Honda CB 350 Four

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

Honda CB 350 Four

Honda CB 350 Four

Honda CB 350 Four

Honda CB 350 Four

19th photos

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

1/19

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

2/19
The Honda advertising was right: Since the CB 350 F, one had to see the four-cylinder world with different eyes.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

3/19

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

4/19
No zero number: The original odometer reading was not reset, even if the condition of the 350 is more in line with the trip odometer reading.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

5/19
The CB 350 F cuts a particularly sporty figure in the color “Flake Matador Red” (only built in 1972 and 1973).

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

6/19
Well-rounded: the taillights and indicators were not square and square meters in 1972, but the indicator lenses were very deep.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

7/19
Banished from the cockpit, the ignition lock ekes out its existence on the left under the tank, mounted on its own small boom.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

8/19
A four-cylinder straight out of a designer’s picture book – with clever solutions, as evidenced by the oil filter housing that is neatly fitted into the fork of the frame support.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

9/19
Everything original and in top condition, as the stamped part number in the beautiful four-in-four exhaust system proves.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

10/19
Completely wrong: the tank lock treats itself to its own spot next to the tank lid instead of being integrated into it.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

11/19
The cover of the brake disc does not protect against moisture, but the effect of the brake is convincing.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

12/19
Honda CB 350 Four; Price 1972: 4,298 marks.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

13/19
In 1972 the petite CB 350 F was called “four-cylinder for 100-pound girls”.

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

14/19

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

15/19

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

16/19

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

17/19

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

18/19

Honda CB 350 Four
Bilski

19/19

Honda CB 350 Four in the studio

Classy, ​​petite, handy

Content of

With the Honda CB 350 Four, Honda rounded off its four-cylinder range at the beginning of the 1970s. The smooth-running barrel organ pleased with its charm and handling and has achieved cult status to this day.

Anticipation is the greatest joy, and sometimes the best comes at the end. It remains to be seen whether it is the best among the first Honda four-cylinder engines. But one had to wait the longest for them. After the 750 and 500 cc saw the Honda C.B 350 Four finally came into the world of two-wheelers in 1972 as the last of the trio.

Buy complete article

Honda CB 350 Four

Honda CB 350 Four in the studio
Classy, ​​petite, handy

Playful handling bewitched every driver

But the Honda CB 350 Four also has a lot to offer. As stated in the first test back then: Honda had “built a motorcycle that some drivers dream of: technically playful, classy, ​​petite, with sporty performance and manageable”. Everything applies. With the dry 170, ready-to-ride 190 kilogram bike, even less powerful pilots got along, the playful handling beguiled practically every rider from the first meter. The always praised stability of the chassis ennobles the design of the frame – a combination of pressed sheet steel parts, connected to the front main tube, which divides into two beams. The too hard rear struts and their poor damping were criticized.

The heart of the Honda CB 350 Four, the four-cylinder, is not simply, as one might assume, a scaled-down version of the well-known 750 or 500 series, but a new design. Only designed with a slightly long stroke, the small four-cylinder may need high speeds to develop power, but it can also cope with it without complaint. Even at speeds in the red range from 10,000 rpm, the piston speed is in the uncritical range. Little goes below 6000 rpm, between 7000 and 9500 tours, if necessary the music also plays in the five-digit range.

Rearview mirror PDF: Test Honda CB 350 four-cylinder

PDF: Driving report: Honda CB 350-4 (MOTORRAD 24/1972)

Honda CB 350 Four for sale

Honda CB 350 Four with technically complex solutions

The crankshaft has five slide bearings, and the connecting rods also run on slide bearings – the best prerequisites for low-vibration, smooth running. The Honda CB 350 F has a number of technically complex solutions to offer, such as the four 20 mm Keihin carburettors with the same slide control system as the 500. The throttle slide is evenly controlled via a linkage, which is operated desmodromically by two cables. To work on the carburettors or to adjust the valve clearance, you only need to remove the (too small) 12 liter tank above the main frame pipe. This is easier with the 350 because, unlike the 500/750, there is only one fuel line from the fuel tap to a distributor between the central carburetors, with the float chambers all connected to one another.


Bilski, Jacek

No zero number: the original odometer reading was not reset.

Helmut Schindler, the owner of the picobello photo bike, will certainly not have to screw or adjust a lot in the near future. The Honda CB 350 Four has undergone many years of extensive restoration by professionals and has only run a good 500 kilometers since it was completed in 2003. You don’t see the total mileage of almost 52,000 kilometers on the Honda – all parts have been revised or renewed.

The overhaul of the four-cylinder was carried out by specialist Roland Eckert, the engine could hardly have come into better hands. In 1979 Schindler acquired the machine (built in 1973) for an affordable 1700 marks, with just over 20,000 kilometers. In the years that followed, the Kelkheim-based driver added around 30,000 more kilometers before he decided in 1994 to have the CB 350 Four completely restored.

The goal was clearly defined: the 350 should be 100 percent as good as new. The costs initially calculated for this were already in the five-digit D-Mark range. At first no one could have guessed that it would last until August 2003, but neither does the 70-year-old bother. There were always enough other motorcycles ready to drive. Helmut Schindler also does not contest the fact that the total costs ultimately accumulated represent the value of a suitably equipped new small car. He wanted his Honda CB 350 F to be perfect – and that’s exactly what it became.

Technical data Honda CB 350 Four

Engine: Four-cylinder four-stroke in-line engine, two valves per cylinder, bore 47 mm, stroke 50 mm, 347 cm³, compression 9.3: 1, 34 hp at 9500 rpm, four 20 mm Keihin carburettors, multi-disc oil bath clutch, five-speed gearbox, chain drive.

Landing gear: Single-loop tubular frame, telescopic fork at the front, Ø 33 mm, two-arm swing arm with two spring struts at the rear, disc brake at the front, Ø 260 mm, drum brake at the rear, Ø 160 mm, dry weight 170 kg, tank capacity 12 l.

Prize 1972: 4,298 marks

Related articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *