High-performance reactors on country roads and racetracks

Fireblade in the elegantly equipped SP version in a gorgeous HRC finish challenges the Kawasaki ZX-10R on the heavenly empty streets in the Spanish hinterland at this time of the year.

Not an easy undertaking. It is true that the Fireblade practically founded the class of light, strong superbikes in 1992 and left its mark on it for a long time. But now other, more modern constructions are setting the tone. For example the Kawasaki ZX-10R, which competes with the self-confidence of the Superbike World Championship. In addition with various engine mappings, electronically controlled throttle valves, traction control and at least on paper with a significant increase in performance. 200 hp are an announcement.

Fireblade without ride-by-wire and traction control

Ride-by-wire and traction control are also denied to the Honda Fireblade in the current version, but the developers have carefully modified the cylinder head and the exhaust system to refine the power delivery and found three horsepower at the top. With which the Honda now proclaims 181 hp. In addition, the SP version, which rolls to dealers alongside the basic Fireblade, is equipped with Brembo monoblock pliers, sharper ABS and Öhlins suspension elements. It consistently denies a passenger with a light frame rear and solo hump. Then the two burst into silence at the push of a button – with a cheeky 2000 rpm idle. There is no adjustable clutch lever. But the anti-hopping clutches can be pulled easily, whereas those of the Honda Fireblade SP require a little less power. But the first gear of the Honda engages with a powerful blow. Here we go. Let’s see if the Honda Fireblade SP can put the Kawasaki ZX-10R in their place.


Jahn

Let’s see if the Fireblade can put the Kawa in their place.

The pilots are accommodated just as differently as their visual appearance. Both sit close to the handlebars. The kawa pilot, however, deeper, with his legs bent sharply. This is good for the racetrack, but the pegs can be mounted lower for country roads, which significantly relaxes the knee angle. The Honda Fireblade SP cannot serve with adjustable notches. For this, the developers have adopted the often criticized seating position. The handlebar stubs are now spread further and angled down a little more. The notches are ten millimeters further back. The pilot sits noticeably higher than on the kawa. Overall a much more harmonious arrangement than before.

With the foam braked, both roll out of the village towards the mountains. The Kawasaki ZX-10R growls out of its exhaust pipe, the engine is always mechanically present. The Honda Fireblade SP purrs more subtle, runs smoother. With the SP, the pistons are sorted by weight during assembly so that there is a maximum weight difference of one gram per cylinder. This reduces the mechanical load on the crankshaft drive when racing at high speeds and benefits the smoothness of the run.

At low speeds, both of them tense their muscles rather cautiously. But the task is still to slowly bring the engines and tires up to temperature. When it comes to rubbers, both manufacturers have done nothing wrong. Honda donated the Fireblade Pirelli Supercorsa SP, racing skins for the road. They want to be warmed up a bit, but then stick and bend them like a knife. Kawasaki puts the tens on Bridgestone S20, test winner in the last tire test (MOTORRAD 13/2013) thanks to excellent sporty all-round performance. Soled like this, it can’t be curvy enough for the Greens. It does need a little impulse to turn in, but then it craves a lean angle. Literally pulls your driver into the curve on the tight line, the more obliquely, the better. Seems to really feel which lane the pilot wants to choose, and circles exactly on the targeted line towards the exit of the curve. And not least thanks to the fine initial tires, setting up on bumps is not an issue.

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Kawasaki ZX-10R direct and precise

The Kawasaki ZX-10R does not buy this directness and precision with the insubordinate hardness of the Showa suspension elements. Both the Big Piston Fork and the rather flat spring strut, whose pressure stage, which can be adjusted in high and low speed, satisfies the play instinct of setup tinkerers, are quite comfortably designed. Honda has made the Öhlins spring elements much tighter. That really feels like a racing machine. The Swedish dampers are primarily committed to sporty stability, but offer such a wide adjustment range that still leaves enough room for sufficient comfort. In addition, they respond excellently and deal with unevenness in the surface with more meticulousness than those of the Kawasaki. So the Honda Fireblade SP doesn’t bump over the asphalt wrinkles, but pulls its path in a full and stable way without hurting the extended back of the driver at every edge. And even provides a tad more feedback than the green one.

