Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test

20th photos

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Super athletes with less than 1000cm³ in the comparison test. Suzuki GSX-R 750, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Triumph Daytona 675.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Kawasaki ZX-6R 636.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Suzuki GSX-R 750.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Triumph Daytona 675
, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Kawasaki ZX-6R 636: Showa Big Piston fork with damping and preload adjustment separated by spars, decent response.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Suzuki GSX-R 750: Showa Big Piston fork with adjustable rebound and compression damping on both bars, moderate response.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Triumph Daytona 675: Kayaba cartridge fork with conventional adjustment options and extremely fine response.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Type customer: crouched and aggressive the Kawasaki, slim and lanky the Triumph, a little cozy the Suzuki.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Kawasaki ZX-6R 636: Fine: one-piece four-piston radial pliers from Nissin, very good effect, ABS as standard.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Triumph Daytona 675: Despite the old name, Triumph tries a practically new motorcycle. The question is: is it worth it?

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Suzuki GSX-R 750: Suzuki has been trying since 2011 without any technical changes. The question is: can this work out?

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Triumph Daytona 675.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Kawasaki ZX-6R 636: Red area only at 16,000 rpm, mapping and traction control display, but no fuel gauge.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Suzuki GSX-R 750: red area just over 14,000 rpm, two different engine mappings, also no fuel gauge.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Triumph Daytona 675: Red area at 14,600 rpm, no mapping variants, but a variety of information including fuel gauge.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Pure enjoyment: with the three displacement eccentrics on the coast of Provence – no one needs more.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Kawasaki ZX-6R 636: Kawasaki tries again with a little more displacement. The question is: is that enough?

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Suzuki GSX-R 750: Not quite so fine: one-piece four-piston radial calipers from Brembo, moderate effect, no ABS.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Triumph Daytona 675: Even finer: one-piece four-piston radial pliers from Nissin, great effect, steel-coated brake hoses, adjustable ABS.

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
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Triumph Daytona 675: Voilà, that fits! With a lot of fine-tuning and a lot of effort, the British have revised their three-cylinder athlete and created one of the best female athletes that can be bought. hats off!

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test

The exotic displacement among the super athletes

Let us pause for a moment in the pursuit of ever more engine power. Instead, we want to look for the athlete in ourselves, feel the speed and speed again and feel the road surfaces and tire grip limits. How it works? Wonderful with these three displacement eccentrics.

Not a second! Even if nobody wants to believe us, it’s true. We did not think for a single second of the topic of top performance on those fabulous sunny days on the country road in the cornering paradise of southern France. And that where everything else revolves around that. You almost feel guilty about that. After all, the Triumph engineers didn’t leave a nut on the thread of the new Daytona engine just to find three extra horsepower. Kawasaki has once again found what it is looking for when it comes to “more power and torque” with the ZX-6R 636, and Suzuki is doing what it has been doing for years if it is not doing anything else. One lies with the official performance rating that the bars bend, promises for them GSX-R 750 a whopping 150 hp instead of the actual 139. And why? Because somehow everyone always wants more performance. But I promise: we won’t this time, we’ll ignore the topic.

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Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test

Triumph Daytona 675, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Suzuki GSX-R 750 in the test
The exotic displacement among the super athletes


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Typology: crouched and aggressive the Kawasaki, slim and lanky the Triumph, a little more comfortable the Suzuki.

That is – admittedly – a harsh judgment that would probably have been a bit more gracious in another test field. Here, however, the GSX-R 750 has to compete with two competitors who are among the top performers in the scene, and not only in their displacement class. The new Kawasaki ZX-6R with the unusual displacement of 636 cubic centimeters has already proven its qualities in a single test (MOTORRAD 26/2012), and the new Triumph Daytona 675 is the worthy successor to an already strong predecessor.

