Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison

14th photos

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

1/14
Two middle class naked bikes in the verifying test. In the end, who is ahead of the game – the Kawasaki ER-6n or the powerful single-cylinder bike from KTM, the 690 Duke?

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

2/14
Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

3/14
KTM 690 Duke.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

4/14
KTM 690 Duke.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

5/14
The very smooth clutch is easy to dose, especially for beginners.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

6/14
The rustic cockpit of the KTM even has a gear indicator.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

7/14
The Duke’s suspension strut is supported by a deflection on the swing arm.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

8/14
Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

9/14
Kawasaki ER-6n.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

10/14
Kawasaki ER-6n.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

11/14
The white tachometer is actually superfluous, because the 649 cm³ twin of the ER-6n delivers its power homogeneously and uniformly.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

12/14
The Kawasaki offers a solid pillion seat.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

13/14
The side-mounted shock absorber can handle the sporty gait in solo operation.

Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke in comparison
jkuenstle.de

14/14
In the end, the KTM 690 Duke wins the comparison test – it is fascinating and really fun.

Mid-range motorcycles from Kawasaki and KTM

Comparison test: Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke

Content of

Middle-class motorcycles are often smiled at and labeled as fun-free normals. Wrongly, as the Kawasaki ER-6n and KTM 690 Duke prove.

The arena for these totally normal mid-range motorcycles is defined. The circuit does not have a sonorous name like “Circuit de Ledenon” or “Autodromo Campo di Fuego”. No, the route goes from Vallon-Pont-d’Arc on the winding D 290 along the Gorges de l’Ardèche to the junction to Bidon – and into the village. From there on the D 201 to the crossroads on the fast D 4, waiting with fast curves, which leads us back to Vallon-Pont-d’Arc in no time at all. This route stands for exactly one thing: Burning like God in France. And that in one of the most beautiful areas in the world. Tester heart, what more could you want?

On these winding, sometimes very narrow streets, nobody needs more than the 70 hp of the Kawasaki ER-6n and the KTM 690 Duke. Playful handling, precise chassis and lush ground clearance are much more popular here than three-digit horsepower and traction control. After all, shooting on the French asphalt strips should be unclouded fun and not make the sweat of fear pour out.

So it is hardly surprising that in the third turn on our test track we eat two French local heroes and they later nod to us at the café, visibly impressed. Well, boys, there is a lot of fun potential in the ordeal bread and butter ovens called ER-6n and 690 Duke.

But stop! The KTM 690 Duke a bread and butter motorcycle? Well, in a way, because KTM set other priorities with the revision of the Duke. Got the Duke out of the corner of the uncompromising, well-styled eccentric and threw him with polished manners, an attractive price and an appealing look right into the field of affordable naked bikes. And that’s where it belongs despite, or perhaps because of, its single-cylinder engine. Since the revision of the stew, which now works with real 690 cubic meters and is fueled by an ultra-modern ride-by-wire system, the Duke chassis has been in vain sunshine. Of course, the single can’t run as smoothly as a perfectly balanced V-Zwei, but for a single-piston engine of this size, thanks to the balancer shaft, it is a poem. Its comfort zone begins at just under 3000 rpm, and the single pushes it hard and predictably. At 5500 rpm it is really fun, pulling up to 7500 tours like a bull. It even burns off its fireworks convincingly in the large corridors. Its very easy-to-use and easy-to-dose clutch makes starting easy, but unfortunately the gearbox, which is otherwise easy to shift, did not always slip perfectly. Especially when changing gears from third to fourth, the gears often did not lock properly in the test duke.

Despite this small flaw, the Kawasaki ER-6n has a hard time following the KTM storming up and away. Your parallel twin provides the same top performance, but in a much less spectacular way – and also has to accelerate 45 kilograms (Kawa 208 kg, KTM 163 kg ready to drive!) More. After engaging the clutch, the twin pushes forward stoically but never surprisingly – only the changing acoustics testify to the current speed level. What a novice driver would like very much – he is never surprised by the engine, bores the experienced driver. Since the twin does not particularly increase its power anywhere, it almost doesn’t seem to matter in which speed range it operates. Which is a shame, because subjectively, dynamism and, of course, driving pleasure are lost. To achieve this, the gearbox that has to be operated with increased force has to be operated less.

If the Duke driver pulls hard on the agitator on the winding streets of our test area, the Kawa will find it difficult to follow. Out of tight corners, the KTM is simply a force, pulls out its arms, lifts the front wheel and seems to be in its element. The Kawa, on the other hand, revs up like a sewing machine, never tears and thus requires a different driving style. Only when the gas is unfolded very early in a deep lean position – the soft response of the twin also allows this, the gap to the KTM can be kept within limits. But the narrower the road gets and the more curves there are, the further the KTM pulls away. At the later refueling stop, it is hardly surprising that the Kawasaki is the thirstier of the two: After all, the brave twin has to fire almost a hundredweight more through the course than the Austrian.

The two engine characters reflect the different approaches of the manufacturers to their respective motorcycle. KTM domesticated a piece of sports equipment, and Kawasaki gave a plain-looking motorcycle a more dynamic look and a crisper chassis set-up. This is also confirmed in the driving behavior. While the Duke can also be slow, but wants to be fast, the Kawa is the other way around. The ER-6n exudes something like solid aplomb. If you take a seat on it, the first thing you notice is the rather tightly tuned chassis. Then the handlebars, which are still strangely cranked, but which you get used to quickly. When braking into corners, the brakes can be well dosed, their bite is not sporty and aggressive, but rather efficient. In case of doubt, the ABS helps, for example if the fork hits a block during a very violent braking attack on a bump in the ground. When the handlebars are pressed, the Kawasaki leans quickly, but not lively, into an inclined position and stays true to its line. Unspectacular and calm, she carries her chauffeur to the exit of the curve and spits him onto the next straight. Rapid changes of direction, however, cost strength and must be initiated with crisp steering impulses.


jkuenstle.de

Kawasaki ER-6n.

