Six super sports tires in a comparison test

Table of contents

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
markus-jahn.com

Six super sports tires in a comparison test

Six super sports tires in a comparison test

Six super sports tires in a comparison test

Six super sports tires in a comparison test

16 pictures

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
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When it is wet, there is only a fine line between grip and take-off. Good skins offer a wide range of limits and behave in the same good-natured manner.

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
mps photo studio

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Pirelli Diablo Rosso (2nd place).

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
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Michelin Power 3 (5th place).

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
mps photo studio

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Metzeler M7 RR (1st place).

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
mps photo studio

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Dunlop Sportsmart 2 (6th place).

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
mps photo studio

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Continental Sport Attack 3 (3rd place).

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
mps photo studio

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Bridgestone S 21 (3rd place).

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
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Incorruptible: Evaluation by data recording.

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
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Ideal for testing: the circuit has slow and fast, wide and narrow passages.

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
markus-jahn.com

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Tire change in chord. For the test in Mireval, Dunlop provided us with a fully equipped van including staff. Merci bien!

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
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We determined the tire temperatures after a dry and wet test.
Anomalies: none.

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
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In the assembled state, we checked the effective tire width.

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
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On the circuit we simulated sporty country road driving and also tested the limits of the tires on fast laps.

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
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You can’t do without it: first screw, then test. With six pairings, there are seven wheel changes. Reason: The first tire is checked again at the end.

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Clear announcement: The water features begin shortly after the sign.

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Image gallery: Comparison of super sport tires 2016.

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Six super sports tires in a comparison test

Six super sports tires in a comparison test
Fast hour

Content of

The big PS sports tire comparison test is the shootout for the best sports rubber of 2016.

Volkmar Jacob

10/12/2016

At the start of the 2016 sports tire test, the newly developed soles from Bridgestone (S 21), Continental (Sport Attack 3) and Pirelli (Diablo Rosso III). In addition, the established skins rise from Dunlop (Sportsmart 2), Metzeler (M7 RR) and Michelin (Power 3) in the ring. All tires (front 120/70, rear 190/55) go through the same procedure: check cold running properties, simulate sporty country road bolts on the racetrack-like circuit, explore the fine line between grip and take-off on the wet track, lap times glow on wet and dry tracks. The latter, however, is only used for orientation, because there are more suitable road-legal material for really fast laps, keyword hypersport tires. Still, it’s amazing what some of the soles can do on the slopes.

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Tire pressure in the test

Especially since these skins do not need tire warmers and provide good grip after a short time. That is why we indicate in the individual boxes the (reduced) racetrack air pressure recommended by the manufacturers for the cold state. Basically, a lower air pressure offers more contact area (“Latsch”) and thus more grip. In addition, the self-damping improves. And because the rubber flexes harder, it also warms up faster. Except when chasing the times, we feel the skin on the flanks with a uniformly prescribed 2.5 / 2.9 bar (front / rear).

To anticipate it: this year, too, there will not be the outstanding rubber that pulverizes the competition in all disciplines. Nevertheless, a real all-rounder has emerged – at least according to our proven points evaluation. Anyone who sets their preferences differently simply picks out the criteria that are relevant to them and chooses their own favorite tire. On page 56 [booklet] we describe the individual test criteria and what we pay attention to when driving. In the following sections we report on positive and negative abnormalities of the rubbers.

Cold running behavior

Nobody is really naked here. Most of the test persons convey a very good feeling from the first meter and warm up in no time. At least at asphalt temperatures between 25 and 36 degrees, which prevail at the time of the test. Only the tires from Bridgestone and Dunlop need a few more curves and look a bit wooden at first.

Handling

Bridgestone and Conti are clear high-flyers in this chapter. It is simply wonderful how little effort the test Yamaha R1 uses to bend on these soles. A quick pull on the handlebars, light pressure on the thighs, the bike storms into the corners and the fun factor increases immeasurably. Traditionally, the Rosso series from Pirelli needs a bit more pressure for this, which is due to its high stability. Nevertheless, the R1 can also be directed through the round on the Italian rubber with manageable effort. On the Dunlops, the Yamaha bends somewhat unwillingly in the corners, despite the narrowest tire width on the front wheel, and tends to curve wide when exiting a curve. Not tragic, but noticeable in direct comparison. The pelts of Metzeler and Michelin prove the very good midfield.