Incidentally, there is no need to fear torn fingers or fiddling with hook wrenches on the TTX shock absorber. Changing the preload is easy thanks to the hydraulics using a socket wrench.

In the hustle and bustle of curves, the Honda Fireblade SP trumps with playful turn-in, swings easily through alternating curves. If you want to dive into deeper lean angles with it, however, it requires a little more pressure on the handlebars and therefore does not circle corners as neutrally as the Kawa, which is ultimately ahead of the curve in terms of precision and willingness to lean.

When romping along the country lanes, the Honda Fireblade SP scores with its electronically controlled steering damper, which keeps the front much quieter than the conventional Öhlins damper of the Kawasaki ZX-10R, which is equipped with an electromagnetic valve. And it pushes itself into pole position with stronger acceleration from corners. Even if she doesn’t keep the Kawa at a distance as clearly as usual in this discipline. A look at the performance diagram reveals why: The torque sink at 4000 rpm has disappeared. The strong starting torque underneath, however, as well. Power and torque now increase more cautiously, so that at 4000 rpm they really jump upwards and clearly noticeably when driving. What the Honda announces acoustically. Suddenly the whispering sound takes on an energetic note. From this mark onwards, it clearly outperforms the ZX-10R in terms of performance. At 6000 rpm, the driver feels the second strong increase in performance, from where the Honda strives towards the limiter with no dips and with noticeable vibrations. The Kawasaki develops its performance much more evenly, but lags behind in terms of performance up to 11,500 rpm.

Transmission, pulling through, handling

The Honda Fireblade SP also benefits from its practical gearbox with shorter lower gears when exiting a curve. While the racing gear of the Kawasaki ZX-10R with long lower and closely spaced upper gears, especially in the lower gears, reduces the pulling power.

But it can turn, then the air burns. Even if it clearly lags behind the factory specification with 189 hp. From 6000 rpm the house really comes to life, and from 10,000 rpm the Kawasaki ZX-10R turns like a stick, while with the Honda Fireblade SP from 11,000 rpm the vigor decreases a little. But don’t be fooled by that, because with 180 hp the Honda is excellent in the forage. However, it should also be mentioned that in 2008 the first Fireblade of the SC 59 type debuted in the test with just as much power with a significantly stronger center. And the first ABS version was three kilograms lighter with a pillion seat. Real progress looks different.

But back to the here and now, on the sun-warmed Spanish country roads, on which both fly in parallel. Curve follows curve. Brake, downshift, bend and accelerate again. The gears of the Kawasaki ZX-10R rest with short distances, but the shift work on the Honda is somewhat bony and softer. The Honda four-cylinder handles the gas application with a noticeable load change jolt. It is therefore worthwhile to carefully adjust the chain tension on the Honda Fireblade SP. This reduces their load change reactions to an acceptable level. However, the Kawasaki does not master the transition from pushing to load operation without any faults or blame. Sometimes the throttle valves open with a minimal delay, annoying at the apex of the curve. Once this moment has been overcome, like the Honda, it depends on the accelerator. Astonishing: Regardless of whether it was calm, engaged or even chased on the racetrack, the Kawasaki was always on the move with water temperatures ten to twelve degrees lower.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

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When braking, neither give each other anything

When braking, neither give each other anything. The monoblock pliers of the Honda Fireblade SP with their Combined ABS, which has been specially designed for the racetrack, grip gently at first, then all the more vehemently. The Tokico stoppers of the Kawasaki do not last as vehemently, but more powerful from the start, increasing braking power linearly. Feedback and controllability are excellent. The Honda is exemplary at the gas pump. Consumption of five liters is very good in these performance regions. But the 5.5 liters of the Kawasaki ZX-10R are still impressive. In general, the Green, whether whipped, good or brisk, approved around ten percent more fuel. In return, she pampers her pilot with goodies such as various mappings that can be operated from the handlebars and traction control. The Honda is much more conservative. Cockpit functions that can be operated from the handlebars: Nothing. Neither ride-by-wire nor traction control are on board.