This is of course and above all due to the engine. Anyone who was worried that the British would rob their triple of its splendid start in the speed cellar in the pursuit of more top performance (sic!) And more revving power will be disappointed in the most pleasant way. The opposite is the case. The new drive with a larger bore (plus two millimeters) and a smaller stroke (minus 2.7 millimeters), which has been changed in almost every detail and is in fact a new engine, shows, in contrast to the Suzuki development apathy, a great willingness to optimize. Triumph emphatically proves that even good things can be improved with the right effort. And we are now expressly not talking about the small increase in performance (on the MOTORRAD test bench 127 instead of the previous 125 hp), but about the exemplary linear power output and the inspiring start even very deeply from the lower speed range. Both have become even better in the course of the revision, because Triumph was able to shorten the gear ratio due to the 400 rpm higher maximum speed (16-tooth instead of 15-tooth sprocket at the front), which, by the way, gave the Daytona throughputs that would be worthy of a 1000-cc super athlete. If you then add the noticeably improved shiftability of the transmission (automatic gearshift available for an extra 345 euros) and the new, smoother anti-hopping clutch, the Daytona engine, which is still typical for triumph, whistles and growls with three cylinders, raises the bar so high that it does cannot be skipped by the others. At least not on the country road, where it practically doesn’t matter which gear you are currently in. The Daytona is always ahead.

Despite all the enthusiasm for the new engine, this is not only due to the three-cylinder, but at least equally because the new chassis worked just as well. A shorter swing arm, the resulting 20 millimeters shorter wheelbase, a 0.9 degree steeper steering head angle, but above all a significantly more front-heavy weight distribution due to the new exhaust (52.9 instead of 51.8 percent on the front wheel) and the associated new The coordination of the Kayaba spring elements is effective. In short: The Triumph delivers everything at the highest level that you miss on the Suzuki. It can be thrown playfully from one lean angle to the other (also thanks to the excellent Pirelli Supercorsa SP tires), steers extremely precisely, holds even the tightest curves and delivers such crystal-clear feedback that it is a pleasure.

No question about it, with this combination of powerful engine and agile, fine feedback suspension, it is very, very close to the perfect country road athlete. This is all the more true as Triumph did not completely defuse a central point of criticism from the past, but it did noticeably improve it. We are talking about the previously decidedly super sporty seating position, determined by the very high seat height and the handlebar stubs that are clamped down deeply. Minus ten millimeters (for the seat height), plus five millimeters (for the handlebar height) – this is the new Daytona formula, which is noticeably easier to digest in everyday life, without diluting the super sport feeling.


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Pure enjoyment: with the three displacement eccentrics on the coast of Provence – no one needs more.

Fortunately, the same applies to the new Nissin ABS, which weighs only 1.5 kilograms and can be set in two modes (road and racetrack) and also switched off if necessary. In road mode, it controls sensitively and safely and prevents stoppies right from the start, while race mode even allows courageous drifts with the rear wheel. The bottom line is that ABS means a real gain in safety without compromising – no matter where you are.

The same applies to the ABS of the third party in the group of alternative athletes ZX-6R 636. It does not regulate as finely as that of the Daytona, there are no modes to be selected and it cannot be switched off. Nevertheless, it is of course a gain, especially in dubious road conditions or emergency braking, just like the standard traction control of the Kawasaki. It drives better if you don’t need it – but it is there in the worst-case scenario.

As is the case with the whole 636. Anyone who understands this little cubic icing on the cake as a marketing gag is completely wrong. Need proof? Note the pulling power, which is clearly behind those of the Daytona, but noticeably ahead of those of the GSX-R 750. However, the short secondary translation naturally plays a role in this regard.

Anyway, the ZX-6R not only shines with convincing performance, but also with fine running culture and a balance that is rarely found in the Japanese class environment. With a single, but annoying blemish, namely the delayed throttle response when the engine speeds have plummeted in overrun mode. It feels like the throttle bodies are being drawn in by a vacuum, and of course it is especially noticeable when switching from the spontaneously responsive Triumph or the even very tough Suzuki. Incidentally, the optionally selectable mapping settings do not help with both Japanese women in this regard. Apart from that, however, the 636 engine hardly ever gives rise to the desire for more power, while the joy of this successful supersport package is firmly established in the consciousness. Above all, it is the chassis quality that is convincing.

