Middle class comparison test

Table of contents

Middle class comparison test
fact

motorcycles

Middle class comparison test

Middle class comparison test
Just turn blue

The sun is shining, the early autumn beckons: away with pencil or tool, off to the countryside. On two wheels, of course. Making blue is very easy? this is shown by the manufacturers’ grip on the color shelf. It is more difficult to decide which all-round bike it should be.

Stefan Kaschel

10/22/2003

Sometimes everything has to happen very quickly. The view out of the office window, the decision to sign off with the boss. Get on your motorcycle and enjoy the summer again, even if it’s already autumn.
Good for those who can then ascend directly. Because he drives to work on two wheels. Just like for shopping. Or to the doctor’s appointment and even to the pub in the evening. Always has his motorcycle on his man (or woman).
There are these bikes that are always there, always ready. Not too expensive
in maintenance, not too big, not too un-
comfortable, but fun in every situation. And that’s why it’s so popular. Like Suzuki’s GSF 600 S Bandit and SV 650 S, like that Kawasaki ZR-7S. Or Yamaha’s FZ6 Fazer, recently reissued.
Yes, there is a breath of fresh air in the middle class ?? partially at least. Because while bandit and ZR-7S The SV 650 S and Fazer are still old-fashioned, with a classic, wind-cooled row quad and tubular steel frame. Water cooling, injection, aluminum-
Bridge frame ?? everything is there that the specialists from the sports department propose-
Life. The question is: Is that necessary in normal motorcycle life apart from the superlatives?
Part of the answer is delivered immediately, on the way out of the city and into the countryside. While Bandit and ZR-7S only have with it due to lack of injection and corresponding electronics-
SV 650 S are the ones who survive the warm-up phase by fiddling with chokes
and Fazer fully involved from the first turn of the crankshaft. and
without the jubilation of past injection generations. Run smoothly, take on the gas cleanly, as we have known from the automotive sector for years. Who would seriously go there today
accept the choke acrobatics from the Golf I? No human.
So one to zero for progress. Especially with these all-rounders who occasionally have to be used for the short drive to the bakery. But we were on the way to the countryside. And stay with the engine. Four cylinders in line or V2
One question is, more or less displacement is the second, modern or old construction is the third. The answer to all three questions: SV 650. Because this drive is for almost everything in the engine-
cycling life fits. Pulls
deep out of the rev cellar, where Bandit and Fazer weaken considerably and only the larger capacity Kawa engine is superior. And the Suzuki two-cylinder is convincing, despite a little breathing space, even in the medium speed range, outstripping even the 94 cubic centimeter in size from the 6500 mark-
ren ZR-7 four-cylinder, only to let it be good beyond the 9000 mark.
That is enough for measured 76 PS and a maximum torque of 65 Newton meters. This value is at 7200 rpm. And is also the highest in the comparison field.
And the Fazer? Is it considerably stronger with 100 hp? but only beyond 9000 / min. From around 8500 tours, the sports engine takes another breath and marches as hard as it can. If need be, up to 13,000 rpm. That beguiles, that makes you happy? basically comes
however a little late. Because
the Fazer driver is then already in second gear in speed regions-
that are dealt with in traffic law. She can stroll
SV 650 clearly better. But we recommend to all those who like to take it easy: Please sit up, because the FZ6 engine conveys a pure racetrack feeling despite its changed characteristics compared to the R6.
The four-cylinder ZR-7S and the Bandit are miles away from that. The Kawa’s double-cam engine with its wildly jagged cylinder head makes no secret of the fact that its origins go back to the last millennium, when calm was still a virtue. Draws a nice, even performance curve on the dyno roller, with a
lush torque hump up to 8000 rpm. But that was it, then it goes downhill, while the performance peak is only at 9400 rpm. If you want to talk about the summit, measured 71 hp are really not the world for a three-quarter liter displacement. Even the little one has
air / oil-
Cooled unit to offer the Bandit more, which holds up to 9000 / min due respect distance to the Kawasaki engine, but above that there is still room for
has a final spurt and mobilizes at least 79 hp at 10700 rpm. This means that the 600 four-cylinder even surpasses the SV sister by three hp.
Nevertheless, the 600 bandit seems constantly strained in this test field and has to be turned to stay tuned. In contrast to the Fazer, it struggles with a power and torque deficit in the lower and medium speed range and with a few pounds too much. 230 kilograms full of fuel, that’s only possible from the Kawa-
