Noise driving ban in Austria: Legal series motorcycles also affected

Table of contents

Motorcycle noise

Debate about the volume of motorcycles

Noise driving ban in Austria: Legal series motorcycles also affected
Manufacturer, Markus Jahn, Arturo Rivas, moonrun (fotolia)

counselor

traffic & business

Noise driving ban in Austria: Legal series motorcycles also affected

Since June 10th, a driving ban for motorcycles with a stationary noise above 95 dB (A) has been in effect on some routes in Tyrol. MOTORRAD asked the manufacturers which current models are affected.


Eva Breutel,


Michael Schumann

07/21/2020

Namlospass, Hahtennjoch, Tannheimer Tal, Lechtal – all popular excursion routes for motorcyclists in Tyrol. But some of them have to stay out there now, because the Tyrolean state government has issued a regulation that locks out motorcycles with a stationary noise of over 95 dB (A). Anyone who ignores the ban must expect a fine of 220 euros and will also be sent back.

An extremely questionable regulation, because there are no limit values ​​for stationary noise in the homologation regulations of the European Union. The stationary noise for motorcycles is usually measured at half the nominal speed; for machines with a nominal speed of less than 5,000 rpm, it is measured at three quarters of the nominal speed. However, the standing noise does not play a role for the homologation. It is written in the vehicle registration document so that the police can carry out a simple follow-up measurement on site during an inspection and thus determine whether the exhaust is standard.


#image.jpg


BMI / Gerd Pachauer.

Breakdown: The Tyrolean police have also been on the road on Ducati Multistrada 1260 so far – standing noise 102 dB (A). The models have now been withdrawn from Tyrol.

The Tyrolean ban, which applies to tourists and locals alike, means that completely legal motorcycles, for which tax and insurance are paid, are declared illegal vehicles on certain routes. The consequence could be a severe loss of value, quite apart from the fact that motorcyclists with corresponding machines who live on the routes are, so to speak, coldly expropriated. Absurdly, they can still drive along the routes in the towns, because no prohibition signs have been set up there, but not on the federal and state roads concerned.

Stand noise is in the vehicle documents

So skepticism is appropriate, especially since the regulation was implemented practically in a flash: it was only announced at the end of May and came into force on June 10th. The Tyrolean state government countered protests about this ad-hoc implementation with the argument that it was only a pilot project and not a measure planned for a long time. However, the regulation applies until October 31st – and then the motorcycle season is practically over. Another point of criticism: The stationary noise says little about the actual noise development of a passing motorcycle. This can already be seen from the fact that some of the machines that MOTORRAD testers perceived as very loud do not even come under the 95 dB (A) regulation.

opinion poll

Voted 25920 times

Noise driving bans in Austria: Is your bike affected by the driving ban??

Fortunately not!

Unfortunately yes …

read more

Find out standing noise or have it checked

Anyone can find out whether their own machine is affected by the driving ban in Tyrol in the vehicle documents or on the type sticker: The stationary noise is specified under item U.1 of the registration certificate.
We are currently only aware of possible technical solutions from accessory providers such as the exhaust expert Hattech near Ulm: The company, including boss Hubert Sommer, has only six employees and makes motorcycles quieter. It offers, for example, the ability to reduce the standing noise of a Euro 3 homologated BMW R nineT from 98 to 94 dB (A), including TuV approval. This requires two dB killer inserts, which Hattech welds point-wise in the original silencer – price 560 euros. This includes the costs of an individual acceptance that the owner must have carried out by the TuV. This confirms the reduction of the standing noise to 94 dB (A), which is finally entered in the papers at the registration office (cost: approx. 15 euros). In addition, Hattech offers silencers for all R1200 / 1250 GS models, which lead to a significant volume reduction. The current noise discussion and the Tyrolean closings have unexpectedly helped the company to increase the order situation.”We have received up to 200 inquiries every day since then. People want to know how to make their machines quieter”, says the graduate engineer. In principle, solutions for numerous motorcycles are conceivable, said Sommer. Since Hattech has so far mainly specialized in retrofitting BMWs, the company has the largest offer for bikes from Bavaria in order to comply with the new Tyrolean noise limit.

In response to a request from MOTORRAD, the most important motorcycle manufacturers explained what the current range looks like. The information is therefore the information from the manufacturer.

Aprilia

With the Italians, all large four-cylinder engines are banned from driving, the rest of the range is still allowed to jet through Tyrol.