Accuracy

The absolute top discipline of the Bridgestone S 21. Simply sensational, how razor-sharp the tire hits the line: aim at the curve, arrow through, done. Even on the brakes, the test Yamaha lasered through the corners with millimeter precision. The Metzeler follows closely behind, then the Conti. On the soles of Michelin and Pirelli, the R1 also shoots precisely through the ground, only the Dunlop seems slightly indifferent when turning.

stability

This is where the Pirelli Rosso III shines. Nothing disturbs this tire, it can even withstand hard braking or acceleration attacks unimpressed and keeps the bike firmly on course. This stability creates immense trust and optimizes braking and acceleration points. After a very good midfield, Dunlop and Michelin follow. The latter deforms strongly at the rear when fully attacked, causing the test machine to stir from the rear. Raising the air pressure from the recommended 1.9 bar to 2.5 bar brings a significant improvement. Nevertheless, there is still a lot of movement in the framework. The Michelin Power 3 does not tolerate racing pace, but sporty country road pace works without any problems.

Grip

Everyone can do this – almost. Because here, too, the Michelin leaves some springs under full load. Although it does not heat up more than the competition with a tire temperature of 48 degrees (rear wheel), the grip tears off comparatively early. The result: sometimes robust slides. The Sportsmart 2 from Dunlop does this a little better, but it also begins to slide earlier than the strong competitors. After all, the rubber conveys the bond line very clearly, and the slides are gentle and even. The other brands provide first-class grip for this type of tire and even survive racing pace without complaint – world class!

Behavior in the border area

With the exception of Michelin, whose liability is a tad more pithy than the competition, there’s not much to report in this chapter. For everyone else, loss of grip is usually associated with short, good-natured slides. At least when the pilot carefully pulls the throttle at the exit of the curve. We do not assume any liability for gross motor skills who fully cock the cock at the apex.

Righting moment when braking

Consistently problem-free with all brands. Easy to set up only at Dunlop and Michelin.

Feedback

Bridgestone, Metzeler and Pirelli provide the best feedback. With them, the pilot clearly feels what the asphalt has to offer. This transparency brings security and thus speed. Just behind it the Conti, which also provides very decent feedback. Slight cutbacks at Dunlop and Michelin.

Wet test

Here, grip, feedback and behavior in the limit area are particularly important. Clear winner in all three criteria: Michelin. It’s great how confidently the Power 3 glides over the water, indicating the limit of grip and gently starting to slide when the pilot crosses it. The Metzeler M7 RR, which also masters this exercise very well, follows a little behind. And, listen and be amazed: The Pirelli Diablo Rosso has recently performed very well in the wet. The Sport Attack 3 is also convincing. Conti has finally made its youngest skin waterproof. Bridgestone and Dunlop bring up the rear.

final

The fast hour is coming to an end and shows once again how much progress and dynamism there is in the tire market. But although the manufacturers do their best, the purchase is always a compromise. But that’s less than ever. Glorious times!

Bridgestone S21


Six super sports tires in a comparison test


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Bridgestone S 21.

Front dimension: 120/70-ZR 17
rear: 190/55-ZR 17

Weight v./h .: 4.24 / 6.95 kg

effective tire width v./h .: 118/192 mm

Country of Manufacture: Japan

max points Points
Dry test result 200 183
Result of the wetness test 100 75
Total 300

258

Conclusion: Bridgestone has uncompromisingly tuned the successor to the S 20 Evo for dry performance. Logically, he secured the top podium there together with the Metzeler M7 RR. The strengths of the S 21 lie in its nimble handling, razor-sharp accuracy – even on the brakes – and high stability. Because it puts you in a good mood, it is our first choice for sporty gaits. In contrast, the Bridgestone looks a bit bulky in the cold state, and in the wet it is clearly behind the best: comparatively little grip, poor feedback, narrow limit area. Ultimately, the S 21 lands in third place.

