Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX

Table of contents

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX

19th pictures

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

1/19
Honda CBX 1000 with single-sided swing arm, Girder fork, parts of a Golf 7 and can be driven on the road. Wimoto from the Netherlands plays the big motorcycle puzzle.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

2/19
Requirement of the customer: “Front and rear by single arm, still mobile, please spoke rims and all that on the six-end Honda. Just surprise me!”

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

3/19
First simulation using 3D software: Original geometry with the new components, unfortunately not mobile. So all over again.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

4/19
The original CBX frame had to be reinforced, especially in the area of ​​the steering head. The torsional forces acting on the one-sided wheel suspensions on the frame would be too great.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

5/19
Wimoto uses wheel hubs from the BMW R 1200 GS, on the rear of the drive of a VFR 750, and in front of the Golf 7.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

6/19
The swing arm and fork are made from chromoly steel by Wimoto. A light and at the same time high-strength steel alloy.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

7/19
Wimoto doesn’t do anything on the powerful row six of the CBX with its 100 hp …

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

8/19
… on the frame and chassis all the more. The CBX gets a completely new geometry for stability and drivability

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

9/19
At the front, a hub of the R 1200 GS rotates on the bearing of a Golf 7, the 18th are spoked”- Stainless steel rims from JSR.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

10/19
The hub of the GS is also used at the rear, but on the drive of a Honda VFR 750, which also takes over the braking system and the eccentric tensioning device for the chain.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

11/19
YSS supplies the adjustable rear shock, which is attached eccentrically to the frame.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

12/19
Six cylinders, six carburetors with open filters. Generations of mechanics have already failed here when synchronizing.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

13/19
The 6-in-1 system from Kerker was already installed. Wido simply puts the muffler up on the rim for free security.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

14/19
The principle of the Girder fork is over 100 years old, but it is still justified today when it is made as blatant as it is here.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

15/19
Wimoto builds the one-armed guide itself from chromoly tubes, the black fork bridge with aluminum struts are milled from one piece.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

16/19
Similar filigree tubular work on a swing arm is probably only found on Ducati’s MH900 stainless steel.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

17/19
The exhaust pipe winds arm thick through the artful swing arm.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

18/19
Adapted hump of a CB 900 Bol d’Or.

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX
Floris Velthuis

19/19
Wido places the dungeon silencer high at the rear.

motorcycles

Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX

Honda CBX 1000 from Wimoto
Six cylinders with two single-sided swing arms

If a Honda CBX 1000 with a single-sided swing arm appears, that is: interesting. If she also wears a single-sided swing arm as a fork, that’s: crazy. Wimoto Engineering did just that with the six-cylinder queen.


Jens Kratschmar

December 21, 2020

Correction: Of course, it is technically wrong to call the front suspension shown here a single-sided swing arm. A trapezoidal or girder fork is not a rocker in terms of its operation, even if it may work that way with such a construction. Now we can all calm down again.

And finally the story of the Honda CBX begins with the two single-sided swing arms. Wido from Wimoto Engineering got the idea for this from his customer Reinoud, who actually only says: “Front and rear by single arm, still mobile, please spoke rims and all that on the six-end Honda. Just surprise me!” Sounds almost like the Saturday shopping list. Everything is possible, thinks Wido and begins to design.


Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX


Floris Velthuis

First simulation using 3D software: original geometry with the new components, unfortunately not mobile. So everything is new for once.

Design and construction

The conversion begins with the measurement of the original bike and subsequent 3D simulation of the new components with the original geometry. Result: unfortunately does not work at all. So a new geometry has to be calculated. Steering angle, caster, wheelbase, length of the swing arm and pivot point, position of the shock absorber. Once everything is new that can be achieved using 3D modeling in the CAD software Solidworks after a few hours of construction.


Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX


Floris Velthuis

Honda CBX 1000 with single-sided swing arm, Girder fork, parts of a Golf 7 and can be driven on the road. Wimoto from the Netherlands plays the big motorcycle puzzle.

Reinforced CBX frame

The original frame of the Honda CBX is not exactly known for its rigidity, the term folding hinge frame is coined here. In particular, the thin front fork in combination with the high engine weight is only something for Lowenherz drivers. Wido needs enormous stability for the attachment of two wheels mounted on one side with their correspondingly high torsional forces on the swing arm bearing and steering head, and for this the Honda frame has to be reinforced. The challenge is to keep these reinforcements invisible. Several chromoly pipes are welded in, creating a few extra triangles under the tank.


Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX


Floris Velthuis

The hub of the GS is also used at the rear, but on the drive of a Honda VFR 750, which also takes over the braking system and the eccentric tensioning device for the chain.

Swing arm with Honda graft

The final drive of a Honda VFR 750 serves as the basis for the one-sided rear wheel suspension. The wheel hub of a BMW R 1200 GS with an 18 inch rim was adapted and spoked. Wimoto manufactures the swing arm itself on chromoly tubes. The YSS shock absorber is placed eccentrically, also to make room for the exhaust system. An exquisite powder coating provides the finish.


Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX


Floris Velthuis

Wimoto builds the one-armed guide itself from chromoly tubes, the black fork bridge with aluminum struts are milled from one piece.

Trapeze fork based on the old model

The fork construction is based on the model of old trapezoidal or parallelogram forks that were installed on motorcycles between the 1920s and the beginning of the 1950s. Each manufacturer had a different name for the same, sometimes slightly different principle. The names therefore became known: Girder fork, Brampton fork, Druid fork, Girdraulic, Tiger fork and Webb fork. The construction in pressed steel on the many DKW models is likely to have been most widespread in Germany.

Too much for history, back to the future: The front fork of the CBX is designed according to the principle of the old trapezoidal fork, but as a single-arm version. Was it already on the Imme R100 in 1949, just not for very long. It is also made at Wimoto from chromoly tubes, and it also has a YSS shock absorber and an 18-inch rim with a GS hub. The extraordinary construction is almost crowned by the wheel hub of a VW Golf 7. The two triple trees and the trapezoidal struts are milled from high-strength aluminum. We know the perimeter brake, i.e. the giant disc with an internal caliper, from the Buell XB models.


Conversion: single-sided swing arm for the Honda CBX


Floris Velthuis

Wido places the dungeon silencer high up on the stern.

Honda story beyond the frame

Since Wido leaves nothing unchanged in the chassis and frame, the great Honda history of the 1970s and 1980s should be clearly visible in terms of bodywork. He leaves the tank of the CBX untouched and adapts an old Bol d’Or rear to the shortened rear frame. Wido up-dates the iconic rump with LED technology for lighting. Wido swings neatly next to the rear of the authentic dungeon muffler, which is already installed on the dispenser CBX.

Conclusion

“Madness skilfully made mobile” or “News from Krassistan”: Even under these headings, our story would be an excellent introduction. It is not the first such extreme new chassis from Wimoto, hopefully not the last and a six-cylinder is always allowed anyway.

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