A hefty mortgage. Otherwise, the fresh cell treatment did not fail to work. The Honda Fireblade SP is not only beautiful, but thanks to its balance, it is also a great, if not really cheap, companion on the country road.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

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Driving on the racetrack


Jahn

At least on production tires and on this track the Honda is at least equal.

Since the Calafat race track is around the corner from our test area, a detour there was the logical next step. The course near Tarragona places high demands on maneuverability and steering precision. For the fast laps we mounted the pegs of the Kawasaki ZX-10R in the upper position, which ensures a significantly narrower knee angle, but also more freedom from leaning. On the rather narrow route, it quickly becomes apparent that the Honda, with its fuller torque curve and the shorter lower gears – these high-performance reactors only get beyond fourth gear on the start-finish straight – has a clear advantage. So you have to try first gear on the Kawasaki one or the other time, where the Honda Fireblade SP pulls out of the corner more fully in second. And when the tens unpacks the hammer with a triumphant howl in the highest speed regions, the braking zone is already approached. On a wider, faster course, she could showcase her motor skills much better.

Speaking of brakes: Both have a slip clutch that keeps the rear wheel quiet during the braking process. The Honda Fireblade SP does this a little better. Their stoppers also grip a little more heavily than those of the Kawa. Especially at the end of the start-finish, where the speedometer shows almost 260 km / h when braking. While the Honda’s load changes were uncomfortably hard at first, this noticeably improved with the chain properly tensioned. Nevertheless, they remained noticeable, as did the somewhat delayed throttle response of the Kawasaki ZX-10R after taxiing phases.

The Honda Fireblade SP can score on the race

In terms of chassis technology, the Honda Fireblade SP can boast. If the Kawasaki ZX-10R was popular on the country road with its precision and greediness for curves, now the Honda scores. She can be driven more nimbly through the rear section of the route, which is full of chicanes. The quick flipping from left to right is noticeably easier for her. In addition, the tightly coordinated spring elements ensure a good road holding. The fork dealt with hard braking maneuvers with ease, and the shock absorber largely keeps the rear of the car steady, even in heavy acceleration phases. The suspension elements of the Kawasaki do not do their job bad either, but in total they do not come close to the shock absorbers of the Honda. With a noticeable movement in the hindquarters, the Kawasaki sweeps onto the home straight, where it accelerates fully when it is turned down, while the Honda masters this passage calmly.

The Kawasaki ZX-10R also clearly twitches the handlebars there. However, the Honda Fireblade SP also benefits from its tires here. The Pirelli Supercorsa SP can almost be seen as real racing skins and deliver significantly more stability and grip than the otherwise excellent Bridgestones of the Kawa when racing is stressed. With her, especially in the long right-hand curve after the home straight, through which she accelerates fully, the traction control prevents slips early on, while the Honda offers significantly more grip here, but the pilot is on his own in the event of a slide.

On the country road, the lack of this little helper may be bearable. On the racetrack, however, it should be on board in view of 180 hp and Honda should finally give up its blockade attitude in this regard.

Honda Fireblade SP and Kawasaki ZX-10R in the test

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Data and measured values ​​Honda Fireblade SP


Jahn

According to the manufacturer, the top speed of the Honda Fireblade SP is 293 km / h.

engine

design type
Four-cylinder four-stroke-
In-line engine
injection Ø 46 mm
coupling
Multi-disc oil bath clutch
(Anti-hopping)
Bore x stroke  76.0 x 55.1 mm
Displacement 1000 cc
compression 12.3: 1
power
133.0 kW (181 hp)
at 12,000 rpm
Torque 114 Nm at 10,500 rpm

landing gear

frame
Bridge frame
aluminum
fork
Upside-down fork,
Ø 43 mm
Steering damper electro-hydraulic
Brakes front / rear  Ø 320/220 mm
Assistance systems SECTION
bikes 3.50 x 17; 6.00 x 17
tires 120/70 ZR 17; 190/50 ZR 17
Tires Pirelli Supercorsa SP