saki (236 kilograms) topped. The active athletes SV 650 S and Fazer weigh only 196 and 209 kilograms, respectively. Values ​​that clearly have an impact in the sprint and pull-through disciplines (see measured values ​​on the right-hand side) and thus allow the chapter on driving dynamics to be addressed to the young.
It is not only in this regard that modern technology is usually not a curse, but a blessing. Best
Example: the new 600 Fazer, whose
cast, consist of two halves-
the aluminum bridge frame including the chassis components is a prime example of stability and even surpasses the chassis of the SV with truss frame. The conventional double loops made of tubular steel of the Bandit and the ZR-7S counteract the forces that occur while driving much more indecisively. Even more: In combination with much softer suspension elements, there is a lack of direct feedback to the driver, such as the SV 650 and FZ6 Fazer deliver and which, in addition to driving safety, also increases the entertainment value. To compensate for this, the fat Kawa with its neutral cornering behavior in road construction capers of the worst kind at least gives the feeling of being a captain on board and chugging calmly through heavy seas. The 600 bandit reaches the limits of the shock absorber on a bad route, especially of the shock absorber, and stumbles like an ordinary seaman after extensive shore leave.
No, that was not what going blue was meant to be. So slow down, drop anchor. Has in this regard Yamaha retrofitted, the new Fazer only has class instead of the previous excellent one-piece four-piston calipers-
common double piston stoppers. And is promptly surpassed by the SV 650 S in terms of dosage. The fact that both of them decelerate significantly better than Bandit and even more ZR-7S is due to the friction pairing of discs and pads, while the significant momentum of the Fazer and Bandit when braking is due to the tire contour ?? here Dunlop’s brand new D 252, there Bridgestone’s aged BT 56 ?? goes. SV 650 S and ZR-7S anyway
are less capricious in this regard, despite the front tires, which are also 120 millimeters wide.
That’s what the S model is for
SV 650 com in another respect-
without a promise. And that is with the sitting position. Len clamped under the fork bridge-
kerhalften are known from established athletes? and that’s exactly how it feels
on. A stooped, front-wheel-oriented posture is good for the hunt for fast lap times, it still works on the autobahn or on fast, flowing country roads. When turning blue in the green, on the other hand, when the curves are tighter and the asphalt surface is getting worse, it is clearly too much of a good thing. In such areas, the new Fazer shows in an exemplary manner how it should be. Upright and still gathered, with enough space for all limbs and a good windbreak behind the high and wide window? the Yamaha is better equipped for such stretches. That is true ?? with drawbacks? also for ZR-7S and Bandit S. On them is
you can also be comfortably accommodated, but much more passively, while passengers feel a little better on the gently sloping benches-
upscale than on the Fazer. The Suzuki SV 650 S shoots the bird at this point. The two-part bench already signals that it is more of a makeshift solution than a serious offer, the high footrests do the rest, and passengers do
spoiling a small, spontaneous afternoon excursion.
That’s a shame, because the SV-Suzuki would definitely have the chassis to the passenger. Just like the Yamaha, whose directly hinged shock absorber without the Pro-
gression has to get by with a deflection, but fully pre-tensioned, it certainly suffices for higher demands. The Kawasaki can keep up here. In contrast, the bandit continues what is going on-
Already solo indicated: The reserves of the shock absorber are insufficient in terms of both the spring rate and the damping under double loads.
This is bearable on a short trip, but not on an extended holiday tour with a passenger and luggage. Of all things, the old, carburettor-equipped Bandit with 4.6 liters per 100 kilometers shows that this form of mixture preparation can keep pace with injection systems, at least in terms of fuel consumption. The ZR-7S
However, with 5.4 liters on the country road, you can take a good sip from the fuel barrel. But that will soon end anyway. Firstly, because with the Z 750 this class is being newly filled at Kawasaki. And secondly, because the ZR-7S does not meet the Euro-2 requirements and after June 30, 2004 may no longer be re-registered.
So if you want another one, you should hurry up. Those interested in the aging GSF 600 S Bandit, however, do not need each other
to hurry. Successful as it is
Suzuki heave the bandit over the Euro 2 hurdle. Even if you have a much more modern motorcycle at your side with the SV 650. And with the Yamaha FZ6 Fazer, a new test winner across the board.