Continental Sport Attack 3


Six super sports tires in a comparison test


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Continental Sport Attack 3

Front dimension: 120/70-ZR 17
rear: 190/55-ZR 17 

Weight v./h .: 4.32 / 6.52 kg

effective tire width v./h .: 119/188 mm

Country of Manufacture: Germany

max points Points
Dry test result 200 179
Result of the wetness test 100 79
Total 300

258

Conclusion: With the Sport Attack 3, Conti is aiming more at better wet driving behavior. The difference is remarkable, the distance to the tip is smaller. Nevertheless, he still lacks a good bit there, keywords grip, feedback and behavior at the limit. In addition, in dry conditions it does not angle as jaggedly and precisely as its predecessors, who excelled in these disciplines. With the completely newly developed “Dreier”, the Hanoverians created a good all-rounder, which, however, no longer has a unique selling point in any category. The bottom line is that it shares third place with the Bridgestone.

Dunlop Sportsmart 2


Six super sports tires in a comparison test


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Dunlop Sportsmart 2.

Front dimension: 120/70-ZR 17
rear: 190/55-ZR 17 

Weight v./h .: 4.36 / 7.19 kg

effective tire width v./h .: 111/195 mm

Country of Manufacture: France

max points Points
Dry test result 200 157
Result of the wetness test 100 72
Total 300

229

Conclusion: Penultimate rank in the dry, in wet the Dunlop even carries the red lantern. Sportsmart 2 is entering its third year in 2016 and is struggling against the sometimes brand new competition. The differences come into play especially when driving in a sporty manner: a little more sluggish turning, not as precise as the tip, noticeable righting moment when braking, a little less grip. After all, slides announce themselves in good time and the pilot can feel when he has to take off the gas. In contrast, the Sportsmart 2 provides slightly diffuse feedback when it is wet. After all, it is one of the best when it comes to braking in the wet.

Metzeler M7 RR, (front “M.”)


Six super sports tires in a comparison test


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Metzeler M7 RR.

Front dimension: 120/70-ZR 17
rear: 190/55-ZR 17

Weight v./h .: 4.15 / 6.99 kg 

effective tire width v./h .: 117/189 mm 

Country of Manufacture: Germany

max points Points
Dry test result 200 183
Result of the wetness test 100 84
Total 300 267

Conclusion: A first place in the dry (together with the Bridgestone) and a second in the wet results in a clear test victory. The M7 RR shows no weaknesses in dry or wet conditions and can even do the racetrack really well. He proves the latter impressively with the fastest time. In terms of the individual criteria, he is hot on the heels of the respective specialist, and is often even on the same level. This is also noteworthy because, like the Dunlop, it is already in its third year of raiding the area. The Metzeler is a hot tip for sporty drivers and our favorite all-rounder of 2016!

Michelin Power 3


Six super sports tires in a comparison test


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Michelin Power 3.

Front dimension: 120/70-ZR 17
rear: 190/55-ZR 17 

Weight v./h .: 4.22 / 6.61 kg

effective tire width v./h .: 118/189 mm

Country of Manufacture: Spain

max points Points
Dry test result 200 156
Result of the wetness test 100 89
Total 300 245

Conclusion: A tire with a big difference between dry and wet performance. He can handle sporty road milling very well. On the slopes, however, it brushes the sails: comparatively manageable liability reserves, poor stability. An air pressure (rear wheel) raised from 1.9 bar (manufacturer’s recommendation) to 2.5 bar does bring an improvement, but the difference to the top is still large. But the Power 3 shines in the wet. The best grip, great feedback and good-natured behavior at the limit range make him the god of rain. A good skin for a more moderate sporty appearance.

Pirelli Diablo Rosso 3


Six super sports tires in a comparison test


mps photo studio

Pirelli Diablo Rosso 3.

Front dimension: 120/70-ZR 17
rear: 190/55-ZR 17 

Weight v./h .: 4.24 / 6.58 kg

effective tire width v./h .: 118/189 mm

Country of Manufacture: Germany

max points Points
Dry test result 200 181
Result of the wetness test 100 82
Total 300 263

Conclusion: When developing the Rosso III, the Italians ensured good cold and wet adhesion. They did both extremely well, which means that the Pirelli has a wider range of uses than its predecessors. Fortunately, he has retained his very sporty character. The captivating stability is outstanding, the skin can handle even the toughest attacks with ease. In the dry test, he only misses two points on the two leaders, which is due to the still somewhat sluggish handling. In the wet, the Rosso III also took a good third place, which put it in second place overall.