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mass and weight

wheelbase 1410 mm
Steering head angle 66.7 degrees
trailing 96 mm
Front / rear suspension travel 120/138 mm
Seat height ** 820 mm
Weight with full tank ** 212 kg
Payload ** 108 kg
Tank capacity / reserve 17.7 / 4.0 liters
Service intervals 6000 km
price 18290 euros
Price test motorcycle 18290 euros
Additional costs 295 euros
** MOTORCYCLE measurements; 2ABS (1000 euros)

MOTORCYCLE readings

Top speed *  293 km / h
acceleration
0-100 km / h
0-140 km / h
0-200 km / h 
3.2 sec
4.6 sec
7.4 sec
Draft
60-100 km / h
100-140 km / h
140-180 km / h 
4.0 sec
3.3 sec
3.3 sec
Consumption highway 5.0 liters
Reach country road 354 km
* Manufacturer information

Data and measured values ​​Kawasaki ZX-10R


Jahn

With the Kawasaki ZX-10R you can reach top speeds of up to 295 km / h.

engine

design type

Four-cylinder four-stroke-
In-line engine
injection
Ø 47 mm
coupling

Multi-disc oil bath clutch
(Anti-hopping)
Bore x stroke 
76.0 x 55.0 mm
Displacement
998 cc
compression
13.0: 1
power

147.0 kW (200 hp)
at 13,000 rpm
Torque
112 Nm at 11,500 rpm

landing gear

frame

Bridge frame
aluminum
fork

Upside-down fork,
Ø 43 mm
Steering damper
electro-hydraulic
Brakes front / rear 
Ø 310/220 mm
Assistance systems
ABS, traction control
bikes
3.50 x 17; 6.00 x 17
tires
120/70 ZR 17; 190/55 ZR 17
Tires
Bridgestone BT 016, rear “CC”

mass and weight

wheelbase
1425 mm
Steering head angle
65.0 degrees
trailing
107 mm
Front / rear suspension travel
120/125 mm
Seat height **
810 mm
Weight with full tank **
203 kg
Payload **
178 kg
Tank capacity / reserve
17.0 / – liters
Service intervals
6000 km
price
15,695 euros
Price test motorcycle
16 695 Euro²
Additional costs
170 euros
** MOTORCYCLE measurements; 2ABS (1000 euros);
²ABS (1000 euros)

MOTORCYCLE readings

Top speed * 
295 km / h
acceleration
0-100 km / h
0-140 km / h
0-200 km / h
3.4 sec
4.7 sec
7.4 sec
Draft
60-100 km / h
100-140 km / h
140-180 km / h
4.0 sec
3.6 sec
3.7 sec
Consumption highway
5.5 liters
Reach country road
309 km
* Manufacturer information

Performance measurement, scoring, conclusion


Jahn

When it comes to price-performance ratio, the Kawasaki ZX-10R can convince more.

Performance measurement


BILLION

The performance measurement of the Honda Fireblade SP and the Kawasaki ZX-10R.

The strong starting torque of the previous Fireblade model has disappeared. Instead, the torque leaps up sharply at 4000 rpm and again at 6000 rpm. From 10,000 rpm, the revised Honda Fireblade puts a lot on it. The performance curve of the Kawasaki ZX-10R remains below the Honda curve almost over the entire rev range. From 11,500 rpm, the image turns around impressively. Perhaps an advantage on the racetrack, but not on the country road, especially with the racing gearbox.

Pulling 50 to 150 km / h

  Honda
Fireblade SP 
Kawasaki
ZX-10R
2nd gear  6.9 sec 7.3 sec
3rd gear 8.9 sec 9.6 sec

Scoring

engine

Maximum
score 
Honda
Fireblade SP 
Kawasaki
ZX-10R
Draft 40 35 33
acceleration 40 37 36
Top speed 30th 30th 30th
Engine characteristics  30th 26th 24
Responsiveness 20th 12th 11
Load change 20th 13 14th
Smoothness 20th 13 14th
coupling 10 9 8th
circuit 20th 14th 13
Gear ratio 10 9 8th
Start 10 8th 9
total 250 206 200