On the very good, but also abrasion-friendly Bridgestone S-20 tires, the ZX-6R rolls wonderfully neutrally into the corners and almost as precisely as the Daytona, although it does not offer razor-sharp handling, but shines with more comfort (especially regarding the suspension strut adjustment). The same applies to the seating position: gathered, but comfortably, only the wide tank disturbs the well-being, while the four-in-line purrs comfortably to itself and its performance is unspectacular but so emphatically on the asphalt that the desire for more really only arises in the lowest speed regions . In addition, in the best Kawa tradition, there is a vehemently gripping braking system and a complete set of equipment that also makes the green athlete a serious 1000 alternative. Unfortunately – this also applies to the Suzuki by the way – this cannot necessarily be determined by the pricing. With over 13,000 euros, both Nippon bikes are very close to the Superbike clique, while the Daytona at least keeps a respectable distance with around 1,000 euros less. Because in this respect, too, it has long been true: enough is enough.

MOTORCYCLE scoring / test results


fact

Triumph Daytona 675: Voilà, that fits! With a lot of fine-tuning and a lot of effort, the British have revised their three-cylinder athlete and created one of the best female athletes that can be bought. hats off!

engine
Triple beats inline four. This is the motto of the engine chapter, because the triplet scores in almost all areas. Great pulling power, very good acceleration and (almost) impeccable manners. That results in victory in this chapter, even if the gearbox is still stubborn at high speeds. The Kawa messes up especially with the responsiveness, the Suzi with the smoothness.
Winner engine: triumph

landing gear
And the Daytona shines again. And especially with the driving dynamics criteria. In this respect in particular, the GSX-R 750 leaves a lot to be desired, while the 636 Kawasaki is not quite as well-trained, but comes across as balanced. This also includes the best suspension comfort, while the Triumph and even more so the Suzuki give a blow in the back.
Chassis winner: triumph

everyday life
Still a Japanese domain: everyday interaction. Regardless of whether ergonomics, wind protection or visibility in the rearview mirror – the Daytona scores points here. The ZX-6R also shines with traction control, the GSX-R with adjustable footrests and a multifunctional cockpit display that can be operated from the handlebars. And with the greatest range, because consumption is minimal.
Winner everyday: Kawasaki / Suzuki

security
Without ABS, nothing can be inherited in this chapter, not even with a bad brake. The Suzuki falls far behind, the Triumph shines like the Kawa with great stoppers and a well-functioning anti-lock device.
Winner safety: triumph

costs
The Suzuki eats the least, the bottom line is the Triumph. Because of the lowest inspection costs.
Winner Cost: Triumph

Price-performance
When the motorcycle with the most points costs the least, things are more than clear.
Price-performance winner: Triumph

max score Kawasaki Suzuki triumph
Overall rating 1000 684 662 691
placement 2. 3. 1. Price-performance note 1.0 2.0 2.3 1.6

Test results

1st Triumph Daytona 675
Voilà, that fits! With a lot of fine-tuning and a lot of effort, the British have revised their three-cylinder athlete and created one of the best female athletes that can be bought. hats off!

2. Kawasaki ZX-6R 636
And hats off again, even if it is not enough for the overwhelming triumph. The new 636 is a harmonious sports motorcycle and proves that even small displacements can be great fun.

3. Suzuki GSX-R 750
What a shame – especially for fans of the displacement class. But the GSX-R 750 shows what happens when you rest on your laurels. Model updates are urgently needed here, not only for ABS and Co.

Technical specifications


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Super athletes with less than 1000cm³ in the comparison test. Suzuki GSX-R 750, Kawasaki ZX-6R 636 and Triumph Daytona 675.