Review at a glance

max points

Bridgestone

S 21

Continental

Sport Attack 3

Dunlop

Sportsmart 2

Metzeler

M7 RR

Michelin

Power 3

Pirelli

Diablo Rosso 3

Dry test result 200 183 179 157 183 156 181 Result of the wetness test 100 75 79 72 84 89 82 Total 300 258 258 229 267 245 263 placement   3. 3. 6th. 1. 5. 2.

Water worlds

On the evenly irrigated wet handling course in Mireval, the rubber chaff separates from the wheat and clarifies the question of whether a water rocket or a water pipe. Although the route is only 1.6 kilometers long, there is a whopping 3.5 seconds between the fastest tire (Michelin Power 3) and the slowest (Bridgestone S 21). The diagram below illustrates the differences.

The blue line stands for the Michelin, the red one for the Bridgestone. The Power 3 is clearly ahead at almost every point on the course. The reference area (see right and below) forms an even, eternally long right-hand curve, where the testers can feel their way perfectly to the adhesion limit. With an average speed of 76.2 km / h and an incline of 30.6 degrees, the Michelin pours the Japanese rubber properly, which wanders through the curve in search of grip at 73.2 km / h and an incline of 28.8 degrees. Clearly Michelin delivers the best hydrogen, Bridgestone prefers dry courses to water features.

Everything fresh?

Sooner or later the old slippers will be worn out and new ones will have to be found. Once you have decided on the brand and type, it should be rubbers with the most recent production date possible. But is the quality of older skins really worse? Manufacturers and dealers agree: no! That is not surprising, after all, they also want to sell old goods. If stored correctly (dark, cool, no direct sunlight, no UV and infrared light), tires should easily survive for several years without any loss of quality.

We put it to the test and chased the Metzeler Racetec Interact in a K3 mixture around the slopes on behalf of sporty tires. One pairing comes from our warehouse, the other was contributed by Metzeler. “Our” front tire was produced in the fourth week of 2012, so it is over four years old. The younger specimen from the manufacturer comes from the 36th week of 2015. The rear rubbers, however, hardly differ in the production date (46th and 47th week 2013). Metzeler was unable to deliver a younger skin, and production was discontinued some time ago. But now to the all-important question: Were there differences between the tires??

We put it to the test and chased the Metzeler Racetec Interact in a K3 mixture around the slopes on behalf of sporty tires. One pairing comes from our warehouse, the other was contributed by Metzeler. “Our” front tire was produced in the fourth week of 2012, so it is over four years old. The younger specimen from the manufacturer comes from the 36th week of 2015. The rear rubbers, on the other hand, hardly differ in the production date (46th and 47th week 2013). Metzeler was unable to deliver a younger skin, and production was discontinued some time ago. But now to the all-important question: Were there differences between the tires??

This is how PS tests

A Yamaha YZF-R1 served as the test bike. We completed the functional test in the dry on the three-kilometer-long, racetrack-like circuit on the Dunlop site in Mireval in the south of France. We also carried out the wet test on this site. We evaluated the following criteria:

Cold running behavior How long does a tire take to reach operating temperature, how does it feel when it warms up??

Handling What steering force is required to tilt the bike or to keep it in line in slow / fast alternating curves?

Accuracy* It is determined in passages at different speeds with different curve radii and provides information on how the motorcycle is following the desired course, which is specified by the steering forces. Are clear line corrections necessary? Stability How stable is the motorcycle when accelerating and braking? Does the tire lead to unrest in the chassis? The stability is also tested in different speed ranges in an inclined position, in which the tires can rock up when being out of power.

Grip* This is the sum of the total liability of a tire. It consists of lateral guidance in maximum inclination on wet and dry asphalt as well as grip when accelerating on the straights and out of corners. A tightrope walk that only a closed route allows.

Behavior in the border area* How well can a tire be controlled at the limit of its grip??

Aufstellmoment When braking in an inclined position, the motorcycle straightens up differently depending on the deceleration and tire contour. The driver has to compensate for this reaction with a counterforce (push) on the inside of the handlebar.

Feedback What feedback does a tire provide to the pilot? The clearer the feedback, the easier it is to drive in the limit area.

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