Buy complete article

Middle class comparison test

Middle class comparison test
Just turn blue

10 pages) as PDF

€ 2.00

Buy now

Technical data: Kawasaki ZR-7S

Air-cooled four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine, two overhead, chain-driven camshafts, two valves per cylinder, bucket tappets, wet sump lubrication, constant pressure carburetor, Ø 32 mm, transistor ignition, secondary air system, electric starter, 308 W alternator, 12 V / 10 Ah battery x stroke 66 x 54 mm, displacement 739 cm3, rated output 56 kW (76 hp) at 9500 rpm, max. Torque 63 Nm (6.4 kpm) at 7500 rpm Pollutant values ​​(homologation) CO 7.81 g / km, HC 1.59 g / km, NOx 0.13 g / km Power transmission Mechanically operated multi-plate oil bath clutch, five-speed gearbox, O- Double loop frame made of tubular steel, telescopic fork, stanchion diameter 41 mm, two-arm swing arm made of aluminum profiles, central spring strut with lever system, adjustable spring base and rebound damping, double disc brake at the front, floating brake discs, Ø 300 mm, double-piston calipers, double-piston disc brake at the rear, Ø 240 mm .Tire 120/70 ZR 17; 160/60 ZR 17 tires tested Bridgestone BT 020 FJ / R chassis data Wheelbase 1455 mm, steering head angle 64.5 degrees, caster 93 mm, spring travel f / h 130/130 mm. Dimensions and weights Seat height * 800 mm, weight with a full tank * 236 kg, payload * 180 kg, tank capacity / reserve 22/3 liters.Warranty two years with unlimited mileage.Colors red, blue, silver.Performance variant 25 kW (34 PS) Price 6495 euros, additional costs 105 euros

Technical data: Suzuki GSF 600 S Bandit

Air / oil-cooled four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine, two overhead, chain-driven camshafts, four valves per cylinder, fork rocker arms, wet sump lubrication, constant pressure carburetor, Ø 32 mm, transistor ignition, secondary air system, electric starter. Bore x stroke 62.6 x 48.7 mm displacement 600 cm3 Rated output 57 kW (77 hp) at 10500 rpm Max. Torque 54 Nm (5.5 kpm) at 9500 rpm Pollutant values ​​(homologation) CO 7.18 g / km, HC 1.65 g / km, NOx 0.14 g / km Power transmission Mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, O-ring Chassis Double loop frame made of tubular steel, telescopic fork, stanchion diameter 41 mm, two-arm swing arm made of steel profiles, central spring strut with lever system, adjustable spring base and rebound damping, double disc brake at the front, floating brake discs, Ø 290 mm, double-piston calipers, disc brake at the rear, Ø 240 mm, two-piston caliper. 60 ZR 17; 160/60 ZR 17 tires tested Bridgestone BT 56 F / R chassis data Wheelbase 1433 mm, steering head angle 64.5 degrees, caster 100 mm, spring travel f / h 130/121 mm. Dimensions and weights Seat height * 800 mm, weight with a full tank * 230 kg, payload * 210 kg, tank capacity / reserve 20 / 4.5 liters. Two-year guarantee with unlimited mileage.Performance variant 25 kW (34 PS) Colors black, blue, silver Price 6140 euros Additional costs 115 euros