Kawasaki Suzuki triumph engine 
design type Four-cylinder four-stroke-
In-line engine
Four-cylinder four-stroke-
In-line engine
Three-cylinder four-stroke-
In-line engine
injection Ø 38 mm Ø 42 mm Ø 44 mm
coupling Multi-panes-
Oil bath clutch
(Anti-hopping)
Multi-panes-
Oil bath clutch
(Anti-hopping)
Multi-panes-
Oil bath clutch
(Anti-hopping)
Bore x stroke 67.0 x 45.1 mm 70.0 x 48.7 mm 76.0 x 49.6 mm
Displacement 636 cm3 750 cm3 675 cm3
compression 12.9: 1 12.5: 1 13.1: 1
power 96.4 kW (131 PS)
at 13500 rpm
110.3 kW (150 PS)
at 13200 rpm
94.0 kW (128 PS)
at 12500 rpm
Torque 71 Nm at 11500 rpm 86 Nm at 11200 rpm 74 Nm at 11900 rpm
landing gear
frame Bridge frame
made of aluminium
Bridge frame
made of aluminium
Bridge frame
made of aluminium
fork Upside-down fork,
Ø 41 mm
Upside-down fork,
Ø 41 mm
Upside-down fork,
Ø 41 mm
Steering damper electric / hydraulic hydraulically
Brakes front / rear Ø 310/220 mm Ø 310/220 mm Ø 310/220 mm
Assistance systems SECTION ABS (400 euros)
bikes 3.50 x 17; 5.50 x 17 3.50 x 17; 5.50 x 17 3.50 x 17; 5.50 x 17
tires 120/70 ZR 17;
180/55 ZR 17
120/70 ZR 17;
180/55 ZR 17
120/70 ZR 17;
180/55 ZR 17
Tires Bridgestone S 20 “J” Bridgestone BT 016 “G” Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP
Dimensions + weights
wheelbase 1395 mm  1390 mm  1375 mm 
Steering head angle 66.5 degrees 66.4 degrees 67.0 degrees
trailing 101 mm 97 mm 87 mm
Front / rear suspension travel 120/134 mm 120/130 mm 110/129 mm
Seat height ** 820 mm 805 mm 820 mm
Weight with full tank ** 196 kg 195 kg 191 kg
Payload ** 178 kg 185 kg 190 kg
Tank capacity / reserve 17.0 liters 17.0 liters 17.4 liters
Service intervals 6000 km 6000 km 10000 km
price 13,195 euros 13140 euros 11890 euros
Price test motorcycle 13,195 euros 13140 euros 12290 euros ***
Additional costs 180 euros 190 euros 395 euros
MOTORCYCLE readings
Top speed * 260 km / h 280 km / h 258 km / h
acceleration
0-100 km / h 3.4 sec 3.2 sec 3.4 sec
0-140 km / h 5.1 sec 4.7 sec 4.9 sec
0-200 km / h 9.8 sec 8.6 sec 9.4 sec
Draft
60-100 km / h 3.8 sec 4.2 sec 3.5 sec
100-140 km / h 3.9 sec 3.9 sec 3.5 sec
140-180 km / h 4.0 sec 4.3 sec 3.7 sec
Consumption highway 4.9 liters / super 4.4 liters / super 5.0 liters / super
Reach country road 347 km 386 km 348 km
* Manufacturer information; ** MOTORCYCLE measurements; *** including ABS (400 euros)

Performance measurement


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Here performance is an issue: performance graph.

Here, performance is finally an issue, but not the only one. Because in view of the measured performance (see table on the right), it is also worth taking a look at what arrives at the rear wheel. Explanation: In the left diagram, as usual, the power at the crankshaft is shown over the speed. There, the Suzuki is well above the two smaller-displacement rivals except for the range below 4500 rpm and also achieves the highest peak performance with 139 hp, while the three-cylinder Triumph does well and the four-cylinder Kawa is always under control. However, if the translation comes into play, things are different.


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The rear wheel power in sixth gear over the speed.

The diagram shows the rear wheel power in sixth gear versus speed. And lo and behold: The Suzuki, with a long gear ratio in favor of a high top speed, is suddenly on top of or even below the other two, which is documented in the pull-through ratings and can thus be largely transferred to the smaller gears. The bottom line is that Triumph does the best.

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