Even if the Honda Fireblade SP cannot keep the Kawasaki ZX-10R at a distance as clearly as before in the pull-through test, its engine is still the more powerful. Flanked by a practical, stepped and softer gearbox. In terms of load changes and smoothness, the Kawa engine is a bit more polished.

landing gear

Maximum
score 
Honda
Fireblade SP 
Kawasaki
ZX-10R
Handiness 40 26th 25th
Stability in turns 40 37 37
Steering behavior 40 32 34
feedback 10 9 8th
Inclined position 20th 20th 20th
Straight-line stability 20th 20th 19th
Suspension tuning in front  20th 18th 17th
Chassis set-up at the rear  20th 18th 17th
Adjustment options undercarriage  10 7th 6th
Suspension comfort 10 4th 4th
Driving behavior with a passenger 20th 0 8th
total
250
191
195

The Honda Fireblade SP is the somewhat more willing partner in fast changing bends, and it also turns in more easily. But the Kawasaki ZX-10R pleases with enormous line fidelity and greater neutrality. From a sporting point of view, the suspension elements of the Honda are perfectly matched and are also more sensitive. Nevertheless, both offer a sufficient level of comfort.


Jahn

Soled like this, it can’t be curvy enough for the Greens. It does need a little impulse to turn in, but then it craves a lean angle.

everyday life

Maximum
score 
Honda
Fireblade SP 
Kawasaki
ZX-10R
Ergonomics driver 40 21st 21st
Ergonomics pillion 20th 0 4th
Windbreak 20th 8th 6th
view 20th 12th 12th
light 20th 15th 17th
Furnishing 30th 13 22nd
Handling / maintenance 30th 16 17th
Luggage storage 10 0 0
Payload 10 4th 4th
Range 30th 22nd 18th
processing 20th 17th 16
total
250
128
137

The revised seating position of the Honda Fireblade now looks much more consistent than before. The new windshield, which is curved further up, also provides a little more wind protection. But with various mappings that can be selected from the handlebars and traction control, the Kawasaki ZX-10R is much more contemporary.

security

Maximum
score 
Honda
Fireblade SP 
Kawasaki
ZX-10R
Braking effect 40 33 31
Brake metering 30th 24 26th
Braking with a passenger / fading 20th 0 8th
Righting moment when braking  10 6th 7th
ABS function 20th 18th 15th
Handlebar slapping 20th 19th 16
Ground clearance 10 6th 7th
total
150
106
110

The ABS of the Honda Fireblade is more closely coordinated with the know-how of the IDM races. The stoppers of the Kawasaki ZX-10R don’t grip as hard, but thanks to the linear effect and more feedback, they can be dosed better. Still unbeatable: the electronically controlled steering damper from the Honda.


Jahn

Honda donated the Fireblade Pirelli Supercorsa SP, racing skins for the road.

costs

Maximum
score 
Honda
Fireblade SP 
Kawasaki
ZX-10R
guarantee 30th 15th 15th
Consumption (country road)  30th 19th 17th
Inspection costs 20th 9 11
Maintenance costs 20th 5 4th
total
100
48
47

Even more than the Kawasaki ZX-10R, the Honda Fireblade SP skimpy on fuel, but it puts a greater strain on your wallet during inspections.

Conclusion

Maximum
score 
Honda
Fireblade SP 
Kawasaki
ZX-10R
Overall rating 1000 679 689
Price-performance note  
1.0 3.4 2.5

Well equipped, great chassis, makes a decent grade for the Kawasaki ZX-10R. Its solid price makes the Honda Fireblade SP almost a case for enthusiasts.

Honda Fireblade SP
Great suspension elements, fine handling, racing-like revised ABS and better ergonomics. The Fireblade has grown again, especially as an SP. The lack of electronic helpers such as traction control is all the more painful in view of the price. In the property evaluations, it has the edge.

Kawasaki ZX-10R
It is a thoroughbred sports file. Precise, curvy, fiery at high speeds. However, engine and transmission settings are also designed for the racetrack. Since, in contrast to the Honda two-seater, the comparison would be a point rating
result in a distorted picture, which is why the placements are omitted.

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