Noise driving bans in Austria – Aprilia models affected

model Registered stationary noise
Aprilia RSV4 1100 Factory 105 dB (A) at 6,500 rpm
Aprilia RSV 1000 RR 96 dB (A) at 6,500 rpm
Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 Factory 96 dB (A) at 5,500 rpm
Aprilia Tuono V4 1100 RR 96 dB (A) at 5,500 rpm

BMW

The people of Munich are lucky: Despite the flap exhaust, the bestseller R 12500 GS does not come under the Tyrolean regulation. According to BMW are too “older GS models are not affected by the current status.” It only affects the super sports car S 1000 RR (Euro 4 with 98 db (a)), even the XR, already homologated according to Euro 5, is just below the limit with 94 dB (A). The latest R 1250 GS (Euro 5) brings it to 88 dB (A) standing noise, the R 1250 GS Adventure (also Euro 5) to 90 dB (A) – for both free travel in Tyrol.

Ducati

The Bolognese are currently giving up in Tyrol: A large part of the model range develops more than 95 dB (A) stationary noise.

Noise driving bans in Austria – affected Ducati models

model Registered stationary noise
Ducati Diavel 1260 102 dB (A) at 4,750 rpm
Ducati Hypermotard 950 97 dB (A) at 4,500 rpm
Ducati Monster 1200 97 dB (A) at 4,625 rpm
Ducati SuperSport 98 dB (A) at 4,500 rpm
Ducati Multistrada 1260 102 dB (A) at 4,750 rpm
Ducati Multistrada 1260 Enduro 98 dB (A) at 4,750 rpm
Ducati Panigale V2 102 dB (A) at 5,375 rpm
Ducati Panigale V4 107 dB (A) at 6,500 rpm
Ducati Panigale V4 R 107 dB (A) at 7,625 rpm
Ducati Streetfighter V4 106 dB (A) at 6,375 rpm

Harley-Davidson

For the Americans with their huge range of models, the proportion of motorcycles with over 95 db (A) stationary noise is not that great: only seven motorcycles fall under the new Tyrolean ban.

Noise driving bans in Austria – Affected Harley-Davidson models

model Registered stationary noise
Harley-Davidson XL1200NS Iron 1200 98 dB (A) at 3,000 rpm
Harley-Davidson XL1200C Sportster 1200 Custom 98 dB (A) at 3,000 rpm
Harley-Davidson XL1200X Forty-Eight 98 dB (A) at 3,000 rpm
Harley-Davidson XL1200XS Forty-Eight Special 98 dB (A) at 3,000 rpm
Harley-Davidson XL1200T SuperLow 1200T 98 dB (A) at 3,000 rpm
Harley-Davidson XL1200CX Roadster 97 dB (A) at 3,000 rpm
Harley-Davidson FXDRS FXDR 114 99 dB (A) at 3,375 rpm

Honda

Even the model boys from Japan caught the driving ban in Austria. Whereby a high level of standing noise was to be expected with the super sporty flagship Fireblade, but it comes as a surprise with the CB 650 R. The CB 1000 R is also affected.

Noise driving bans in Austria – affected Honda models

model Registered stationary noise
Honda CBR 650 R ABS (RH01 / RH07) 97 dB (A) / 96 dB (A)
Honda CB 650 R ABS (RH02 / RH08) 97 dB (A) / 96 dB (A)
Honda CB 1000 R ABS (SC80) 97 dB (A)
Honda CBR 1000 RR ABS (SC77) 99 dB (A)
Honda CBR 1000 RR SP1 99 dB (A)
Honda CBR 1000 RR SP2 99 dB (A)
Honda CBR 1000 RR (SC82) 99 dB (A)
Honda CBR 1000 RR SP 99 dB (A)

Husqvarna

According to the Husqvarna headquarters in Austria, none of the current models is affected by the ban in Tyrol.

Indian

The US manufacturer claims that it does not use any exhaust flaps. Due to the concept, according to Indian, the air-cooled 111 and 116 engines that are installed in the Chief, Chieftain, Springfield and Roadmaster series are above the newly set limit value of 95dB (A) stationary noise and are therefore affected by the driving ban. All water-cooled engines of the series FTR, Scout, Scout Bobber and Challenger are well below 95 dB (A).