This is of course very different on the feather-light KTM. Its wide handlebars, agile Michelin tires and lower rotating masses let you whiz through the curves like a one. Playfully she fires from left to right and back again. You can take the Duke into cornering frenzy for hours, only when you feel dizzy does it slow you down again. A small flaw tarnishes the well-kept distillery on the Duke. The single disc brake on the front wheel twists the fork slightly when it is anchored hard. That makes it a little more difficult to keep the Herzog on course in front of or in the control range of the Bosch ABS. But sometimes halfway. Because if you drive so sportily that you often come into this area, you will quickly get used to this peculiarity.

But what every pilot can get used to and what he can look forward to is the freedom from banking of the two middle graders. In the past, motorcycles in this category almost touched down when turning in the 30s zone, nowadays you tend to drag your toes bloody rather than touching a footrest.

Speaking of seating: a lot has happened on the Duke in terms of seating comfort. While KTM used to sell seat boards to customers as a “sporty” workplace, the 690 Duke can confidently be called a sofa. The sitting position behind the wide handlebars is ideal for strolling and burning, the upholstery is comfortable and bearable even on long journeys. The only pity is that the pilot is sitting on the molded cushion as if nailed to the ground. He has more space to play on the Kawasaki and can slide back and forth a little. However, the knee angle is quite narrow here. What initially feels sporty, depending on the length of the leg, becomes uncomfortable in the long run.

The distillery on the Gorges de l’Ardèche is coming to an end. What remains is a big grin and the realization that “normal” motorcycles like the Kawasaki ER-6n and the KTM 690 Duke are real entry-level drugs into the world of cornering frenzy.

PS rating / judgment


jkuenstle.de

KTM 690 Duke.

 Max. Points

 Kawasaki

 KTM drive  100  61  65 landing gear  100  81  80 Everyday life and driving fun  50  27  31 Total  250  169  176 placement    2.  1.

PS judgment

1st KTM 690 Duke
The Austrian wins this test because she is fascinating and really fun. She can be a bit of a cuddly cat, but rather loves sports. So handy and powerful it is an excellent iron for small streets.

2. Kawasaki ER-6n
It is clearly the better entry-level motorcycle because it is never overwhelmed. However, you will be very
tame character but also quickly boring. Sporty filing is more exhausting with her.

Technical specifications


jkuenstle.de

In the end, the KTM 690 Duke wins the comparison test – it is fascinating and really fun.

Kawasaki ER-6n

drive 
Two-cylinder in-line engine, 4 valves / cylinder, 53 kW (72 PS) at 8500 / min *, 64 Nm at 7000 / min *, 649 cm³, bore / stroke: 83.0 / 60.0 mm, compression ratio: 10.8 : 1, ignition / injection system, 38 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain

landing gear 
Tubular steel bridge frame, steering head angle: 65.0 degrees, caster: 110 mm, wheelbase: 1410 mm, telescopic fork, inner fork tube diameter: 41 mm, not adjustable. Side mono spring strut without deflection, adjustable in the spring base. Suspension travel front / rear: 125/130 mm

Wheels and brakes 
Light alloy cast wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 4.50 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 160/60 ZR 17, first tires: Dunlop Roadsmart II “J”, 300 mm double disc brakes with two-piston floating calipers at the front, 220 -mm single disc with single-piston floating caliper at the rear, ABS

measurements and weight 
Length / width / height: 2140/850/1280 mm *, seat / handlebar height: 790/1030 mm, handlebar width: 655 mm, 208 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 49.1 / 50.9%

Rear wheel power in last gear 
49 kW (67 PS) at 176 km / h

consumption 
Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 6.2 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 16.0 liters, range: 258 km

Base price 
6,995 euros (plus additional costs)

KTM 690 Duke

drive 
Single-cylinder four-stroke engine, 4 valves / cylinder, 51.5 kW (70 PS) at 7500 / min *, 70 Nm at 5500 / min *, 690 cm³, bore / stroke: 102.0 / 84.5 mm, compression ratio : 12.6: 1, ignition / injection system, 46 mm throttle valves, mechanically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, G-Kat, chain

landing gear 
Steel tubular space frame, steering head angle: 63.5 degrees, caster: 115 mm, wheelbase: 1466 mm, upside-down fork, Ø fork inner tube: 43 mm, not adjustable. Central spring strut with deflection, adjustable in the spring base. Suspension travel front / rear: 135/135 mm

Wheels and brakes 
Cast light alloy wheels, 3.50 x 17 / 5.00 x 17, front tires: 120/70 ZR 17, rear: 160/60 ZR 17, initial tires: Michelin Pilot Power, 320 mm single disc brakes with four-piston fixed calipers at the front, 240 mm single discs with single-piston floating caliper at the rear, ABS

measurements and weight 
Length / width / height: 2130/900/1340 mm *, seat / handlebar height: 830/1100 mm, handlebar width: 775 mm, 163 kg fully fueled, v./h .: 49.5 / 50.5%

Rear wheel power in last gear 
48.5 kW (66 PS) at 173 km / h

consumption 
Fuel type: Super unleaded. Average test consumption: 5.4 liters / 100 km, tank capacity 14.0 liters, range: 259 km

Base price 
7495 euros (plus additional costs)

Related articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *