Yamaha patent application – two-cylinder with turbocharging

Yamaha Turbo Patent Office Drawings
Yamaha

Yamaha Turbo Patent Office Drawings

Yamaha Turbo Patent Office Drawings

Yamaha Turbo Patent Office Drawings

4th photos

Yamaha Turbo Patent Office Drawings
Yamaha

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Yamaha has patented a two-cylinder with turbocharging.

Yamaha Turbo Patent Office Drawings
Yamaha

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The two-cylinder appears to be an MT-09 engine capped by a cylinder.

Yamaha Turbo Patent Office Drawings
Yamaha

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The loader sits in front of the engine block.

Yamaha Turbo Patent Office Drawings
Yamaha

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The patent provides for the loader to be installed in two different heights.

Yamaha patent application

Two-cylinder with turbocharging

The Japanese motorcycle manufacturer Yamaha has patented a two-cylinder engine with turbocharging. The patent does not necessarily mean that the supercharged twin will also come.

D.The patent that emerged was filed in Japan in 2016 and in Europe in 2017. Now the patent seems to have gone through all instances.

The supercharged two-cylinder is shown in the patent specification in the chassis of the Yamaha MT-09. In the case of the two-cylinder seems to be used by a motor. The originally 847 cm³ three-cylinder was capped by a cylinder. This then results in a two-cylinder with around 565 cm³ displacement. The exhaust gas turbocharger is located in front of the cylinder block, the compressed intake air is routed around the cylinder on the left side through a water-cooled charge air cooler to the intake area. The patent shows two possible positions for the charger: Version 1 places the turbine at the bottom in front of the crankcase; Variant 2 provides for the loader high in front of the cylinder head. The space available for the catalytic converter changes accordingly.

Turbo for the Euro 5

Why a turbo at all? With the upcoming Euro 5 standard, the emission requirements and probably also the noise limits will be tightened. The turbo engine has a lower consumption compared to an equally powerful naturally aspirated engine, because an otherwise unused part of the exhaust gas energy contributes to the engine’s performance. The friction and heat losses of the smaller turbo engine are lower. The torque curve of a turbo engine can be designed more favorably. The turbo engine is quieter than an equally powerful naturally aspirated engine because, among other things, it is smaller and therefore the engine’s sound-radiating surface is smaller. The turbocharger itself acts as an additional silencer.

The bottom line is that the turbo helps to meet the upcoming requirements without losing performance.

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