Technical data: Suzuki SV 650 S

Water-cooled two-cylinder four-stroke 90 degree V engine, transverse crankshaft, two overhead, chain-driven camshafts each, four valves per cylinder, bucket tappets, wet sump lubrication, electronic intake manifold injection, Ø 39 mm, engine management, uncontrolled catalytic converter with secondary air system, Electric starter.Bore x stroke 81 x 62.6 mm, displacement 645 cm3, rated output 53 kW (72 hp) at 9000 rpm, max. Torque 64 Nm (6.5 kpm) at 7200 rpm Pollutant values ​​(homologation) CO 2.01 g / km, HC 0.44 g / km, NOx 0.11 g / km Power transmission Mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, O-ring Cast aluminum bridge frame, bolted rear frame, load-bearing motor, telescopic fork, standpipe diameter 41 mm, adjustable spring base, two-arm swing arm made of aluminum profiles, central spring strut with lever system, adjustable spring base, double disc brake at the front, floating brake discs, Ø 290 mm at the rear, double piston calipers, disc brake Ø 240 mm, two-piston caliper, tires 120/60 ZR 17; 160/60 ZR 17 tires tested Dunlop D 220 L Chassis data Wheelbase 1430 mm, steering head angle 65 degrees, caster 100 mm, spring travel f / r 130/137 mm. Dimensions and weights Seat height * 820 mm, weight with a full tank * 196 kg, payload * 204 kg, tank capacity 17 liters. Two-year guarantee with unlimited mileageColors blue, silverPower variant 25 kW (34 PS) Price 6640 euros Additional costs 130 euros

Technical data: Yamaha FZ6 Fazer

Water-cooled four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine, two overhead, chain-driven camshafts, four valves per cylinder, bucket tappets, wet sump lubrication, electronic intake manifold injection, Ø 38 mm, engine management, uncontrolled catalytic converter with secondary air system, electric starter. Bore x stroke 65.5 x 44.5 mm, displacement 600 cm3, rated output 72 kW (98 PS) at 12,000 rpm, max. Torque 63 Nm (6.4 kpm) at 10,000 rpm Pollutant values ​​(homologation) CO 1.3 g / km, HC 0.65 g / km, NOx 0.11 g / km Power transmission Mechanically operated multi-disc oil bath clutch, six-speed gearbox, O-ring -Chain, chassis, bridge frame made of cast aluminum, telescopic fork, stanchion diameter 43 mm, two-arm swing arm made of aluminum profiles, central spring strut, directly hinged, adjustable spring base, double disc brake at the front, floating brake discs, Ø 298 mm, double-piston calipers, rear disc brake, Ø 245 mm, single-piston caliper. Tires 120/70 ZR 17; 180/55 ZR 17 tires tested Dunlop D 252 Sportmax Chassis data Wheelbase 1440 mm, steering head angle 65 degrees, caster 98 mm, spring travel f / h 130/130 mm. Dimensions and weights Seat height * 795 mm, weight with a full tank * 209 kg, payload * 188 kg, tank capacity / Reserve 19.4 / 3.4 liters.Warranty for two years with unlimited mileage.Colors: blue, silver, yellow.Price: 7350 euros; ancillary costs: 145 euros

1st place – Yamaha FZ6 Fazer

The new Fazer is a really good bike. Tiles extremely stable over the autobahn at 220 km / h, is unshakable in fast corners and, when things get tighter, offers decent comfort even for hours thanks to its finely appealing spring elements and the relaxed seating position. But where there is a lot of light, there is also shadow. The Yamaha is not super handy. And those who drive them have to like high speeds. Because the ideal country road engine looks different (see SV 650 S).

2nd place – Suzuki SV 650 S

Right at the front in the engine ranking, with the chassis with the music, in the safety chapter well in the race: Even if the SV loses a few points here and there, it is an all-round successful motorcycle. Except for the issue of comfort. The sporty seating position is not for everyone. If you like the humility attitude, you should grab it without hesitation. But even those who prefer to sit upright don’t have to do without the SV feeling. There is still the civil version without the S suffix.

3rd place – Kawasaki ZR-7S

The ZR-7S is getting on in years, no question about it. But the Kawasaki still has its qualities. Not nearly as agile as an SV 650, not nearly as direct and greedy as a Fazer. But blessed with a calming serenity. Comfortable, easy to drive and seldom thrown out of step even in difficult situations. Nevertheless, it is no longer enough to reach the top in the points evaluation. To turn blue spontaneously, on the other hand, always.

4th place – Suzuki GSF 600 S Bandit

Is it because of their reputation, their charm? Or does it offer its buyers exactly what they expect? The fact is: The Bandit is an old motorcycle, and you can see that especially when you compare it to the fresher competition. Not blessed with the increased displacement of the ZR-7S and not with the advantages of modern motorcycle construction, it cannot compete in almost any discipline against its sister SV 650 S and the new Fazer. Except in everyday suitability. But maybe that’s why it’s so popular.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.