Kawasaki

According to Kawasaki Germany, the following models from the Japanese manufacturer fall under the driving ban in Tyrol:

Noise driving bans in Austria – affected Kawasaki models

model Registered stationary noise
Kawasaki ZR 900 F. 97 dB (A)
Kawasaki Ninja ZX-10R / RR / SE 97 dB (A)
Kawasaki Ninja H2 97 dB (A)
Kawasaki Z 900 No information (only open variant affected)

KTM

At the Austrian manufacturer, according to the headquarters in Mattighofen, only one model is too loud for the Tyrolean routes, namely the 890 Duke R..

Moto Guzzi

The factory from Lake Como gets away with it unscathed: The entire current range of models can continue to jet through Tyrol.

MV Agusta

The sports motorcycle manufacturer from Varese in northern Italy states that the following motorcycles will be affected on certain Tyrolean routes:

Noise driving bans in Austria – affected MV-Agusta models

model Registered stationary noise
MV Agusta Brutale 800 Rosso / America 96 dB (A)
MV Agusta Brutale 800 RC / RR 98 dB (A)
MV Agusta Brutale 800 Dragster Rosso 96 dB (A)
MV Agusta Brutale 800 Dragster RR / RC 98 dB (A)
MV Agusta F3 675 RC 101 dB (A)
MV Agusta F3 800 RC 98 dB (A)
MV Agusta Superveloce 800 100 dB (A)
MV Agusta Brutale 1000 RR / RC Series Oro 97 dB (A)
MV Agusta Rush 1000 97 dB (A)

Suzuki

According to the German subsidiary of the Japanese manufacturer, the following models are above 95 dB (A) standing noise:

Noise driving bans in Austria – affected Suzuki models

model Registered stationary noise
Suzuki GSX-R 1000 R / RZ 96 dB (A)
Suzuki GSX-R 1000 96 dB (A)
Suzuki Katana 1000 99 dB (A)
Suzuki GSX-S 1000 99 dB (A)
Suzuki GSX-S 1000 F. 99 dB (A)

triumph

The German branch of the British provides a list of all models affected by the Tyrolean driving ban from 2017 to 2020 inclusive and points out that the Tiger 1200 is also available with 92 dB (A) instead of 97 dB (A) stationary noise, namely when the Motorcycles are equipped ex works with the in-house Arrow accessory silencers. If you want to retrofit your Tiger 1200 with the Arrow, you can do that. Triumph Germany has even prepared a confirmation with which dealers / customers can then have the lower value entered in the papers by means of a change acceptance. The entry is unfortunately inevitable, as the Tyrolean police proceed strictly according to the value in the vehicle registration document, the certificate alone is not enough to avoid a penalty.

Noise driving bans in Austria – affected Triumph models

model Registered stationary noise
Triumph Bonneville Bobber (2017-2020) 97 dB (A)
Triumph Bonneville Bobber Black (2018-2020) 97 dB (A)
Triumph Bonneville Speedmaster (2018-2020) 97 dB (A)
Triumph Daytona Moto2 765 (2020) 97 dB (A)
Triumph Rocket 3 GT / R (2020) 99 dB (A)
Triumph Rocket 3 TFC (2020) 102 dB (A)
Triumph Speed ​​Triple R (2016-2018) 96 dB (A)
Triumph Speed ​​Triple S (2016-2018) 94 or 96 dB (A)
Triumph Street Triple R (2017-2019) 96 dB (A)
Triumph Street Triple R (2020) 98 dB (A)
Triumph Street Triple R-LRH (2017/2018) 96 dB (A)
Triumph Street Triple R LRH (2019) 96 dB (A)
Triumph Street Triple R LRH (2020) 98 dB (A)
Triumph Street Triple RS (2020) 97 dB (A)
Triumph Street Twin (2019) 96 dB (A)
Triumph Street Twin A2 (2019) 96 dB (A)
Triumph Thruxton 1200 R TFC (2019) 96 dB (A)
Triumph Tiger 1200 XCX (2018-2020) 97 dB (A)
Triumph Tiger 1200 XR (2018-2020) 97 dB (A)
Triumph Tiger 1200 XRT (2018) 97 dB (A)
Triumph Tiger 1200 XRX (2018-2020) 97 dB (A)
Triumph Tiger 1200 XRX Low (2018-2020) 97 dB (A)

Yamaha

According to information from Yamaha Germany, almost all current models are below the Tyrolean limit of 95 dB (A). According to Yamaha, only the R1 and R6 are above this and are affected by the Tyrol-Aus.

Conclusion

Almost every large manufacturer is affected by the noise driving bans. Should other regions and countries also follow Austria’s example, BMW, Honda, Ducati will join forces & Co. then have to come up with something at the latest.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.