Cornering ABS stability control for everyone

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Cornering ABS stability control for everyone
KTM

Cornering ABS stability control for everyone

Cornering ABS stability control for everyone

Cornering ABS stability control for everyone

Cornering ABS stability control for everyone

20th pictures

Cornering ABS stability control for everyone
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KTM 1190 Adventure with cornering ABS MSC from Bosch.

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Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch.

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Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch.

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Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch.

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Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch.

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Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch.

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Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch.

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Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch.

counselor

technology & future

Cornering ABS stability control for everyone

Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch
Stability control for everyone

A motorcycle without ABS? Hard to imagine today. A car without ESP? Not for sale. The situation is similar with the stability control for motorcycles. Guaranteed.

Stefan Kaschel

04/24/2014

For the Bosch developers, the matter is clear. Curves are the icing on the cake for motorcyclists. But this soup is often too salty. Crash, bum, bang – and man and machine are no longer in the corner, but in the corner. “46 percent of all motorcycle accidents happen in bends,” the Swabian supplier giant knows. And in the autumn of last year, in cooperation with KTM, they surprised everyone with the first stability control for motorcycles, or MSC for short. With this, according to Bosch, 67 percent of these cornering accidents could be prevented.

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That’s an announcement, and anyone who – like MOTORRAD in issue 4/2014 – checks, comes to the conclusion that it could be correct. And especially when the nightmare of all bikers occurs: quickly into a corner, perhaps suddenly wetness or an obstacle – and then really hacked on the brakes in shock in a neatly sloping position. Then that was it – in most cases.

Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch without special hardware

But not with the MSC, which adapts the braking force to the speed, the inclined position and the current slip of the wheels and, thanks to the partially integral brake of the KTM 1190 Adventure, even cleverly distributes it between the front and rear wheels. The highlight of the matter is: All of this is possible without special hardware if wheel and lean angle sensors are on board. As in the case of the 1190 Adventure, where 2013 models can also be retrofitted with MSC by simply installing the software.

It’s that simple. In principle, also for other manufacturers, because KTM has by no means secured the exclusive rights to Bosch technology. On the contrary: Bosch is in talks with many manufacturers (see interview), the development team in Yokohama is practically stationed on the doorstep of the major Japanese manufacturers. Not least, in order to make appropriate contacts on site and to guarantee another condition for the widespread use of MSC, namely large numbers. It is only through this that new technologies, which are initially offered in high-priced vehicles, become attractive for the mass market. That was the case with ABS, and it won’t be any different with the MSC, even if one has to assume a slimmed-down system because of the missing composite brake.

At Bosch, of course, we know that other suppliers such as Nissin are also working with other motorcycle manufacturers on such or similar systems, and that they are working flat out. It is not yet known when they will be so far. Just as little as the time when BMW – usually a pioneer in matters of safety technology and an old Bosch customer – will be on the market with a corresponding offer. But it will come. Certainly.

Cornering ABS stability control for everyone

motorcycles


KTM 1190 Adventure with MSC from Bosch


Tried new lean ABS


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Cornering ABS stability control for everyone

technology & future


Cornering ABS MSC from Bosch in the test


Braking in an inclined position without falling?


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MOTORRAD action team curve school 2014

The others do that

Nissin developed

“The stability control developed by Bosch has certainly brought movement to the market,” writes the English MOTORRAD employee Ben Purvis – and provides the proof at the same time. These are photos of two Triumph Tiger 800s with powerful crash bollards or elaborately wired braking systems.

For some – namely traditional Bosch customers such as BMW, Ducati or Kawasaki – things are actually simple. Call Bosch, make an appointment, get started. “If we are talking about a complex system, that is, a system with traction control, then you should estimate a good year for the application,” explains Bosch man Yildirim. With less complex systems, it could also be faster. For the others, the matter is a little more difficult.

Triumph, for example, is traditionally associated with the Japanese manufacturer Nissin, which in turn is firmly in Honda hands. It is clear that there must be a reaction to the Bosch offensive. Therefore, the Erlkonig photos are hardly surprising, and officially the British make no secret of the fact that both the stability control and the active chassis are at the top of the priority list. “Anyone who doesn’t have the topic on the agenda has not understood something,” admits Triumph Germany press spokesman Uli Bonsels openly.

Interview with Dr. Fevzi Yildirim


Cornering ABS stability control for everyone


KTM

Dr. Fevzi Yildirim (47) heads the two-wheel safety department at Bosch.

Dr. Fevzi Yildirim (47) heads the two-wheel safety department at Bosch. He has been working and developing with his team in Yokohama, Japan for years.

Mr. Yildirim, as the person responsible for Bosch two-wheeler safety, you don’t work in Germany, but in Yokohama. why?

Because the Japanese manufacturers offer motorcycles in all relevant markets around the world, and in large numbers. Second, the Japanese are not technology trendsetters in all but in many areas. And third, people in Japan have always been good at making things as compact as possible – a core competence for successful motorcycle products. This is what prompted us to set up the Center of Competence for motorcycle safety in Japan. But of course, colleagues around the world also help develop. The MSC is not a Japanese product, but primarily a Bosch product.

But the MSC – or Cornering ABS, as we call it internally – you’d like to see in many Japanese motorcycles, right??

Let me briefly mention a technical aspect: In our understanding, MSC is a systemic approach that intelligently connects existing systems in the motorcycle. It is a milestone similar to ABS in the motorcycle world a good 20 years ago. Today it is comparable to the ESP in the automotive sector. MSC makes motorcycling safer and more dynamic in all driving situations. When accelerating and braking, when driving straight ahead and now for the first time also in bends, i.e. in an inclined position.

So it is your hope that this complex system will not only be used in expensive upper-class models, but that it will become widespread in the car, similar to ABS or ESP?

Yes, and hopefully quickly and in all motorcycle segments.

The first motorcycle with MSC is the KTM 1190 Adventure. What does another manufacturer have to do if they want to offer the MSC in their motorcycles?

Contact us. But we are already in discussions with almost all manufacturers. We didn’t promise our pilot customer KTM any exclusivity because that is not possible with such a small market. We are always ready to apply MSC for a wide variety of motorcycles.

Who are you talking to now?

You will understand that we are not allowed to give our customer names. We talk to European as well as Japanese and American customers about MSC systems or MSC partial functions.

The keyword partial functions leads to the next question. What hardware does a motorcycle need to be able to apply MSC??

There has to be a Bosch ABS system on board, along with the wheel sensors, and we need the sensor box to measure the condition of the vehicle. That’s it. It is not possible to deliver a software module to a motorcycle manufacturer who has an ABS hydraulic unit from one of our competitors.

A compound brake is required?

We applied a partially integral brake system to the pilot customer, but we can also equip fully integral systems. Further considerations are under development.

Is that more specific? We’re talking about Japan and the number of units, and thus about motorcycles with conventional braking systems?

We are of course working on implementing MSC sub-functions with a standard ABS. However, a dynamic, curve-dependent braking force distribution still requires a composite braking system. Other sub-functions, with which we simply control the braking force or the traction control in the curve, can, however, already be implemented with normal two-channel systems.

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